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THE

Defender Picks

 

SAMEDI

July 22nd

Ice Cream Social

Longue Vue, 10AM

Plus adoptable pets from the SPCA

 

Veggie Growing Basics

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Grow your own food

 

National Hot Dog Day

Dat Dog, 3PM

Raffles, ice cream and more

 

Cocktails and Queens

Piscobar, 6PM

A queer industry dance party

 

Immersive Sound Bath

Nola Yoga Loft, 7PM

Soothing 3D Soundscapes

 

Paul Mooney

Jazz Market, 8PM

Also ft. music by Caren Green

 

New Orleans Beatles Festival

House of Blues, 8PM

Come together, right now

 

Christmas in July

The Willow, 8PM

Ugly sweaters and peppermint shots

 

HOUxNOLA

Three Keys, 9PM

With Coolasty ft. Jack Freeman and more

 

Particle Devotion

Banks St Bar, 9PM

Ft. Paper Bison +  Tranche

 

Cesar Comanche

Art Klub, 9:30PM

Ft. Ghost Dog, Knox Ketchum and more

 

Gimme A Reason

Poor Boy’s Bar, 10PM

Ft. Savile and local support

 

Techno Club

Techno Club, 10PM

Ft. Javier Drada, Eria Lauren, Otto

 

DIMANCHE

July 23rd

From Here to Eternity

Prytania Theatre, 10AM

The 1953 classic

 

Eight Flavors

Longue Vue, 12PM

Sarah Lohman will discuss her new book

 

Book Swap

Church Alley Coffee Bar, 12PM

Bring books, get books

 

Urban Composting

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Learn about easy composting

 

Brave New World Book Club

Tubby & Coo’s, 2PM

Open to all

 

Gentleman Loser

The Drifter Hotel, 3PM

A classic poolside rager

 

Mixology 101

Carrolton Market

With Dusty Mars

 

Freret Street Block Party

Freret St, 5PM

A celebratory bar crawl

 

Mushroom Head

Southport Music Hall, 6PM

+ Hail Sagan and American Grim

 

Glen David Andrews

Little Gem Saloon, 8PM

Get trombone’d by the greatest

 

Hot 8 Brass Band

The Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Brass music for a new era

 

Church*

The Dragon’s Den, 10PM

Ft. KTRL, Unicorn Fukr, RMonic


Taceaux Loceaux's BP-Sponsored Seafood Giveaway


by Brad Rhines

This free, curbside taco was brought to you by BP. As New Orleans rang in the New Year with packed hotel rooms and football fever, the excitement spread far beyond the Superdome. Blimps and billboards shined overhead, as corporate entities like Allstate, AT&T, and even the much-maligned British Petroleum were taking advantage of the crowds, and making their presence known around town. The oil company that was responsible for the Big Oozy sponsored the “Gulf Coast Seafood and Tourism 2012 Bash,” a two-week push to support local seafood and help clean up their own image.

 

 

 

The stunt struck many as doing the right thing, but for the wrong reasons. With last fall's white shrimp harvest down and lots of fomenting anxiety about next year's oyster crop, locals continue to feel a need to promote Louisiana's seafood industry as it tries to pull itself back up. But, like always, BP's promotions contain a sunny picture of a fully recovered Gulf Coast that seems to obscure the long-term impacts of the oil disaster.

 

 

Plaquemines Parish fisherman A.C. Cooper told the AP the overall campaign distorts the image of the Gulf Coast's recovery.

 

 

"The numbers on our shrimp are way down," he said. "They (BP) make it sound like they're doing a lot, but they're not doing much to help the fishermen out ... I got good fishermen struggling to pay their bills right now."

 

 

On the streets of New Orleans, Uptown food truck Taceaux Loceaux got in on the Bash, giving away free seafood taceaux during the promotion, much to the delight of tourists and locals alike. NoDef caught up with Taceaux Loceaux co-owner Maribeth Del Castillo to talk about the navigating the rough waters between big oil and local fish.

 

 

According to Del Castillo, Taceaux Loceaux was contacted just days before the event and asked if they were interested in participating in the Gulf seafood promotion.  “We agreed to that because the times that we have done seafood, we’ve always used Gulf Coast seafood,” Del Castillo told NoDef.  “It was a good way for us to help promote a product we already believe in.”

 

 

The truck set up around town at bars like Kingpin and along Canal St. at the aquarium, giving away free spicy Gulf shrimp taceaux inspired by the coastal cuisine of Oaxaca and the Yucatan Peninsula. They also made fresh ceviche with blacktip shark and Louisiana black drum. While Taceaux Loceaux has done seafood specials in the past, the overwhelmingly positive response has led them to consider doing seafood dishes more regularly.

 

 

“The response was really great,” said Del Castillo.  “We actually got to see quite a few people that we hadn’t seen before, who didn’t know about the truck.  We had a lot of folks from a lot of the games who were coming up, so we thought it went really well.”

 

 

Nevertheless, some critics and skeptics can’t get past the fact that the promotion was funded by BP. Del Castillo understands the anger directed at the oil giant, but she also believes in supporting the people whose livelihoods depend on Gulf Coast seafood.

 

“As far as BP is concerned, I think they’ve got a lot of damage control to do, and they’re going to have to reach out to the community for years,” Del Castillo said.  “We didn’t really view it as something that helps them so much as it was something that helps the entire Gulf Coast.”

 

 

BP, like the Army Corps of Engineers, will long be considered enemies of the state by most Louisianans, and throwing money at the problem is unlikely to save their reputation. Still, regardless of BP’s motives, supporting the local seafood economy—from fishermen, to the hospitality and service industries, to the tourists and locals devoted to the fruits of the Gulf—seems to be a top priority for Del Castillo and others, like chefs Emeril Lagasse and John Besh, who also participated in the promotion.

 

 

“Obviously I think BP’s initial concern is to change how people perceive them, and that’s not going to happen with something like this,” admitted Del Castillo.  “But I’m glad they are taking steps, and I feel like if they can become a better company and better people,” she said with a chuckle, “then that would be fantastic.”




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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily