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THE

Defender Picks

 

SAMEDI

July 22nd

Ice Cream Social

Longue Vue, 10AM

Plus adoptable pets from the SPCA

 

Veggie Growing Basics

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Grow your own food

 

National Hot Dog Day

Dat Dog, 3PM

Raffles, ice cream and more

 

Cocktails and Queens

Piscobar, 6PM

A queer industry dance party

 

Immersive Sound Bath

Nola Yoga Loft, 7PM

Soothing 3D Soundscapes

 

Paul Mooney

Jazz Market, 8PM

Also ft. music by Caren Green

 

New Orleans Beatles Festival

House of Blues, 8PM

Come together, right now

 

Christmas in July

The Willow, 8PM

Ugly sweaters and peppermint shots

 

HOUxNOLA

Three Keys, 9PM

With Coolasty ft. Jack Freeman and more

 

Particle Devotion

Banks St Bar, 9PM

Ft. Paper Bison +  Tranche

 

Cesar Comanche

Art Klub, 9:30PM

Ft. Ghost Dog, Knox Ketchum and more

 

Gimme A Reason

Poor Boy’s Bar, 10PM

Ft. Savile and local support

 

Techno Club

Techno Club, 10PM

Ft. Javier Drada, Eria Lauren, Otto

 

DIMANCHE

July 23rd

From Here to Eternity

Prytania Theatre, 10AM

The 1953 classic

 

Eight Flavors

Longue Vue, 12PM

Sarah Lohman will discuss her new book

 

Book Swap

Church Alley Coffee Bar, 12PM

Bring books, get books

 

Urban Composting

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Learn about easy composting

 

Brave New World Book Club

Tubby & Coo’s, 2PM

Open to all

 

Gentleman Loser

The Drifter Hotel, 3PM

A classic poolside rager

 

Mixology 101

Carrolton Market

With Dusty Mars

 

Freret Street Block Party

Freret St, 5PM

A celebratory bar crawl

 

Mushroom Head

Southport Music Hall, 6PM

+ Hail Sagan and American Grim

 

Glen David Andrews

Little Gem Saloon, 8PM

Get trombone’d by the greatest

 

Hot 8 Brass Band

The Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Brass music for a new era

 

Church*

The Dragon’s Den, 10PM

Ft. KTRL, Unicorn Fukr, RMonic


Toilet Tussle

Louisiana Sues Feds Over Bathroom Directive, JBE and Landry Feud



The state of Louisiana is part of a lawsuit filed against the Obama administration, positing that a directive allowing transgender students in public schools to use the bathrooms and locker rooms that match their gender identity lacks any authority. However, the state government, itself, is embroiled in an internal war over LGBT rights.

 

The filing accuses the federal government of “running roughshod over commonsense policies.” Louisiana is joined in the suit by eight other states – Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia and Wisconsin – as well as the governor of Maine, Paul R. LePage; the Arizona Department of Education; and school districts in Arizona and Texas.

 

“For too long, the Federal government has directed education policy to the detriment of Louisiana’s students,” said Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry in a statement. “I will not allow Washington to wreak further havoc on our schools.”

 

It is unclear whether Governor John Bel Edwards also supports the suit. His office did not respond to a request for comment before press time. However, the pair are in the midst of a high profile feud centered around LGBT rights.

 

In April, Edwards issued an executive order (JBE 2016-011) aimed at protecting the rights of LGBT citizens. According to the governors office, employers can no longer discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, political affiliation, disability, or age. The order does include an exemption for churches and religious organizations.

 

However, Landry took exception to the act, issuing a delayed response on Tuesday (5.25). He clearly is opposed to the move due to end-effect, but chose a more historic attack on executive orders themselves. “JBE 2016-011 goes beyond merely filling in the enforcement gaps surrounded and defined by statutory legislation and exceed statutory authority by attempting to create new legislation in violation of the separation of powers,” stated Landry in a release. “The Governor's constitutionally valid function is to see that the laws are faithfully executed and enforced, not to make any of the laws, which, constitutionally is the legislative power and function.”

 

Edwards wasted no time in issuing a rebuttal. Hours later, he released his own statement. “The attorney general has overstepped the authority given to his office, and he is now, attempting to erode the constitutionally granted executive order power of the governor and is disrupting the work of state agencies,” da Gov’ wrote. “…More importantly, this executive order, for the first time, was written in a way that respects the religious beliefs of every single person in Louisiana. Discrimination, of any kind, is not a Louisiana value, and I will do everything in my power, including enforcing this order, to foster a productive and welcoming work environment in Louisiana’s state government.”

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily