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Defender Picks

 

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


Photography at NOMA

NOMA Opens Retrospective, 132 of 10,000 Photos from Permanent Collection



The New Orleans Museum of Art has almost 10,000 photos in its permanent collection: far more than enough to wallpaper its Great Hall. Curator Russell Lord has chosen 132 for the museum’s first photography retrospective since 1978, opening to the public today, Sunday, November 10. “Photography at NOMA: Selections from the Permanent Collection” gives viewers a peek at the best of the archive and demonstrates the medium of photography’s vast range of styles, uses, and ambitions.

 

Lord emphasized that the exhibit, which includes photographers of many different nationalities and spans from 1843 to 1985, is not a history of photography, which is why the photos are not displayed chronologically. “When you make things chronological, it immediately implies that it is a history,” said Lord. “But this much more reflects the tastes of NOMA and its curators.”

 

Instead, the photographs’ sequence is based around visual themes and approaches, enabling visitors to connect the dots from photo to photo. “Sometimes it’s visual, and sometimes you have to know the story,” said Lord. “And sometimes I don’t tell you.” Certain associations are easy to make, like the visual link between a minimalist photo of seaweed draped on sand, and a portrait of a female nude. After a glance at the woman, the seaweed suddenly seems to echo her shape. With these juxtapositions, Lord aims to highlight the cyclical nature of photography.

 

Why 132 photographs, a seemingly random quantity? Choosing images based on complexity, compelling visual appeal, and excellent condition, Lord couldn’t bring himself to cut any more. “We would be losing something,” he said. The show focuses on classic and historic holdings, intentionally eschewing more contemporary photography; another of the exhibit’s goals is to inspire donors to help build the museum’s contemporary photography collection.

 

The presentation of “Photography at NOMA” is visually striking for its simplicity. Framed simply in black, photographs are mounted in a single horizontal line down gallery walls. The arrangement gives each photo equal priority. A single piece of wall text at the gallery entrance will offer viewers more background; otherwise, the photos will “sing” for themselves. “I really wanted this to be a visual story,” said Lord.

 

Because the show includes a range of photographs both amateur and professional, as well as advertisements, social documents, and snapshots, Lord says that calling it an exhibition of masterpieces would be a misnomer. But a photograph doesn’t have to be a masterpiece to be profound. Sometimes, all it takes is time and history to give a photo stunning context, as with a small picture of a group of German children that’s included in the exhibit. This could be a class photo, and would be utterly uninteresting if not for the swastika to the children’s right. Thus we can’t avoid associating these kids with Nazism, though they most likely had no idea what the future would hold.

 

Walking into “Photography at NOMA,” the first photograph you see is a recent acquisition. It’s a faded print not of a person, object, or scene, but a word: “TALBOTYPE”. Named for its inventor, William Henry Fox Talbot, the photo is a calotype, achieved by exposing paper coated with silver chloride to a bright light source. Talbot’s assistant created the photograph with a stencil of his employer’s name as a demonstration of the process, and it’s believed to be one-of-a-kind. “The word is the image, and the image is a word,” said Lord. It’s an endless circle of reference—like photography itself.

 

NOMA plans to release a “Photography at NOMA” book, including all of the images in the exhibit, in January 2014.

 

Image courtesy of the New Orleans Museum of Art

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Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock