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Defender Picks

 

DIMANCHE

April 30th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds, all day

Final day of weekend one

 

Breakfest

Bayou Beer Garden, 9AM

The most important meal of the year

 

Movie Screening: The Invisible Man

Prytania Theatre, 10AM

1933 sci-fi horror classic

 

Dan TDM

Saenger Theatre, 3PM

YouTube superstar comes to town

 

Sunday Musical Meditation

Marigny Opera House, 5PM

Feat. guitarist and composer David Sigler

 

One Tease to Rule Them All

Eiffel Society, 7PM

Lord of the Rings burlesque

 

Joe Krown Trio

Maple Leaf Bar, 7PM

Feat. Walter "Wolfman" Washington and Russell Batiste, plus a crawfish boil

 

Blato Zlato

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA-based Balkan band

 

What is a Motico? 

Zeitgeist Arts Center, 9PM

Helen Gillet presents Belgian avant garde films


'Shell Shocked' Doc Screens Bar and Wide


by Brandon Robert

The Hi-Ho Lounge turned into a movie theater last night, setting a scene that has been happening all around the city since the middle of May. Filmmaker John Richie has been screening Shell Shocked: A Documentary about Growing Up in the Murder Capital of America, to just about anyone who will watch it. 

 

Richie has drawn crowds as small as 30 and as large as 250 at these screenings. Regardless of turnout or venue, the intent has always been the same: to bring awareness to the problem of gun violence in New Orleans so positive change can spring from it.

 

While Richie has had separate viewings in some of the city’s schools, his target audience is the general public. Showing children that already live through what is illustrated in the film is beneficial for its brief moment of clarity, but will not have the lasting effect the filmmaker is striving to accomplish.  Richie, instead, hopes to expose the larger community to the underlying issues that have caused the violence.  The film also showcases some of the existing organizations that are already making a positive impact.

 

 

The film mentions the problems of police targeting, the proliferation of guns, the prison system, revenge killings, the education system, and poverty as contributing factors. Richie feels some, if not all of these problems, are fixable by the community. The film spotlights some youth development organizations and political reformers, like Liberty’s Kitchen and the Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana, as examples of those trying to reverse the problem.

 

 

 

Once the film ended, Richie fielded questions from the audience. It is hard to come away from the film without wanting to know what you could do to help.  So, when asked, the filmmaker mentioned a few examples of worthwhile organizations (also listed on the film’s website) and encouraged those in attendance to volunteer or donate if possible. This message of community involvement goes hand in hand with the film’s central thesis, taken from Frederick Douglass: “It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.”

 

 

 

As for the future of the film, Richie is currently exploring options for wider distribution. He has yet to decide whether to go the conventional route of a distributor, or to put it online for paid download.




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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Linzi Falk, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt


Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily