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THE

Defender Picks

 

Vendredi

April 25th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds (11 a.m.- 7 p.m.)

Headliners include The Avett Brothers, Public Enemy and, Aurora Nealand 

 

Underground Railroad Film Screening

NOMA (5 p.m.)

Fridays at NOMA features art and music inside, film in the Sculpture Garden, plus food and drink 

 

Rotary Downs + Mike Dillon 

Gasa Gasa (9 p.m.)

New Orleans psych pop, rock n' roll 

 

Backbeat Jazz Fest Series  

Blue Nile (10 p.m.)

Soul Rebels, Nigel Hall & the Congregation, and more 

 

Nina Simone Tribute

Cafe Istanbul (11 p.m.)

Tank and the Bangas + Mykia Jovan 

 

Andrew Duhon

Circle Bar (10 p.m.)

Local bluesy singer/songwriter  

 

Trombone Shorty + Orleans Ave.

House of Blues (8 p.m.)

Plus New Breed Brass Band. Tickets are $50  

 

Dumpstaphunk + Easy All Stars + More

Howlin' Wolf (10 p.m.)

Ivan Neville's band joins fellow funk bands on stage, with the Roosevelt Collier Band 

 

Bootsy Collins + DJ Soul Sister

Joy Theater (9 p.m.)

Funk legend joins New Orleans' own queen of rare grooves 

Samedi

April 26th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds (11 a.m.- 7 p.m.)

Headliners include Robin Thicke, 101 Runners, Branford Marsalis Quartet, and Phish 

 

Shamarr Fest

Shamrock (10 p.m.)

Shamar Allen & The Underdawgs, Hot 8 Brass Band, John Popper of Blues Traveler, and more

 

Cowboy Mouth

Tipitina's (9 p.m.)

plus Honey Island Swamp Band 

 

Katdelic

Blue Nile (2 a.m.)

Funk, rock, and hip hop from San Francisco

 

Heatwave

Prytania Bar (9 p.m.)

All-vinyl dance party spinning Motown/garage rock/R&B/soul/oldies

 

HUSTLE with DJ Soul Sister 

Hi Ho Lounge (11 p.m.)

Queen of rare grooves spins all-vinyl boogie, funk, and more into the wee hours of the morning 

 

Grayson Capps

Carrollton Station (10 p.m.)

plus the Lost Cause Minstrels + Jamie Lynn Vessels

Dimanche

April 27th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds (11 a.m.- 7 p.m.)

Headliners include Vampire Weekend, New Birth Brass Band, John Boutte, and more

 

Swinging Sundays

Allways Lounge (8 p.m.)

Swing dance lessons and party, live band from 9 p.m.-midnight 

 

Mogwai

Civic Theatre (8 p.m.)

Prog rock, Majeure opens

 

George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic

House of Blues (9 p.m.)

Key holder to the city of New Orleans, Clinton, joins DJ Soul Sister


Palates of Penance

Archbishop Aymond Addresses Rules Bent for Lent: Gator, Fasting, and Faith



Two weeks ago, Catholics were tickled when a letter from Archbishop Gregory Aymond gave Lenten observers the go-ahead to eat alligator meat on the Fridays leading up to Easter. Since news outlets went public with the Archbishop’s 2010 response, questions have been circulating about where penitent parishioners can draw the line between meat and fish. 

 

 

Reason for the Season

According to Catholic teaching, Jesus fasted for 40 days and nights in the Judean Desert following his Baptism. Followers fast on Fridays to emulate Jesus in the weeks leading up to Good Friday, the day on the Christian calendar on which Jesus dies on the cross. By abstaining from meat one day out the week, the faithful believe they are doing the least they can to honor their savior’s ultimate sacrifice. 

 

 

Furthermore, Lent is a time in which believers choose something of value to give up for 40 days. (For more on the tradition’s roots and the transition from Carnival into Lent, read more from NoDef’s piece on Ash Wednesday.)

 

 

Rarely is there a practice in South Louisiana that doesn't have its own local spin. Accordingly, local Catholics have found a way to turn a fast into a fest. For many, Lent isn’t as much about sacrifice as it is about culture, tradition, and community. Churches from Gentilly to Uptown invite hungry seafood lovers to gather on Friday afternoons and evenings during Lent, and volunteers and staff members cook up fish, cole slaw, hush puppies, fries, shrimp, and other non-carnivorous delights. Needless to say, these occasions are anything but solemn.

 

 

One of the city’s most famous fish fries takes place at Our Lady of the Rosary (3368 Esplanade Avenue).  In keeping with the leniency of Lent’s official rules, O.L.R. staff member and fish fry organizer Grace Donaud said, “It’s parishioners getting together to try to make our parish better.”

 

Diet Distinctions  

With Louisiana’s unique ecological makeup, dietary restrictions can be as murky as the swamps themselves. The likes of nutria, turtles, frogs, and a variety of meat broths blur the lines between fish and meat, posing questions for Lenten observers who want to stay good with God. Archbishop Aymond cleared up those questions in an interview with WWL radio personality Spud Mcconnell.

 

According to Aymond, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops have determined that meat, “comes only from animals such as chickens, cows, sheep, or pigs, all of which live on land. Birds are also considered meat,” the document reads. Obvious at first, but it gets more interesting.

 

 

Lenten Loopholes 

Now that the pious have established that alligator meat is Friday-friendly, questions remain about what makes the amphibious flesh different from other swampy species.

 

 

“Fish are a different category of animal. Salt and freshwater species of fish, amphibians, reptiles (cold-blooded animals) and shellfish are permitted.”

 

 

USCCB okayed alligator, but nutria and other warm-blooded creatures that split their time between water and land are still off limits. However, you don’t have to sacrifice your chicken broth if you’re cooking a hearty vegetable soup for the family.

 

 

In the Aymond interview with Spud McConnell, the pair preemptively scolded Catholics who were in their cars, on their way to buy alligator sausage to freeze for Friday.

 

 

“You can’t cut your alligator sausage with pork,” McConnell laughed. Aymond agreed.

 

 

Although devoted diners can’t eat land-bound flesh directly, there’s no provision that bars them from to soaking up forbidden flavors.  Abstinence laws, “do not include meat juices and liquid foods made from meat,” the USCCB declared. “Foods such as chicken broth, consommé, soups cooked or flavored with meat, meat gravies or sauces, as well as seasonings other condiments made from animal fat are technically not forbidden,” according to the USCCB.

 

 

 

Substance of Sacrifice

Despite the surprising allowances, holy leaders want observers to remember the crux of the issue. While the community component is important, USCCB urges fasters to ponder the meaning of the season.

 

“Moral theologians have traditionally taught that we should abstain from all animal-derived products (except foods such as gelatin, butter, cheese and eggs, which do not have any meat taste),” the USCCB document reads.

 

Aymond echoed the USCCB’s sentiments in his radio interview, and the religious figure asked believers to reflect on the gravity of their Lenten fast.

 

“We’re called to abstain and fast for penance,” Aymond continued. “Lent calls us to fast and pray in a very particular way, and when you begin to split all these little hairs, you need to stand back and say, ‘am I splitting hairs to live up to the letter of the law?’” Aymond reflected.

 

Instead of going through the motions, observers should use Lent as a time to ask themselves, “Am I doing penance during Lent? Is it penance that hurts me in some way so that my heart gets bigger to love God and to love others?” said Aymond.

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Ian Hoch, Will Dilella, Chris Rinaldi, Lianna Patch, Phil Yiannopoulos, Cate Czarnecki, Mary Kilpatrick, Norris Ortolano, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Kailyn Davillier, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham

Staff Writers

Kerem Ozkan, Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings

Elisabeth Morgan

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Robert, Daniel Paschall

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Deputy Managing Editor

M.D. Dupuy

Managing Editor

Stephen Babcock

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.