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THE

Defender Picks

 

Halloween

November 1st

Voodoo Fest

 City Park, All Day

Outkast headline tonight

 

Gravity A

Blue Nile, 1a.m

Following Kermit Ruffins & The BBQ Swingers and Big Sam’s Funky Nation

 

Roger Bowie & the Midnight Visions

Bamboula’s, 12:30-4:30a.m.

Nola Party Music + 2nd set tribute to Band of Gypsies in the back room

 

Morning 40 Federation + Happy Talk Band

d.b.a., 11p.m.

Funk, Jazz, and Rock from dat 9th Ward

 

Flow Tribe

Gasa Gasa. 9p.m.

Homegrown Nola Funk for your earholes

 

Hurray for the Riff Raff + Clear Plastic Masks & Dante the Magician

Hi Ho Lounge, 10p.m.

Jam out with hometown heroes and company 

 

Donde Wolf + Blind Dumb Pilgrums and Charles Bronsons Bronze Sons

Howlin' Wolf - "The Den", 11p.m.

$5

 

Halloween Aqua Circus Extravaganza

Joy Theatre, 10p.m. 

Fishbone & MarchFourth Marching Band

 

Debauche + Dirty Bourbon River Show + Ashton Hines and the Big Easy Brawler & More

The Maison, 10p.m. 

 

Jim Monoghan's 19th Annual Halloween Parade

Molly's at the Market, 6p.m.

Join The Storyville Stompers, The Kazoozie Floozies & More for Molly’s freak fest

 

Quintron & Miss Pussycat + Ballzack + Manatees

One Eyed Jacks, 9p.m. (sold out)

Psychedelic Nawlins Soul

 

Galactic Special Halloween Show + Earphunk 

Tipitina's, 11p.m. (sold out)

 

26th Annual Lestat Coronation Ball

The Republic, 8p.m.-2a.m.

Anne Rice, SkinzNBonez, 504 Dancin Man, Mardi Gras Indian Wildman John, Mary Fahl, Nightbird, Zebra with New Orleans Native Keyboardist, and The Black Bats. 

 

LEFTOVER CRACK, Potato Pirates, Juicy Karkass, Rats in the Wall, Mea Culpa

Siberia, 9:30p.m.-2a.m.

CRACKTOBERFEST 2014 Punk/SKA extravaganza

 

Halloweird: A Warehouse Party

2735 Toulouse Street

Brian T. Simonson & Poorboyz Productions Presents Epic Live Music and Djs with St. Clair Pizza


Room 220: Novelist Carmen Boullosa at Loyola


from Room 220

Mexican novelist Carmen Boullosa will give a presentation related to her new Spanish-language novel, Tejas, at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 7, in Nunemaker Auditorium on Loyola University New Orleans’ campus (6363 St. Charles Ave.). Boullosa is one of Mexico’s leading novelists, poets and playwrights.

 

Her presentation Thursday will focus on the Mexican-American War and Mexico’s loss of the Texan territory, key events in her latest book. Boullosa is a distinguished lecturer at City College in New York, and has been a fellow at New York Public Library and the Guggenheim Foundation. Some of her other novels are translated into English, including They’re Cows, We’re Pigs, Leaving Tabasco, and Cleopatra Dismounts.

 

From the BOMB magazine interview with Boullosa:

 

Ruben Gallo: A number of your books, including They’re CowsLlanto andDuerme [1994] are stories set in specific historical settings. How do you weave historical material into your fiction? What books did you read to get a sense of what life was like in the period you were describing? Do you use documents from archival sources?

 

Carmen Boullosa:In the three novels you mention, fiction and reality were equally important to me. Each of these novels was born as a powerful and seductive imaginary world—a universe I yearned to enter, where I could give free rein to my imagination. At the same time, I was fascinated by the historical context, and with each project, I began to explore and research the period. My curiosity pulled me in two opposite directions: I read original documents and historical commentaries, and I thought about the past constantly, 24 hours a day—I wanted to give new life to those events and bring them into the present. At the same time, I needed to transform history into fiction: characters and events had to be worked through, elaborated, fine-tuned, and adapted to the imaginary world of the novel. After reading documents and historical treatises, I began to write the novel, and this, for me, is a craft not unlike bricklaying. I’m not thinking of American construction workers, who arrive with ready-made walls and simply put them in place, but about Mexican bricklayers who painstakingly erect a building stone by stone, brick by brick. If you place a rock in the wrong place, it all comes tumbling down. And in a novel, if you put a sentence in the wrong place, the fictional building comes tumbling down.

 

I never feel that I have to be true to history: I have to be true to my story, so that it holds up. My novels use historical scenarios, but they are not at the service of history: they are neither memoirs nor testimonies. Like all novelists, I like reality, and I also like to betray reality by correcting its flaws and ultimately reinventing it.

This event is free and open to the public.




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock