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Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

LUNDI

February 20th

Glen David Andrews

d.b.a., 10PM

Treme trombone man brings it on a Monday ($5)

 

Detox to Retox

Big Easy 'Bucha, 6:30PM

Free yoga and kombucha for a mid-Carnival cleanse

 

Jazz Manouche Mondays

The Dragon's Den, 7PM

Cover all your bases with a gypsy jazz jam session, dance lesson, and dinner potluck 

 

Blue Velvet & Kuwaisiana & Green Gasoline

The Allways Lounge and Theatre, 7PM

A triple threat lineup of independent rockers

 

Alexis & The Samurai

d.b.a., 7PM

Indie folk duo perform every Monday

 

Aurora Nealand & The Royal Roses

Maison, 7PM

Nealand and her band have a fresh take on traditional jazz

 

Alex McMurray

Chickie Wah Wah, 8pm

A New Orleans classic, belting out fox-trot slot-machine music

 

Bluegrass Pickin' Party

Hi-Ho Lounge, 8PM

Bring an instrument and join in 

 

Comic Strip 

Siberia, 9PM

Burlesque and standup ($5)

 

Poetry on Poets

Cafe Istanbul, 9PM

Weekly poetry open mic with live music ($5)

 

Brass-A-Holics

Blue Nile, 10PM

NOLA brass with a touch of DC go-go

 

 

MARDI

February 21st

Stanton Moore Trio

Snug Harbor, 8PM & 10PM

Galactic drummer's side project

 

Film Screening

Burgundy Picture House, 8PM

John Cassavetes' 1970 film Husbands

 

Comedy Beast

Howlin' Wolf Den, 8:30PM

Free comedy show

 

Water Seed

Blue Nile, 9PM

Intergalatic future funk at this high-energy show

 

Treme Brass Band

d.b.a., 10PM

Benny Jones and friends keep classic NOLA music thriving

 

Smoking Time Jazz Club

Spotted Cat, 10PM

Trad jazz masters play their weekly gig

 

Rebirth Brass Band

Maple Leaf, 11PM

2 sets by the Grammy-winning brass band

 

Crescent City Farmers Market

Broadway Street, 9AM-1PM

Uptown edition of the city's prime local market


Seered Suckers: Pols Laud Louisiana's Linen


The Pelican State is famed her cultural exports such as cuisine and music, but our contributions to the greater zeitgeist also include fashion. Seersucker, the native fabric of NOLA, is being celebrated this week through a series of Seersucker Days. There is some debate as to when the holiday falls, but in Washington D.C., Louisiana’s Senator Bill Cassidy spearheaded the celebrations on Thursday (6.09).

 

In homage to annual, bipartisan commemoration, hundreds of legislators showed up on the Hill donning their finest seersucker suits. The beloved lightweight fabric first entered the halls of government as a product of necessity. The heat and humidity simply made traditional, yankee-style suits unwearable. The advent of air conditioning later changed that condition. However, in the late 1990s, Mississippi Senator Trent Lott decided to bring back the tradition through a formal Seersucker Thursday feted annually in June.

 

In 2004, California Senator Diane Feinstein took the tradition co-ed. She purchased suits for her fellow colleagues. “I would watch the men preening in the Senate,” she stated on the Senate website, “and I figured we should give them a little bit of a horse race.”

 

After a hiatus, organizational responsibilities fell to Cassidy from 2014 on. “Seersucker is more than fabric — it's a symbol of American made products that create manufacturing, shipping and sales jobs across the country. It is also the melding of fashion with comfort,” the legislator declared in a release.

 

New, this year, Cassidy introduced some social media friendly props such as a “picture frame” cutout. This tool came in handy for Louisiana Congressman Garret Graves (below) who disgraced his native state by arriving in a heavy blue jacket instead of linen.

 

Check out some pictures below. (All photos via Cassidy’s Twitter account).

Given our role as the birthplace of seersucker, Cassidy is a perfect custodian. The South’s most iconic suit was introduced in 1909 by local tailor Joseph Hapsel, Senior. He noticed that seersucker was a popular material in colonial British India. In fact, the word seersucker is derived from the Hindi words shir o shekar, meaning milk and sugar. It perfectly describes the texture of the fabric: half rough and half smooth. 

 

Hapsel noted that the fabric held up well when crafted into a suit. Even better, it looked sharp. He figured that if seersucker wearers were comfortable in the Indian climate, why wouldn’t they work in the Deep South?  

 



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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Listings Editor


Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock