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Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

Samedi

June 24th

Arts Market

Palmer Park, 10AM

June edition of the monthly market

 

Maw Maw’s Brew Release

Brieux Carre, 11AM

Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association

 

Cajun Zydeco Festival

Louis Armstrong Park, 1130AM

An ever growing collection of great artists

 

Veggie Growing Basics

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Learn to grow veggies for cheap

 

Art & Flea Showcase

Sidney’s Saloon, 4PM

Art and goods for show and sale

 

NOLA Caribbean Festival

Central City BBQ, 5PM

Admiring the deep roots of the city

 

Island Vibes

14 Parishes, 11PM

Official Caribbean Fest after party

 

Mike Dillion Band

d.b.a., 11PM

Some vibraphone, some rants

DIMANCHE

June 25th

THINK DEEP

The Drifter, 12PM

Ft. Javier Drada, Tristan Dufrene, Otto

 

The Tangiers Combo

Bacchanal, 12PM

A mid-afternoon match made in heaven

 

Gentilly Stompers

Bamboulas, 1PM

Get jazzy with it

 

Book Signing

Garden District Book Shop, 2PM

Tanisha Jones, Mark of The Fallen

 

Miami Ice

Black Penny, 3PM

Krewe of Goddesses host a popsicle party

 

Moonshine Taste

Three Keys, 7PM

A POC cabaret series at the Ace

 

Guy Fieri’s Rockin Road Show

Tip's, 8PM

Feat. Cowboy Mouth

 

Unfortunate Side Effect

Banks St. Bar, 8PM

Plus Voodoo Wagon and Bad Mimosas

 

Girls Night Out

Rare Form NOLA, 9PM

A rare male revue show


Oshun of Bliss

African-American Krewe Rolls First on St. Charles



While Zulu and their golden coconuts tend to steal the spotlight as the last and oldest African-American parade to round out the Carnival season, no one can forget about the first float out of the gate.  For more than 15 years, the all African-American Krewe of Oshun has rolled down the Uptown streets, kicking off the carnival season with their mix of vibrant floats and African inspired themes.   

 

“Oshun is the goddess of fountains, love and wealth for the African people of Brazil, Haiti and Cuba,” said Ann Clark, captain of the Krewe of Oshun.  

 

Oshun takes many forms depending on the different religions, such as West African Yoruba, Brazilian Ketu or Cuban Santeria, but despite cross-cultural differences, she maintains all the positives of a beneficent goddess in each representation. 

 

Krewe of Oshun
Where: Uptown parade route
When: Jan. 25, 6:00 p.m.
Route:
START
Perrier and Napoleon
PROCEED down Napoleon 
RIGHT on St. Charles Ave.
LEFT on Canal St.
U-TURN at University Pl.
CONTINUE on Canal
RIGHT at Tchoupitoulas St.
DISBAND Tchoup and Poyrdras
 

“The Oshun symbol is the peacock,” said Clark.  Like Oshun, and the parade itself, the peacock feathers represent an exotic beauty.  The peacock makes a specifically strong appearance in Cuban polytheistic religion and will make an even stronger appearance in the Mardi Gras loot.   

 

“We have the Oshun medallion beads.  This year we’re going to do beautiful peacock bracelets, Saints hand clappers, Saints cowbell, Saints beads, and Oshun lighted peacocks,” said Clark, only naming a few favorites.  

 

When the Krewe first came together in 1996, they felt the goddess best reflected the ideals and emotions of the Krewe.  As a goddess who projects beauty and love both on the surface and within, the Krewe couldn’t have taken on a more fitting choice. Each year, the parade has been a hit, delighting families and Mardi Gras goers with colorful themes and throws.  

 

“The theme [this year] is the children of our future and it really has to do with the professions that the children can aspire to,” said Clark.  

 

A procession of 18 floats and seven vans will represent a range of vocations from education careers to sports careers to music career and more.  The floats aim to inspire young people in the often unsettling search for a stable job, as well as excite smaller children about future prospects.   

 

“This year we are going to have the Rebirth Brass Band.  They won a Grammy.  We are also going to have the New Orleans Saints super fans,” said Clark.  

 

With all that who dat spirit up in the air, the parade has to represent.  Clark also mentions a van contest, where drivers compete for the best look, but they’ll have to work hard to stand out against the bevy of floats. 

 

In the end though, we know what Mardi Gras is really about: monarchy.  And this parade proudly hails to the lovely King and Queen, or rather Shango and Oshun, Taisha Williams-Payne and Damon Payne Sr.  

 

Check out the Krewe of Oshun at 6 pm on Friday, January 25.  

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily