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THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

August 19th

Crescent City Farmers Market
Broadway Street, 9a.m.-1p.m.
Uptown edition of the city's prime local market

 

Zephyrs vs. Reno
Zephyr Stadium, 7p.m.
Local baseball in Metairie

 

T-Pain
House of Blues, 8p.m.

AutoTune-loving rapper presents his Drankin Patna Tour ($34)

 

Indian Blue
Snug Harbor, 8 & 10p.m.

Ft. Chief Monk Boudreaux, Johnny Sansone, John Fohl ($15)

 

Progression Music Series
Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.

This week ft. Birdfoot and Kate Tucker and the Sons of Sweden ($5)

 

Open Ears Music Series
Blue Nile, 10p.m.

This week ft. Barry Stephenson ($10)

 

Adults, Buffalo Buffalo, Tare
Circle Bar, 10p.m.

Punk and post-rock from NO and Florida ($5)

 

Smokin’ Time Jazz Club
Spotted Cat, 10p.m.

The band visits Frenchmen every other Tuesday

MERCREDI

August 20th

Some Like It Hot
Prytania Theatre, 10a.m.

Billy Wilder’s classic stars Marilyn Monroe

 

Wednesdays at the Point
Algiers Point, 5:30-8:30p.m.

This week ft. Mississippi Rail Company, Johnny Sansone, Collin Lake (free)

 

Ties that Bind: Louisiana and Senegal
Historic NO Collection, 6p.m.

Illustrated lecture on history of slavery by HNOC staff (free)

 

What Is Cinema?
Contemporary Arts Cetner, 7p.m.

Director Chuck Workman’s visual essay on the form ($7)

 

6x6: Six 10-Minute Plays
Midcity Theatre, 7:30p.m.

A staged reading perfect for short attention spans

 

American Aquarium
the BEATnik, 7:30p.m.

Alt-country rockers out of Raleigh, NC ($10)

 

The Pinettes Brass Band
Chickie Wah Wah, 8p.m.

World’s only all-female brass band

 

Helen Gillet
Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.

Unique cellist brings her magic to a solo show ($10)

JEUDI

August 21st

Ogden After Hours
Ogden Museum, 6-8p.m.

This week ft. New Orleans Concert Band Clarinet Choir ($10)

 

One Republic
Lakefront Arena, 7p.m.

Boy-band fans rejoice ($45+)

 

Groovesect, Grandma’s Boy
Joy Theater, 7p.m.

Dinner and a movie—it’s the Joy Social Club

 

Bug
Allways Lounge, 8p.m.

Darkly comedic play written by Tracy Letts

 

Patrick Shuttleswerth Wants to Make You Deaf
Circle Bar, 10p.m.

With special guet Leo DeJesus ($5)

VENDREDI

August 22nd

Friday Nights At NOMA
NOMA, 6-8p.m.

Murals on Screen continues with La Perla, plus gallery talk by artist Jim Richard

 

Bug
Allways Lounge, 8p.m.

Darkly comedic play written by Tracy Letts

 

Nymphomaniac Volume 1
Indywood, 9:15p.m.

Indywood screens Lars von Triers’ sex drama

 

Social Set, Eskimoses, The Local Skank
Gasa Gasa, 10p.m.
Perky funk-pop and folk rock ($8)

 

Foundation Free Fridays
Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Ft. Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, Naughty Professor

 

TNM Presents: Stupid Time Machine
Shadowbox Theatre, 10:30p.m.

NOLA's nationally recognized sketch comedy troupe ($8)

SAMEDI

August 23rd

Big Easy Rollergirls Double Header
UNO Human Performance Center, 5 p.m.

vs. TBA

 

Nymphomaniac Volume 1
Indywood, 6:30p.m.
Indywood screens Lars von Triers’ sex drama

 

Jake Owen
Champions Square, 7p.m.
Pop-country personified ($42+)

 

Crosby, Stills & Nash
Saenger Theatre, 8p.m.
Fathers of popular folk music ($80+)

 

Bug
Allways Lounge, 8p.m.
Darkly comedic play written by Tracy Letts

 

HipHoptions Launch Party
Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.
Ft. Bujie and The HighRise, Rei The Imperial, DIVVVY UP, Meta//Quirk

 

Lillian Axe
Tipitina’s, 9p.m.
Hard rock from NOLA ($15)

 

Papa Mali
Freret Street Publiq House, 10p.m.
With Lightnin Malcolm

 

The Kodiaks
the BEATnik, 10p.m.
Louisville, KY punks

 

TNM Presents: The Megaphone Show
Shadowbox Theatre, 10:30p.m.

The New Movement’s flagship storytelling improv show ($8)


Massive Medicaid Cuts Hit Charity Hospitals, Health Programs Across Louisiana


As the rest of the country prepares for an expansion of Medicaid as a result of the Affordable Care Act, Louisiana on Friday announced massive cuts in the health program that provides a safety net for 1.2 million low-income people in Louisiana. The $859 million loss in Medicaid reimbursement money from the feds will result in state budget cuts that range from closing a hospital in Mandeville and vital records offices to cutting a quarter of the budget of the LSU department that runs the Charity Hospital system. The cuts come because the federal government is taking back money that was mistakenly paid to Louisiana as a result of the federal health care law.

 

During the debate over Barack Obama's much-yelled-about health care reform law, Mary Landrieu negotiated to put a provision into the bill - known in the Beltway as the Louisiana Purchase - that gave Louisiana additional $200 million in Medicaid money. By the time Obama signed the health care bill, Louisiana was getting an additional $4 billion in Medicaid money. 

 

The feds later said the extra money was a mistake that was made during the drafting of the health care bill. The mistake was later corrected, but Congress initially indicated they would leave the Medicaid money in place through 2013. 

 

But when Congress was looking for ways to fund the Transportation Bill that Obama signed last week, the pledge to keep giving Louisiana the additional money was reneged. Congress agreed to provide money to restore the disappearing Louisiana coast from BP fines (via the Restore Act), as well as new money for highway projects. But in Medicaid, the state is taking an $859 million hit as a result of the reduction in payments. 

 

Reductions in Medicare provider payments around the state amount to about $518 million, while the state's general fund will take a $287 million hit. Federal matching money the state planned to receive based on what the feds told them accounts for the rest of the loss. 

 

As a result, state Administration Commissioner Paul Rainwater and Department of Health and Hospitals Secretary Bruce Greenstein announced $193 million in cuts to the state's general fund Friday. The officials said they think they can make up the rest of the $287 million from revenue the state took in during 2012. If they don't make up the money by later this summer, however, there could be more cuts.  

 

The funding cuts announced as a result of the Medicaid mess will result in closings, consolidations and large budget reductions in public and private hospitals, nursing homes, and more.

 

 

The largest cuts come to the LSU Health System, which will face $329 million in total cuts. That's about a quarter of the funding for the entity that runs the state's Charity Hospitals and clinics, among other public programs. About two-thirds of the total Medicaid cuts - or $329 million - will hit LSU Health, Greenstein said. The officials did not detail what the cuts will mean for the Charity Hospitals and clinics, only saying the reductions would not affect "access to care." 

 

Other facilities found out they would close. The Southeast Louisiana State Hospital in Mandeville, which treats people with mental illnesses, will shutter and split about 200 beds to other hospitals around the state. Eight vital records around the state will also close, with the New Orleans location remaining open and the issuing of the records falling to 30 Clerks of Court.

 

Nursing homes will lose $23.2 million as a result of the cuts, with the state cutting their Medicaid reimbursement rate by 10 percent. Greenstein said that there would be no "interruption of services" for people currently in nursing homes. In New Orleans, a post-K Medicaid pilot program known as the Greater New Orleans Community Health Connection, which was designed to expand health care the to the uninsured, will see a $1.5 million redction in Medicaid payments. Also seeing a 5 percent cut will be EMT providers.

 

Other areas seeing changes include a fund that provides resources to families with developmentally disabled children, and a state-run program that provides personal assistance for people with disabilities.

 

With each cut, officials said the loss of money would not impact "access to care" or  "essential services."

 

 




The ACA will not control

The ACA will not control costs. The Affordable Care Act is relying on dozens of pilot programs and demonstration projects to find better ways of delivering care, the results of which have been disappointing. Further, we will still be left with a system in which no one will be choosing between health care and other uses of money. And if no one is making those choices, health care spending will keep rising in the future with all the relentless persistence it has shown in the past (http://go.cms.gov/KuroN5).

This is absolutely wrong...

This is absolutely wrong... The Governor continues to posture himself for the national stage at our expense... This isn't about lazy generational poverty. It's about people suffering.

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings Editor

Anna Gaca

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock