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Ray Lewis, Scott Fujita Proffer Theories of NFL Power


Many have come to New Orleans and marveled at the futility of our utilities, but Ray Lewis is taking vitriol at Entergy to a new level. In a recent interview, Lewis put down the deer antler spray and picked up a tin foil hat when discussing the infamous power outage that left February's Super Bowl in the dark for 30 minutes. According to USA Today, the since-retired Baltimore Ravens linebacker told NFL Films that it was more than just a faulty part that turned out the lights. 

 

"I'm not gonna accuse nobody of nothing — because I don't know facts," Lewis reportedly told NFL Films for the latest edition of their Super Bowl chronicle, America's Game. "But you're a zillion-dollar company, and your lights go out? No. No way."  Lewis suggests the reason for the early second half blackout was the Ravens' domination of the first half.

 

After Beyonce's halftime show, the dark powers needed to keep fans tuned in, Lewis infers.  "...You cannot tell me somebody wasn't sitting there and when they say, 'The Ravens (are) about to blow them out. Man, we better do something.' ..." Lewis told NFL Films. "That's a huge shift in any game, in all seriousness. And as you see how huge it was because it let them right back in the game."  With the new NFL season about to start, Lewis isn't the only retired player pulling back the curtain on some New Orleans centered football drama.

 

Scott Fujita, who left the league a Saint earlier in 2013, penned an essay for the New York Times where he expresses mixed feelings about the recent NFL settlement with players over concussions. Drawing on his experience with the Saints during the Bounty scandal and the Browns during the players union lockout in 2010, Fujita lays out the NFL brass' formula for dealing with high profile settlement negotiations.

 

There was the possibility of an expedited discovery process, closed-door arbitration and the exclusion of a chunk of former players. And I’m guessing there were not-so-subtle reminders that causation — proving a plaintiff’s current health problems were directly caused by a head injury sustained while playing in the NFL — is a heavy burden to meet in a court of law. Pair all of that with the chance to close the door on a public-relations nightmare and an opportunity to ease the suffering of so many former players and their families sooner rather than later, and you’ve got a deal.

However the deal was wrought, the league is likely breathing easy that they don't have to guest star in a courtroom drama as football begins, as they did with the Saints bounty scandal of a year ago.




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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Alexis Manrodt, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

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Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor


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Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

Alexis Manrodt


B. E. Mintz


Stephen Babcock

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