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THE

Defender Picks

 

MERCREDI

May 24th

Jazz Pilates

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 12PM

Led by renowned jazz vocalist Stephanie Jordan

 

Happy Hour Sessions

The Foundation Room, 5PM

Featuring the raw blues and smokey femininity of Hedijo

 

Shake It Break It Band

21st Amendment, 5PM

Step back in time and enjoy some tunes

 

Lighting from a Theatrical Perspective

NOLA Community Printshop, 6PM

Hosted by veteran Lighting Designer, Andrew J. Merkel

 

Free Spirited Yoga

The Tchoup Yard, 6:30PM

Free yoga, optional beer and food

 

Big Easy Playboys

Bank Street Bar, 7PM

Mixing roots, rock, and blues

 

Think Less, Hear More

Hi-Ho Lounge, 9PM

Spontaneous compositions to projected movies

 

 

JEUDI

May 25th

Soft Opening

Royal Brewery, 11AM

Come celebrate the opening of NOLA’s newest brewery

 

Doreen’s Jazz New Orleans

Royal Street, FQ, 11AM

Doreen Ketchens and her band

 

Jazz in the Park

New Orleans Armstrong Park, 4PM

Music by Honey Island Swamp Band + Hot 8 Brass Band

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 6PM

Featuring the funky sounds of Margie Perez

 

Conversation: On Cecilia Vicuña

Contemporary Arts Center, 7PM

Discussion on the “About to Happen” exhibition

 

JD Hill & The Jammers

Bar Redux, 8PM

R&B, rock blues, and everything in between

 

Luke Winslow King

Tipitina’s, 9PM

Support by The Washboard Rodeo

 

Dave Easley

Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 10PM

Witness one of the city’s best guitarists

 

VENDREDI

May 26th

Bayou Country Superfest

Mercedes Benz Superdome, 11AM

Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton, Rascal Flatts and many more

 

Magazine St. Art Market

Dat Dog, 4PM

Happy hour + local art

 

Royal Street Stroll

200-900 Blocks of Royal St, 530PM

Led by the Krewe of Cork

 

YP Family Game Night

Urban League of Greater New Orleans, 6PM

Game night for young professionals and their families

 

Toonces and Friends

Marigny Opera House, 7PM

An orchestral journey through time

 

Spektrum Fridays

Techno Club, 10PM

Featuring J.DUB’L and residents Erica and Rye

 

New Thousand + Adrian

Balcony Music Club, 11PM

Violin centered hip hop

 

Free Music Series

Fulton Ally, 10PM

Featuring Bubl Trubl


World Trade Center, Ferry on 'New Orleans Nine' Most Endangered Places List


New Orleans' iconic landmarks take many forms, with live oak trees, tombstones, blighted houses and, of course, really tall buildings, all part of what makes the Crescent City landscape identifiable. But the changing New Orleans landscape leaves many of these spots open to the possibility of going from the list of landmarks to "Ain't Dere No More." Each year, the Louisiana Landmarks Society complies the New Orleans Nine list of most endangered landmarks, and this year's compilation isn't leaving current events out of the mix.

 

The list, which is compiled through a nomination process, seeks to get the word out about threatened sites. The LLS will hold a reception to recognize the nine on Sunday, June 30, from 4-6 p.m. The free reception is at the LLS headquarters in the Pitot House, located at 1440 Moss St. on Bayou St. John.

 

“This year’s list focuses on some timely preservation issues we will be grappling with—from the fate of the World Trade Center building and St. Louis Cemeteries No. 1 and 2, to the future of ferry service, and the problem of occupied blighted residences,” said Walter Gallas, LLS executive director.

 

Two of the selections look to turn the public's attention to the battles brewing at the foot of Canal Street.

 

Tourism officials want to knock down the long vacant World Trade Center at the foot of the downtown drag to make way for a public sculpture or other type of tourist draw, akin to the gateway arch in St. Louis. The tourism officials argue that option will give New Orleans a site that will be a centerpiece attraction for the city's many visitors.

 

But that's not the only proposal in the running as part of a plan to revamp the entire downtown. Two other developers want to keep the building in place and renovate. One of the bidders, Gatehouse Capitol, has started planting signs with the tagline "Save the WTC." Leading historic preservation advocates including the Preservation Resource Center have come down on the side of renovating the 1960s-era building. The first meeting about the redevelopment will be held at City Hall on Monday at 10 a.m. The hearing will include a public comment period, and supporters of keeping the building in place plan to rally in front of City Hall at 9 a.m.

 

"A distinctive structure in the city skyline, the city-owned WTC building is in danger of being demolished even though it is perfectly serviceable and capable of being redeveloped," the LLS writes.

 

Even closer to the Big Muddy, the Algiers Ferry is staring down a foggy future. In the wake of budget cuts that seemed to doom the commuter boat between the Banks, the state floated the ferry service an extension with reduced hours. That allowed time for a local entity to step in and assume management from the state now that the Crescent City Connection Bridge is no longer in charge of the boat. The ferry dates back to 1827, according to the LLS.

 

In Treme and the Seventh Ward, the list also includes the area included in the Choice Neighborhood Housing Initiative, which is redeveloping homes to be put back into commerce as part of the federally-backed, mixed-income program. The redevelopment of the Iberville projects is also included in this initiative.

 

"The City and Housing Authority must take care to ensure that the development of the housing units, along with subsequent commercial endeavors, are sensitive to the historic community and living culture of this area," the LLS writes.

 

St. Louis Cemeteries No. 1 and 2 are also threatened by the Iberville Redevelopment, according to the Society, earning the Treme burial grounds a place on the list. More than just a backdrop for an Easy Rider acid trip, the LLS holds the cemeteries up as the final resting place of some of New Orleans' most prominent icons and families. Both cemeteries are located adjacent to the Iberville, and could face damage if not properly protected, the LLS writes.

 

"Extraordinary precautions must be taken to protect and preserve these extremely historic and highly visited sites before any work begins," the LLS writes.

 

The list isn't only focused on bricks and stones. According to the LLS, the live oak canopy around New Orleans remains under threat of being "butchered for public works projects," LLS writes. Most recently, 100-year-old trees on Napoleon Avenue suffered root damage and branch mutilation. LLS also criticized the Army Corps of Engineers for cutting the trees to move large cranes and other equipment for the river.

 

"It will be decades before the trees recover, and we will lose much of the scenic character of the city in the process," the LLS writes.

 

The scene of a large fire in Treme also made this year's list. The house at 1347 Esplanade Ave. burned in a four-alarm fire on Easter Sunday as owner Joan Brooks looked on. The LLS is looking to ensure that the Italianate Greek Revival-style cottage at 1347 Esplanade Ave. - which was already dilapidated before the fire - is repaired.

 

"Rain now freely pours into this irreplaceable building, causing further damage," the LLS writes. "Anchoring a prominent corner of Esplanade, this building cannot afford to be lost."

 

The list also spotlights blighted, historic buildings that the Society feels could be threatened with demolition by neglect if they are not protected and renovated.

 

An Italianate double gallery duplex in Central City at 1828-30 Baronne Street has been given designation as landmarks by the city's Historic District Landmarks Commission (HDLC), but the building's owner has left the house in "serious decline," the LLS writes. A former school at 1831 Polymnia St. was given the same designation, but the three story building is currently uninhabitable and has no plans for redevelopment anytime soon.

 

The ninth entry on the list is reserved for Blighted Occupied Residences, which have gained attention as part of Mayor Mitch's Fight the Blight initiative and other programs in the wake of the Federal Flood.

 

"An occupied home should not be lost to a city authority because the owner does not maintain it to government standards," the LLS writes. "Only proactive solutions that first stabilize a blighted residence can address the most complex cases while still respecting constitutional property rights. The city must strive to support homeowners while preserving the historic built environment of our neighborhoods."

 

Stephen Babcock contributed reporting.




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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily