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Defender Picks

 

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


Palates of Penance

Archbishop Aymond Addresses Rules Bent for Lent: Gator, Fasting, and Faith



Two weeks ago, Catholics were tickled when a letter from Archbishop Gregory Aymond gave Lenten observers the go-ahead to eat alligator meat on the Fridays leading up to Easter. Since news outlets went public with the Archbishop’s 2010 response, questions have been circulating about where penitent parishioners can draw the line between meat and fish. 

 

 

Reason for the Season

According to Catholic teaching, Jesus fasted for 40 days and nights in the Judean Desert following his Baptism. Followers fast on Fridays to emulate Jesus in the weeks leading up to Good Friday, the day on the Christian calendar on which Jesus dies on the cross. By abstaining from meat one day out the week, the faithful believe they are doing the least they can to honor their savior’s ultimate sacrifice. 

 

 

Furthermore, Lent is a time in which believers choose something of value to give up for 40 days. (For more on the tradition’s roots and the transition from Carnival into Lent, read more from NoDef’s piece on Ash Wednesday.)

 

 

Rarely is there a practice in South Louisiana that doesn't have its own local spin. Accordingly, local Catholics have found a way to turn a fast into a fest. For many, Lent isn’t as much about sacrifice as it is about culture, tradition, and community. Churches from Gentilly to Uptown invite hungry seafood lovers to gather on Friday afternoons and evenings during Lent, and volunteers and staff members cook up fish, cole slaw, hush puppies, fries, shrimp, and other non-carnivorous delights. Needless to say, these occasions are anything but solemn.

 

 

One of the city’s most famous fish fries takes place at Our Lady of the Rosary (3368 Esplanade Avenue).  In keeping with the leniency of Lent’s official rules, O.L.R. staff member and fish fry organizer Grace Donaud said, “It’s parishioners getting together to try to make our parish better.”

 

Diet Distinctions  

With Louisiana’s unique ecological makeup, dietary restrictions can be as murky as the swamps themselves. The likes of nutria, turtles, frogs, and a variety of meat broths blur the lines between fish and meat, posing questions for Lenten observers who want to stay good with God. Archbishop Aymond cleared up those questions in an interview with WWL radio personality Spud Mcconnell.

 

According to Aymond, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops have determined that meat, “comes only from animals such as chickens, cows, sheep, or pigs, all of which live on land. Birds are also considered meat,” the document reads. Obvious at first, but it gets more interesting.

 

 

Lenten Loopholes 

Now that the pious have established that alligator meat is Friday-friendly, questions remain about what makes the amphibious flesh different from other swampy species.

 

 

“Fish are a different category of animal. Salt and freshwater species of fish, amphibians, reptiles (cold-blooded animals) and shellfish are permitted.”

 

 

USCCB okayed alligator, but nutria and other warm-blooded creatures that split their time between water and land are still off limits. However, you don’t have to sacrifice your chicken broth if you’re cooking a hearty vegetable soup for the family.

 

 

In the Aymond interview with Spud McConnell, the pair preemptively scolded Catholics who were in their cars, on their way to buy alligator sausage to freeze for Friday.

 

 

“You can’t cut your alligator sausage with pork,” McConnell laughed. Aymond agreed.

 

 

Although devoted diners can’t eat land-bound flesh directly, there’s no provision that bars them from to soaking up forbidden flavors.  Abstinence laws, “do not include meat juices and liquid foods made from meat,” the USCCB declared. “Foods such as chicken broth, consommé, soups cooked or flavored with meat, meat gravies or sauces, as well as seasonings other condiments made from animal fat are technically not forbidden,” according to the USCCB.

 

 

 

Substance of Sacrifice

Despite the surprising allowances, holy leaders want observers to remember the crux of the issue. While the community component is important, USCCB urges fasters to ponder the meaning of the season.

 

“Moral theologians have traditionally taught that we should abstain from all animal-derived products (except foods such as gelatin, butter, cheese and eggs, which do not have any meat taste),” the USCCB document reads.

 

Aymond echoed the USCCB’s sentiments in his radio interview, and the religious figure asked believers to reflect on the gravity of their Lenten fast.

 

“We’re called to abstain and fast for penance,” Aymond continued. “Lent calls us to fast and pray in a very particular way, and when you begin to split all these little hairs, you need to stand back and say, ‘am I splitting hairs to live up to the letter of the law?’” Aymond reflected.

 

Instead of going through the motions, observers should use Lent as a time to ask themselves, “Am I doing penance during Lent? Is it penance that hurts me in some way so that my heart gets bigger to love God and to love others?” said Aymond.

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Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock