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THE

Defender Picks

 

MERCREDI

May 24th

Jazz Pilates

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 12PM

Led by renowned jazz vocalist Stephanie Jordan

 

Happy Hour Sessions

The Foundation Room, 5PM

Featuring the raw blues and smokey femininity of Hedijo

 

Shake It Break It Band

21st Amendment, 5PM

Step back in time and enjoy some tunes

 

Lighting from a Theatrical Perspective

NOLA Community Printshop, 6PM

Hosted by veteran Lighting Designer, Andrew J. Merkel

 

Free Spirited Yoga

The Tchoup Yard, 6:30PM

Free yoga, optional beer and food

 

Big Easy Playboys

Bank Street Bar, 7PM

Mixing roots, rock, and blues

 

Think Less, Hear More

Hi-Ho Lounge, 9PM

Spontaneous compositions to projected movies

 

 

JEUDI

May 25th

Soft Opening

Royal Brewery, 11AM

Come celebrate the opening of NOLA’s newest brewery

 

Doreen’s Jazz New Orleans

Royal Street, FQ, 11AM

Doreen Ketchens and her band

 

Jazz in the Park

New Orleans Armstrong Park, 4PM

Music by Honey Island Swamp Band + Hot 8 Brass Band

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 6PM

Featuring the funky sounds of Margie Perez

 

Conversation: On Cecilia Vicuña

Contemporary Arts Center, 7PM

Discussion on the “About to Happen” exhibition

 

JD Hill & The Jammers

Bar Redux, 8PM

R&B, rock blues, and everything in between

 

Luke Winslow King

Tipitina’s, 9PM

Support by The Washboard Rodeo

 

Dave Easley

Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 10PM

Witness one of the city’s best guitarists

 

VENDREDI

May 26th

Bayou Country Superfest

Mercedes Benz Superdome, 11AM

Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton, Rascal Flatts and many more

 

Magazine St. Art Market

Dat Dog, 4PM

Happy hour + local art

 

Royal Street Stroll

200-900 Blocks of Royal St, 530PM

Led by the Krewe of Cork

 

YP Family Game Night

Urban League of Greater New Orleans, 6PM

Game night for young professionals and their families

 

Toonces and Friends

Marigny Opera House, 7PM

An orchestral journey through time

 

Spektrum Fridays

Techno Club, 10PM

Featuring J.DUB’L and residents Erica and Rye

 

New Thousand + Adrian

Balcony Music Club, 11PM

Violin centered hip hop

 

Free Music Series

Fulton Ally, 10PM

Featuring Bubl Trubl


'Shell Shocked' Doc Screens Bar and Wide


by Brandon Robert

The Hi-Ho Lounge turned into a movie theater last night, setting a scene that has been happening all around the city since the middle of May. Filmmaker John Richie has been screening Shell Shocked: A Documentary about Growing Up in the Murder Capital of America, to just about anyone who will watch it. 

 

Richie has drawn crowds as small as 30 and as large as 250 at these screenings. Regardless of turnout or venue, the intent has always been the same: to bring awareness to the problem of gun violence in New Orleans so positive change can spring from it.

 

While Richie has had separate viewings in some of the city’s schools, his target audience is the general public. Showing children that already live through what is illustrated in the film is beneficial for its brief moment of clarity, but will not have the lasting effect the filmmaker is striving to accomplish.  Richie, instead, hopes to expose the larger community to the underlying issues that have caused the violence.  The film also showcases some of the existing organizations that are already making a positive impact.

 

 

The film mentions the problems of police targeting, the proliferation of guns, the prison system, revenge killings, the education system, and poverty as contributing factors. Richie feels some, if not all of these problems, are fixable by the community. The film spotlights some youth development organizations and political reformers, like Liberty’s Kitchen and the Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana, as examples of those trying to reverse the problem.

 

 

 

Once the film ended, Richie fielded questions from the audience. It is hard to come away from the film without wanting to know what you could do to help.  So, when asked, the filmmaker mentioned a few examples of worthwhile organizations (also listed on the film’s website) and encouraged those in attendance to volunteer or donate if possible. This message of community involvement goes hand in hand with the film’s central thesis, taken from Frederick Douglass: “It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.”

 

 

 

As for the future of the film, Richie is currently exploring options for wider distribution. He has yet to decide whether to go the conventional route of a distributor, or to put it online for paid download.




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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily