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THE

Defender Picks

 

VENDREDI

August 22nd

Friday Nights At NOMA
NOMA, 6-8p.m.

Murals on Screen continues with La Perla, plus gallery talk by artist Jim Richard

 

Bug
Allways Lounge, 8p.m.

Darkly comedic play written by Tracy Letts

 

Kalu Jones
Chickie Wah Wah, 8:30p.m.

Blues-rock and Afro-Folk from Nigeria, in NOLA for the first time

 

Nymphomaniac Volume 1
Indywood, 9:15p.m.

Indywood screens Lars von Triers’ sex drama

 

Social Set, Eskimoses, The Local Skank
Gasa Gasa, 10p.m.
Perky funk-pop and folk rock ($8)

 

Foundation Free Fridays
Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Ft. Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, Naughty Professor

 

TNM Presents: Stupid Time Machine
Shadowbox Theatre, 10:30p.m.

NOLA's nationally recognized sketch comedy troupe ($8)

SAMEDI

August 23rd

Big Easy Rollergirls Double Header
UNO Human Performance Center, 5 p.m.

vs. TBA

 

Nymphomaniac Volume 1
Indywood, 6:30p.m.
Indywood screens Lars von Triers’ sex drama

 

Jake Owen
Champions Square, 7p.m.
Pop-country personified ($42+)

 

Crosby, Stills & Nash
Saenger Theatre, 8p.m.
Fathers of popular folk music ($80+)

 

Bug
Allways Lounge, 8p.m.
Darkly comedic play written by Tracy Letts

 

HipHoptions Launch Party
Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.
Ft. Bujie and The HighRise, Rei The Imperial, DIVVVY UP, Meta//Quirk

 

Lillian Axe
Tipitina’s, 9p.m.
Hard rock from NOLA ($15)

 

Papa Mali
Freret Street Publiq House, 10p.m.
With Lightnin Malcolm

 

The Kodiaks
the BEATnik, 10p.m.
Louisville, KY punks

 

TNM Presents: The Megaphone Show
Shadowbox Theatre, 10:30p.m.

The New Movement’s flagship storytelling improv show ($8)


Noble Brass

Grammy-winning Rebirth Brass Band Makes 30, Celebrates with Two Nights of Music at Howlin' Wolf



The band that Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist, Flea, calls “hard as hell” and “free as a ray of light” celebrates its 30th anniversary this weekend with two shows at the Howlin’ Wolf.  Inside and outside the city, people recognize Rebirth Brass Band for its edgy blend of brass, hip-hop and funk that always draws a full crowd.

 

Founded in 1983 by Philip and Keith Frazier and Kermit Ruffins, the group graduated from performing in their high school band to performing on a national stage.  While now the band plays to a primarily adult audience, Rebirth’s initial inception came as a result of a fortuitous alcohol restriction.    

 

“We got a couple of guys together to play at the Sheraton hotel, but they were serving alcohol at the function,” said Rebirth bass drummer and co-founder Keith Frazier, who remembers being turned away from the venue as a result.  Under age and instruments in tow, they switched gears to the only place that welcomes underagers, Bourbon.  

 

“We went down to Bourbon Street and played for tips,” said Frazier.  The Bourbon street fluke would turn into a summer long gig. 

 

“I can remember the first time playing in the French Quarter,” said Frazier, who can hardly believe thirty years have passed.  “It doesn’t seem that long ago.  That was a quick 30.  I’m looking forward to the next 30.” 

 

Over those three decades much has changed.  Not only has their following reached enormous numbers across the US, but they have also opened up their music to a wide range of styles. 

 

“When we first started, we played traditional songs like “When the Saints Go Marching In,” and now we incorporate songs from every genre,” said Frazier.  “We play reggae, R&B, funk, traditional; all types.” 

 

Although frequently on tour, the group that once featured Kermit Ruffins embraces its New Orleans roots with a weekly Tuesday night gig at the Maple Leaf.  While turning 30 at the Maple Leaf might have been sentimentally appropriate, the small venue couldn’t hold their ever-growing fan club.   

 

“Since we’ve grown so much Howlin’ Wolf [fits because it’s] probably one of the larges venues and not far from where we started,” said Frazier. 

 

After Hurricane Katrina, the term Rebirth took on a deeper meaning as the city began to rebuild.  Despite destroyed neighborhoods, FEMA fallouts and funky fridges, music like Rebirth laid the firm cultural foundation that allowed the city to move forward.  Among their many awards, they earned their first Grammy for their 2011 album ReBirth of New Orleans.  

 

Despite their mainstream success, Rebirth remains inextricably tied to New Orleans. The band shares their label, Basin Street Records, with other legendary locals such as Irvin Mayfield, Dr. Michael White, and Jon Cleary.

 

Basin Street's co founder, Mark Samuels, said the milestone reflects the band's commitment to their craft.  "I am amazed as a record labelist that has been working for 15 years that a band has been together for thirty.  As someone who has managed and booked and tour managed bands I know how hard it is to keep a band together and that is an amazing accomplishment," said Samuels.

 

Before hanging up Frazier encourages people to “continue to support live music and the Rebirth Brass Band.” 

 

Friday’s show features the “queen of rare grove,” DJ Soul Sister, and special guests, while Saturday’s show features Jermaine Quiz. 

 

Both nights begin at 10 pm with doors opening at 9 pm.

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings Editor

Anna Gaca

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock