Search
| Clear, 55 F (13 C)
| RSS | |

SECTIONS:

 

Arts · Politics · Crime
· Sports · Food ·
· Opinion · NOLA ·
Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

dimanche

February 7th

9th Annual Bacchus Bash

Tip’s, 10p.m.

Presented by Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue

 

Krewe of Bacchus

Uptown, 5:15p.m.

Party with the Greek god of wine

 

Krewe of Thoth

Uptown, 12p.m.

Grab 3-D necklaces and stuffed polar bears

 

Joe Krown Trio

Maple Leaf, 10p.m.

Post-Bacchus bash

Lundi Gras

February 8th

Krewe of Orpheus

Uptown, 6p.m.

Usually with big musical guests

 

Quintron & Miss Pussycat’s Annual Lundi Gras Party

One Eyed Jacks, 9p.m.

With guests BABES, Ernie Vincent and more

 

Bundi Gras

Hi-Ho Lounge, 10p.m.

BateBunda, Rusty Lazer, LoveBomb Go-Go and Valerie Sassyfras

 

Tank and the Bangas

Gasa Gasa, 10p.m.

With Alexis & the Samurai

 

Galactic

Tip’s, 10p.m.

Post-parade jams

 

Pelicans v. Timberwolves

Target Center, 7p.m.

New Orleans takes on Minnesota

Mardi Gras

February 9th

The Fattest Tuesday All Day Extravaganza

Hi-Ho Lounge, 1p.m.

Music and the Krewe of Booze

 

Krewe of Zulu

Uptown, 8a.m.

Awake? Catch yourself a coconut.

 

Krewe of Rex

Uptown, 10a.m.

The King of Carnival

 

Mardi Gras with Rebirth Brass Band

Maple Leaf, 10p.m.

Celebrate Fat Tuesday with your favorites

 

2 Chainz + Migos

Saenger, 8p.m.

Mardi Gras Madness

mercredi

February 10th

Pelicans v. Jazz

Smoothie King Center, 7p.m.

Nola back home to take on Utah

 

Mildred Pierce

Prytania, 10a.m.

A mother heads towards disaster in this film noir

 

Station Eleven

Garden District, 6p.m.

By Emily St. John Mandel

 

World Music Wednesday

Maple Leaf, 8p.m.

This week ft. Cole Williams Band


New Orleans Test-Driving Bike Share Program


NOLA has buses, and plans for streetcar expansion are underway. Nonetheless, with less than 1400 cabs in a city of more than 360,000, it’s hard to get around in the Crescent City. Thanks to Bike Easy, the EPA, and city officials, public transportation could soon become a little easier with a new bike share program. The initiative is still in its infancy, but the first step marks a major jump for New Orleans as she makes plans to join the ranks of 22 other major American cities.

 

Next time you see a drunken tourist with a hand grenade, put on a friendly face. He or she could be subsidizing cheap, eco-friendly public transportation for us locals. Over Super Bowl weekend, Bike Easy and the City teamed up to implement a weekend-long bike share program that served over 500 people in five days. Under the long term bike share plan, tourists will be able to buy a $5 pass that will allow them to use a bike for 30 minutes at a time.

 

NoDef spoke to Bike Easy Director Jamie Wine about the plans. “There are two different fees, one for residents and one for tourists,” explained Wine. “The tourists are subsidizing the residents’ use of the system.” 

 

A local can buy an annual pass for $65-$85, the cost is still to be determined. “It’s less than the cost to ride the bus,” said Wine. 

 

Wine said the program fulfills their nonprofit’s core goals.

 

“That’s the thing about biking, it touches many different pieces. There are four major pieces [in Bike Easy’s philosophy]. Transportation equity, environmental improvement, traffic congestion reduction, and physical activity,” said Wine. 

 

The program is already in effect in a number of American and European cities. One of the federal funds New Orleans may be able to tap is the Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ). For years, New Orleans’ air quality was actually too good to receive such a subsidy. However, the feds upped their standards for clean air, and New Orleans is now eligible.

 

“There are less dirty standards now, so New Orleans might be able to qualify for CMAQ money,” explained Wine.  

 

The city has already received what is called a “Technical Assistance Grant,” from the EPA. Wine clarified that the grant is “not money. They bring experts in to walk the city through the process. At this point the number of kiosks is not determined yet.” 

 

The overall cost of the “phase one” system will total an estimated $1.5 million, which is cheap for public transportation systems. Wine explained that said amount would cover “300 yards of highway,” and said, “for three city buses, you could have 200 bicycles.” 

 

Bike advocacy carries a lot of environmentally friendly lagniappe, but the bike share program’s universal selling point is its economic sustainability. Although the initial cost sounds substantial, the program will pay for itself in the long run. “No other type of public transportation will actually make money,” said Wine. 

 

The first set of bike kiosks will be placed somewhere downtown. Wine explained that the “core” is established by determining “the biggest daytime population.” Once that location begins to make money, other bike share sets will be built in various locations across New Orleans. 

 

Wine thanked the City of New Orleans for pedaling up to the plate. "The thing about this that's so great is that it indicates that the The City is on board. They're doing a really great job with this," said Wine. The Director doesn't know when the Bike Share program will go into effect. However, he said 2014 is a realistic estimate. 




view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
Erin Rose
view counter
Follow Us on Twitter
view counter
view counter


Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Listings Editor

Lucy Leonard

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock