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THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

March 28th

Book Reading: Elizabeth Pearce

Garden District Book Shop, 6PM

From her new book "Drink Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Best Cocktail Bars, Dives, & Speakeasies"

 

Spring Publishing Camp

Tubby & Coo's Mid-City Book Shop, 7PM

Book publishing workshop

 

Gabby Douglas

Dillrd University, 7PM

Olympic gymnast talks fame and fitness

 

Laelume

The Carver, 7PM

World soul jazz music

 

Laughter Without Borders

Loyola University, 7PM

Clowns for a cause, to benefit Syrian refugees

 

Tuesday Night Haircuts

St. Roch Tavern, 8PM

Tonight: beer, haircuts, karaoke

 

Thinkin' With Lincoln 

Bayou Beer Garden, 8PM

Outdoor trivia

 

Water Seed

Blue Nile, 9PM

Interstellar future funk

 

Stanton Moore Trio

Snug Harbor, 10PM

Galactic drummer’s side project - also at 8PM

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


Treme Wraps

HBO Crew Films Final Episode, Producer Eric Overmyer Talks about the Real NOLA



After three seasons on air and a mini-fourth set for editing, HBO’s Tremé is packing up their bags and leaving the Crescent City. While local opinion on the show ranges from love to disdain, most residents have grown accustomed to the film crews and celebrity sightings that began in March of 2009.  

 

The Wire creator David Simon and Eric Overmyer decided to take their affection towards New Orleans and channel it towards post-Katrina reality.

 

Overmyer’s fondness for the city began long before his work on the HBO series. The producer has owned a home in New Orleans since 1989, and he’s spent a large portion of the last four years here. After seeing the ups and downs of Post-Katrina New Orleans, Overmyer said his knowledge bank expanded exponentially.

 

“I thought I knew a lot about the city, but I learned a whole lot about the musicians, the Mardi Gras Indians, the Krewes, and the culture,” he said. “I also learned that I didn’t know anything about the Indians, they’re pretty evasive,” he said. “I think you get a lot of contradictory reporting, it’s been grand to meet some of the people in that culture, really great for me personally.”

 

Even the show’s biggest critics have to admit, Simon and Overmyer made a valiant effort to make locals happy. Simon even wrote a letter to the city published on April 11, 2010, before the first episode aired. His disclaimer was an effort to prepare residents for inaccuracies to be peppered throughout the series.

 

One of the more famous ones happened right off the bat, when a character, chef Janette DeSautel, substitutes a Hubig’s Pie for an actual dessert and serves it to a customer in November of 2005. The most obvious issue with DeSautel’s decision is that Hubig’s didn’t reopen until 2006.

 

Eventually, most locals forgave the show for its anachronisms and missteps; many even rekindled old friendships with people who had HBO and tuned in on Sundays. The crew filmed their last episode on Lundi Gras, and producer Eric Overmyer said his final days on the set were “bittersweet.” 

 

After decades of on-and-off living and a solid four years of residency, Overmyer remains humble about his time in New Orleans and the way the show painted her residents. “In our dealings with people we did pretty well, but occasionally we stepped on toes. I’m sorry about that,” said Overmyer.

 

One of the mistakes Overmyer cited was with paying local musicians. “We tried really hard to make sure that people got paid locally. We made some mistakes in the beginning, and people outside of the community were getting paid when they shouldn’t have,” said Overmyer. “We endeavored to do better.”

 

In addition to his growth as an insider/outsider producer, Overmyer’s understanding of the local climate expanded through his experience with the show. Issues of crime, corruption, policy, and education were all a part of the series. The producer said that if he had a “magic wand” for the non-television world, he’d focus on three areas in particular.

 

“Crime, and the schools. You might have said that before the storm,” Overmyer went on, “It’s hard to tell where the schools are going now. In some ways they’re better, but for how long? Who gets to get in the lifeboat and who gets left behind?” Overmyer pondered on the charter school system.

 

Later in the interview, Overmyer corrected himself and reinforced the production team’s affinity for Hubig’s. “If I had a magic wand, the Hubig’s factory would be rebuilt,” he said.

 

Although the producer said he’s “very attached to New Orleans,” he doesn’t have a magic wand to move his entire family and their lives down to the dirty south. However, Overmyer said he hopes he makes it back on a fairly regular basis.

 

The last shoots took place in Woldenberg Park and in the Ninth Ward, and Overmyer said they “felt right.”

 

“Our last day, we did a bunch of things with Wendell Pierce,” said Overmyer. “We did a couple of things in the morning about Woldenberg Park, we moved down to a school in the Ninth Ward and finished up down there,” said Overmyer.

 

Many viewers thought the last episode of Season Three gave a certain closure to the series, and discussion erupted about whether or not fans would get any more episodes out of Tremé. Overmyer said their original proposal was for four seasons, and HBO almost gave them what they wanted. “We made a proposal for four seasons, but I feel grateful [with three and a half].

 

 

After the next season airs, Treme will have given fans a total of 36 episodes. The date for Season Four’s premiere episode is still to be determined, but it will definitely air later in 2013.

 

“It’s a pretty unlikely show. In a dream world we would have done the Super Bowl and the BP Oil Spill, but it’s been great. I don’t have any complaints." 

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Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock