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Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

DIMANCHE

April 30th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds, all day

Final day of weekend one

 

Breakfest

Bayou Beer Garden, 9AM

The most important meal of the year

 

Movie Screening: The Invisible Man

Prytania Theatre, 10AM

1933 sci-fi horror classic

 

Dan TDM

Saenger Theatre, 3PM

YouTube superstar comes to town

 

Sunday Musical Meditation

Marigny Opera House, 5PM

Feat. guitarist and composer David Sigler

 

One Tease to Rule Them All

Eiffel Society, 7PM

Lord of the Rings burlesque

 

Joe Krown Trio

Maple Leaf Bar, 7PM

Feat. Walter "Wolfman" Washington and Russell Batiste, plus a crawfish boil

 

Blato Zlato

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA-based Balkan band

 

What is a Motico? 

Zeitgeist Arts Center, 9PM

Helen Gillet presents Belgian avant garde films

LUNDI

May 1st

May Day Strike and March

Louis Armstrong Park, 1PM

A protest for freedom, jobs, justice, and sanctuary for all

 

Movie Screening: Soundtracks: Songs That Defined History

Peoples Health Jazz Market, 6:30PM

CNN presents event, with post-screening conversation with anchor Brooke Baldwin

 

WWOZ Piano Night

House of Blues, 7PM
Back to the roots

 

Ooh Poo Pah Doo Monday Blues

Carver Club, 8PM

Treme club shifts its weekly show to the historic Carver Theatre

 

Poetry on Poets

Cafe Istanbul, 9:15PM

Evening of poetry with Chuck Perkins, plus live music

 

Brass-A-Holics

Blue Nile, 11PM

Famed brass all-stars play Frenchmen 

 

 

MARDI

May 2nd

Collison

Ernest N. Morial Cenvention Center 

Kick off day of tech conference

 

United Bakery Records Revue

Marigny Recording Studio, 3PM

First annual showcase of the label's artists

 

GiveNOLA Fest

Greater New Orleans Foundation, 4:30PM

Music from Irma Thomas, Big Sam's Funky Nation, Rebirth Brass Band

 

Tasting Tuesdays

343 Baronne St., 6:30PM

Chardonnay vs. Pinot Noir

 

Gojira

House of Blues, 7PM

Grammy-nominated French heavy metal 

 

Little Freddie King

Little Gem Saloon, 7:30PM

Stick around for Honey Island Swamp Band at 11PM

 

Neil Diamond

Smoothie King Center, 8PM

50th anniversary tour

 

The Mike Dillon Band

Siberia, 9PM

Feat. Rory Danger and the Danger Dangers

MERCREDI

May 3rd

Book Reading: Michael Fry

Octavia Books, 4:30PM

From "How to Be A Supervillain" 

 

Flower Crown Workshop

Freda, 6PM

Hosted by Pistil & Stamen Flower Farm and Studio

 

Pete Fountain Tribute

Music at the Mint, 7PM

Feat. Tim Laughlin

 

Erica Falls

The Sanctuary, 8PM

CD release show

 

Piano Summit

Snug Harbor, 8PM

Feat. Marcia Ball, Joe Krown, and Tom McDermott

 

The New Pornographers

Tipitina's, 8PM

In support of newest album 'Whiteout Conditions'

 

Pixies

Saenger Theatre, 8:30PM

Alt-rock icons

 

Piano Sessions Vol. 7

Blue Nile, 9PM

Feat. Ivan Neville

 

Twin Peaks

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Chrome Pony and Post Animal in support

 

New Breed Brass Band

Blue Nile, 11:55PM

Next generation NOLA brass

 

Tribute to Lee Dorsey

Pres Hall, 12AM

With Jon Cleary, Benny Bloom, & Friends

JEUDI

May 4th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds, all day

Weekend two kicks off

 

May the 4th Be With You

Tubby & Coo's, 4PM

Star Wars party

 

Jazz in the Park
Armstrong Park, 4PM

Russell Batiste and friends

 

Yoga Social Club

Crescent Park, 5:45PM

Get sweaty and centered 

 

Cuba to Congo Square Throwdown

Ashé Cac, 6PM

Live music, DJs, and dance

 

Mike Dillon

The Music Box Village, 6:30PM

Punk rock percussion

 

Herbs & Rituals

Rosalie Apothecary, 7PM

Class for women's health

 

Shorty Fest

House of Blues, 7:30PM

Benefit concert for his namesake foundation

 

AllNight Show 

The Historic Carver Theater, 8PM

Feat. Ian Neville, Nikki Glaspie, SSHH feat. Zak Starkey of The Who

 

Jurassic 5

The Howlin Wolf, 9PM

Feat. Blackalicious

 

Foundation of Funk

Republic NOLA, 9PM

Feat. George Porter Jr., Zigaboo Modeliste

 

Jazz: In and Out

Music at the Mint, 9PM

Live music to benefit the Louis Armstrong Jazz Camp


Setting 'Sarah'

A Facing the Stage Interview with Skin Horse Theatre



On the eve of the New Orleans Fringe theatre fest, NoDef Drama Writer Helen Jaksch, met up with Skin Horse Theater’s Nat Kusinitz and Evan Spigelman at an Uptown coffee shop to talk about the company’s upcoming production, Sarah.

 

In their second year of performing at Fringe Fest, Skin Horse Theater is a Marigny-based experimental performance collective that tries a new approach each time out. Last year's Port/Architect utilized Japanese butoh dance and a warehouse setting to engage with the audience on an active level. For this year's production, the aims for the audience are similar, but the environment is vastly different. 

 

 

Helen Jaksch: So tell me about the piece y’all are working on now.

 

Nat Kusinitz: The piece is called Sarah. It’s another site-specific piece. We’ve drawn a lot of inspiration from the space we’re working in. Last year for Port/Architect we found the space before we knew very much about the piece. We went in and walked around and the space helped generate the piece. This one we knew we wanted to be site-specific from the beginning. We wanted to do it inside a real living room. But obviously the logistics of doing it in somebody’s actual living room were not quite…

 

Evan Spigelman: You know we can’t…we didn’t want to break anyone’s nice furniture.
 

 

Nat: Yeah, you know someone actually living in this house would be difficult, but we were lucky enough to stumble across the guys at 1239 Congress, part of the BYOV Fringe where we’re doing the piece.  They had just bought this house that they were gutting and turning into a music space/art space.

 

Evan: Yeah, it’s going to be a co-op. There’s also going to be a gluten-free bakery in the back.

 

Nat: Apparently. But we are…so we are literally going to be building the living room.

 

Evan: Kinda going in the opposite direction that Port/Architect did. In Port/Architect we looked at space and aesthetics and we were responding to that. This production we are forming the space around the play. So what’s been really exciting about this is the folks over at 1239 Congress have been really, really generous with…every time [Nat] comes in with an idea, what about this crazy blah, blah, blah…they say, well can’t you make it crazier? And so they’ve been really generous with us putting up some semi-permanent things for our piece and molding the space to our needs, working with them in terms of what we can do that they will be able to use in the future once our piece is taken down and gone. It’s been really awesome and really exciting not just to see our play gestate but to watch that’s going along parallel to it, this artist’s co-op, go from seed to sprout.

 

Helen: You said the inspiration for Sarah didn’t come from the space. So where did it come from?

 

Nat: It’s hard to talk about a little bit because as we have gotten further in the process we’ve decided that there are elements of the play that we are trying to keep under wraps a little bit, which I assume, you know, once performances begin will be a little more difficult but suffice it to say…

 

Evan: A lot of our interest in Sarah came from an interest in genre where we’re really exploring very codified, very specific genres. Especially the difference between theatre and film. And so one challenge we’ve always been so puzzled by and interested in is: what is the difference between an actor and an audience’s experience of an actor in a film and in a play? So what we wanted to do with the living room concept was figure out how to get the intimacy you get from film without all the tools like editing, cinematography, underscoring—

 

Nat: Right, right. And so we’re obviously doing it in a living room so we have a very limited audience size of 20 people per audience and so the audience will literally be this close [gestures just across the small round table] and so with that type of intimacy and literally being in the same space as the actors you can get down to being very cinematic. First of all the performances I think will become a little more cinematic because it’s less about showing and projecting what you’re doing because you’re so close …If I’m sitting this close to an actor and I can see the way that their pinky is moving [makes a small circle with his pinky]. That can give me information that I would never be able to get if the actor was 50 feet away from me onstage. That’s something we’re very interested in—having the audience be able to have that type of relationship… And in this play we’re creating a scenario in which the audience is literally inside the play and the play is surrounding them on all sides which I think is very exciting.

 

Helen: And so do you see the audience having autonomy of movement in the space? Is it going to be a little more - 

 

Nat: That’s something we did in Port/Architect. The audience followed the play around and there were segments where they were allowed to do whatever they wanted. In this piece they’ll be sitting in one place the entire time. We’re working with characters, and in particular our protagonist, who are very trapped. There’s a sense of claustrophobia in the play so I think on some level we’re trying to make the audience feel trapped…

 

Evan: You’re in this very hermetically sealed domestic space.

 

Nat: And I think there’s something very fascinating about having a small audience; it allows for a lot of things. You can’t really disappear.

 

Evan: No safety in small numbers.

 

Nat: There’s no safety, so I think it will be very interesting to see how the audience behaves.

 

Evan: I wonder how many people will hold their coughs and sneezes and things.

 

Helen: I feel like they’re going to be hyper-aware of their presence in that space.

 

Nat: I mean hopefully we’ll be able to…to create a sense that they are these invisible…

 

Evan: Voyeurs. And that’s something that you know, that film doesn’t have as much of a capacity to do. You look at something like Rear Window which is like the voyeur film. It’s more a comment. You still have the separation of the screen and me being somewhere else.

 

Helen: What’s been the development process of this as you’ve gone through?

 

Nat: It’s funny.  This has been a piece we’ve been thinking about for a very, very long time and pretty much the only consistent thing has been this relationship to film that we’re interested in exploring and also the idea that it would take place inside a house. So it’s gone through a lot of different incarnations and finally we landed on this one story we were all really interested in and we’ve been developing that story together for a very long time. And then eventually we handed that off to Brian [Dorsam] who went off and wrote the script. He brought it back to us.

 

Evan: I think it’s interesting…I imagine that a lot of the other theatre companies in town would say this. There’s no one way to make original work. And we’ve found that every time we do something it’s entirely different.

 

Nat: Yeah, we’ve had to reinvent our process for every new project.

 

Evan: So I think in a weird way this has been the most traditional because we have…before, we have written scripts completely together where we pass around a scene between the five of us or all revise together. This time around we have a playwright and a production team and while we came up with the concept and the story together, now we have those two pieces separate.

 

Nat: It’s also the one thing that I think is really exciting about this is this is the first time that we’ve been… it’s been the closest thing to a strict dramatic narrative that we’ve ever done. We were looking at a lot of Edward Albee because, you know, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? And this dinner party.

 

Evan: And Albee is interesting because you hear dinner party…well that sounds like every play I’ve ever seen, but in a good way. That’s why Albee is so interesting. Because he takes those concepts that were not new when he was writing and he makes the space feel poisonous.

 

Nat: Yeah. Exactly.

 

Evan: Even though the set-up is completely banal.

 

Nat: And that’s a lot of what we’re working with. A lot of the tension in the play. There’s a lot of elephants in the room within this play and a lot of tension surrounding the things that the characters can’t do and don’t say to one another as opposed to what they do say and do.

 

Evan: And hopefully if we do our job right the space itself will become an agent in all those misdirections. We’re trying to find all kinds of ways to infuse the space with character.

 

Nat: The house is…There are four actors in the play. The house is the fifth character.

Sarah runs as part of the New Orleans Fringe Festival November 17th-20th at 9:00pm at 1239 Congress. A practice performance will be held during NOLA Open Studios on Sat., Nov. 12. For more info, check out www.skinhorsetheater.org

Thanks for the interview,

Thanks for the interview, Helen! Just wanted to clarify; we will be teching during the open studios today, not offering a press performance. But if anyone wants to get a little peek behind the curtain, we encourage them to swing by! Thanks again Helen!!

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Linzi Falk, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt


Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily