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Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

MERCREDI

May 24th

Jazz Pilates

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 12PM

Led by renowned jazz vocalist Stephanie Jordan

 

Happy Hour Sessions

The Foundation Room, 5PM

Featuring the raw blues and smokey femininity of Hedijo

 

Shake It Break It Band

21st Amendment, 5PM

Step back in time and enjoy some tunes

 

Lighting from a Theatrical Perspective

NOLA Community Printshop, 6PM

Hosted by veteran Lighting Designer, Andrew J. Merkel

 

Free Spirited Yoga

The Tchoup Yard, 6:30PM

Free yoga, optional beer and food

 

Big Easy Playboys

Bank Street Bar, 7PM

Mixing roots, rock, and blues

 

Think Less, Hear More

Hi-Ho Lounge, 9PM

Spontaneous compositions to projected movies

 

 

JEUDI

May 25th

Soft Opening

Royal Brewery, 11AM

Come celebrate the opening of NOLA’s newest brewery

 

Doreen’s Jazz New Orleans

Royal Street, FQ, 11AM

Doreen Ketchens and her band

 

Jazz in the Park

New Orleans Armstrong Park, 4PM

Music by Honey Island Swamp Band + Hot 8 Brass Band

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 6PM

Featuring the funky sounds of Margie Perez

 

Conversation: On Cecilia Vicuña

Contemporary Arts Center, 7PM

Discussion on the “About to Happen” exhibition

 

JD Hill & The Jammers

Bar Redux, 8PM

R&B, rock blues, and everything in between

 

Luke Winslow King

Tipitina’s, 9PM

Support by The Washboard Rodeo

 

Dave Easley

Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 10PM

Witness one of the city’s best guitarists

 

VENDREDI

May 26th

Bayou Country Superfest

Mercedes Benz Superdome, 11AM

Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton, Rascal Flatts and many more

 

Magazine St. Art Market

Dat Dog, 4PM

Happy hour + local art

 

Royal Street Stroll

200-900 Blocks of Royal St, 530PM

Led by the Krewe of Cork

 

YP Family Game Night

Urban League of Greater New Orleans, 6PM

Game night for young professionals and their families

 

Toonces and Friends

Marigny Opera House, 7PM

An orchestral journey through time

 

Spektrum Fridays

Techno Club, 10PM

Featuring J.DUB’L and residents Erica and Rye

 

New Thousand + Adrian

Balcony Music Club, 11PM

Violin centered hip hop

 

Free Music Series

Fulton Ally, 10PM

Featuring Bubl Trubl


Oshun of Bliss

African-American Krewe Rolls First on St. Charles



While Zulu and their golden coconuts tend to steal the spotlight as the last and oldest African-American parade to round out the Carnival season, no one can forget about the first float out of the gate.  For more than 15 years, the all African-American Krewe of Oshun has rolled down the Uptown streets, kicking off the carnival season with their mix of vibrant floats and African inspired themes.   

 

“Oshun is the goddess of fountains, love and wealth for the African people of Brazil, Haiti and Cuba,” said Ann Clark, captain of the Krewe of Oshun.  

 

Oshun takes many forms depending on the different religions, such as West African Yoruba, Brazilian Ketu or Cuban Santeria, but despite cross-cultural differences, she maintains all the positives of a beneficent goddess in each representation. 

 

Krewe of Oshun
Where: Uptown parade route
When: Jan. 25, 6:00 p.m.
Route:
START
Perrier and Napoleon
PROCEED down Napoleon 
RIGHT on St. Charles Ave.
LEFT on Canal St.
U-TURN at University Pl.
CONTINUE on Canal
RIGHT at Tchoupitoulas St.
DISBAND Tchoup and Poyrdras
 

“The Oshun symbol is the peacock,” said Clark.  Like Oshun, and the parade itself, the peacock feathers represent an exotic beauty.  The peacock makes a specifically strong appearance in Cuban polytheistic religion and will make an even stronger appearance in the Mardi Gras loot.   

 

“We have the Oshun medallion beads.  This year we’re going to do beautiful peacock bracelets, Saints hand clappers, Saints cowbell, Saints beads, and Oshun lighted peacocks,” said Clark, only naming a few favorites.  

 

When the Krewe first came together in 1996, they felt the goddess best reflected the ideals and emotions of the Krewe.  As a goddess who projects beauty and love both on the surface and within, the Krewe couldn’t have taken on a more fitting choice. Each year, the parade has been a hit, delighting families and Mardi Gras goers with colorful themes and throws.  

 

“The theme [this year] is the children of our future and it really has to do with the professions that the children can aspire to,” said Clark.  

 

A procession of 18 floats and seven vans will represent a range of vocations from education careers to sports careers to music career and more.  The floats aim to inspire young people in the often unsettling search for a stable job, as well as excite smaller children about future prospects.   

 

“This year we are going to have the Rebirth Brass Band.  They won a Grammy.  We are also going to have the New Orleans Saints super fans,” said Clark.  

 

With all that who dat spirit up in the air, the parade has to represent.  Clark also mentions a van contest, where drivers compete for the best look, but they’ll have to work hard to stand out against the bevy of floats. 

 

In the end though, we know what Mardi Gras is really about: monarchy.  And this parade proudly hails to the lovely King and Queen, or rather Shango and Oshun, Taisha Williams-Payne and Damon Payne Sr.  

 

Check out the Krewe of Oshun at 6 pm on Friday, January 25.  

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily