Search
| Partly Cloudy, 90 F (32 C)
| RSS | |

SECTIONS:

 

Arts · Politics · Crime
· Sports · Food ·
· Opinion · NOLA ·
Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

lundi

August 31st

Phoenix

Prytania, 12p.m.; 2p.m.; 6p.m.; 8p.m.

A concentration camp survivor searches for her husband who may have betrayed her to the Nazis

 

Thai Chi/Chi Kung

NOMA, 6p.m.

Relaxing classes in the sculpture garden

 

 

Flowers in the Attic

Old Marquer Theater, 8p.m.

Last chance to catch the chilling tale of forbidden love

 

 

Black Pussy + Ape Machine

Howlin’ Wolf, 9p.m.

Portland-based classic and heavy rock

 

Gretchen Peters

Chickie Wah Wah, 9p.m.

Singer-songwriter and member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame

 

Cooking Up A Storm

Southern Food and Beverage Museum, 5p.m.

Hardback book release and signing

 

 

 

 

mardi

September 1st

Hello Nomad 

Chickie Wah Wah, 9p.m.

New Orleans rock show also ft. Yard Dogs and Paper Bison

 

Open Ears Music Series

Blue Nile, 10:30p.m.

This week ft. Prone to Fits

 

Geeks Who Drink

Freret St. Publiq House, 7:30p.m.

Grab a beer and a Scantron, it’s time for trivia

 

Sarah Lessire

Circle Bar, 10p.m.

Classically-trained Belgian singer-songwriter

 

 

ZZ Ward

HOB, 6:30p.m. 

Traveling in support her new album, ‘This Means War’

 

In The Den: Comedy Beast

Howlin’ Wolf, 8:30p.m.

Grab a drink and catch some free comedy

mercredi

September 2nd

Gentleman’s Agreement

Prytania, 10a.m.

Gregory Peck stars as a journalist 

 

Culture Collision

US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center, 5:30p.m.

65 of New Orlean’s visual and performing arts organizations culturally colliding

 

The Fritz

Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.

Funk rock from Asheville

 

Hill Country Hounds

Maple Leaf Bar, 9p.m.

Country rock hailing from the mountains of the USA

 

Hazy Ray

Howlin’ Wolf, 8:30p.m.

Funk-rock with a New Orleans twist

 

Major Bacon

Banks St. Bar, 10p.m.

Grammy-nominated jazz and free BLTs

jeudi

September 3rd

Earth

OEJ, 7p.m.

Rock/metal from Olympia, Washington

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden, 6p.m.

This week ft. Chase Gassaway

 

EDEN

Contemporary Arts Center, 7p.m. 

Film screening explores the life a Parisian musician after the peak of his musical career

 

Bayou International Reggae Night 

Blue Nile, 11p.m.

Reggae spun by DJ T

 

Brass-A-Holics

Freret St. Publiq House, 9:30p.m.

The classic Nola crew rocks Freret

 

Thursdays at Twilight

City Park, 6p.m.

This week ft. Joe Krown Swing Band

vendredi

September 4th

Mötley Crüe

Smoothie King Center, 8p.m.

The heavy metal band’s final tour

 

Louisiana Seafood Festival 

City Park Festival Grounds, 11a.m.

Celebration of the state’s seafood and music

 

Saints vs. Packers

Lambeau Field, 6p.m.

Last preseason game

 

 

Friday Nights at NOMA

NOMA, 5p.m.

Arts and Letters with Thomas Beller

 

Foundation Free Fridays

Tip’s, 9p.m.

Free evening of music this week ft. Flow Tribe and Stoop Kids

 

futureBased + Carneyval

Republic, 10p.m. 

Get your electronic fix

samedi

September 5th

Super Fresh Hip Hop Fest

Lakefront Arean, 8p.m.

Salt N Pepa, Slick Rick and others take Nola

 

Louisiana Seafood Festival 

City Park Festival Grounds, 11a.m.

Celebration of the state’s seafood and music

 

Disorientation

Howlin’ Wolf, 9:30p.m.

Naughty Professor + Elysian Feel and more

 

 

Bourbon Street Extravaganza

Bourbon and St. Ann Streets, 6p.m.

Free outdoor concert as part of Southern Decadence

 

Crescent City Farmer’s Market

700 Magazine St., 8a.m.-12p.m.

Downtown edition of the city's prime local market

dimanche

September 6th

Louisiana Seafood Festival 

City Park Festival Grounds, 11a.m.

Last day to grab some seafood and catch some jams

 

Mistress America

Prytania, 12p.m.;2p.m.;4p.m.;6p.m.;8p.m.;10p.m.

A college freshman is seduced by her step-sister’s mad schemes

 

What So Not

Republic, 9p.m.

Australian electronic music project

 

September Open Mic & Slam

Old Marquer Theater, 6:30p.m.

Monthly slam and fundraiser 

 

Southern Decadence Walking Parade

Golden Lantern, 2p.m.

Pride and parades


Mary Landrieu Slams Jindal on Health Care


After seeing Governor Jindal's Sunday appearance on Meet the Press, Senior Senator Mary Landrieu had some harsh words towards Bobby J's stance on Medicaid. The poster boy for conservative politics is telling the feds to keep their money to themselves, a move that Landrieu believes is more in the Gov.'s interest than those of his constituents. At a press conference today, Landrieu accused Bobby J of putting the 2016 presidential election before the interests of his own state.

 

In 2010, pundits and politicians across the nation discussed the constitutionality of Obama’s Affordable Care Act. Although the Supreme Court upheld “Obamacare,” states can still opt out of the provision of the bill that provides an expansion of Medicaid benefits.

“Is Governor Jindal just trying to check off his box on the Tea Party’s ‘I am the most conservative person in America,’ list?”  --Mary Landrieu

 

Shortly after the state lost $850 million in Medicaid reimbursements, Jindal indicated that Louisiana would leave the Obamacare Medicaid expansion behind. He did so in the heat of the 2012 presidential campaign, but has since stuck to his initial position.

 

Landrieu and her team emphasized the effect uninsured citizens have on the state economy. Executive Director of Families USA: the National Organization for Healthcare Consumers Ron Pollack opened up the conference. Pollack emphasized how much money consumers would save if Louisiana were to participate in the program. 

 

“If Louisiana opts into the Medicaid expansion, [we will see] very significant economic benefits for the state,” said Pollack. Over 422,000 Louisiana residents that are currently uninsured would receive coverage if Louisiana were to accept  government funding for Medicaid. 

 

Under the existing ten year plan, the feds will cover 100 percent of all Medicaid costs in 2014, 2015, and 2016. In 2017, Louisiana will incur five percent of the burden, and eventually the state will cover ten percent of the total Medicaid costs. 

 

“Traditional Medicaid programs in Louisiana has been provided with the federal government offering 61 cents out of every federal matching dollar,” Pollack went on, “This is very substantial. In the year 2016 alone, the federal government will be providing approximately 1.1 billion dollars in funds to the state’s Medicaid program."

 

The ACA advocate also explained that under the current system, hospitals and taxpayers are forced to take on the burden of people who cannot afford lifesaving care. Ultimately, Landrieu’s team argues, Medicaid expansion will help small businesses and the state’s economy. 

 

Bobby J is showing no indications that he’ll budge on Medicaid funding, and Senator Landrieu accused the Gov. of “fiscal malpractice.” 

 

“The governor’s obstructionism is really going to hurt the Louisiana Hospital Association, hurt their bottom line, drag on their economy, and [it is] terribly unfair,” said Landrieu. “[Jindal] seems to be adamant about putting his political future ahead of the economic interests of the people of Louisiana. It’s very disheartening to me and a growing number of people in our state,” Landrieu said.

 

Pollack and fellow healthcare expert, Moriba Karamoko, Founding Director of the Louisiana Consumer Healthcare Coalition, handled the figures while Landrieu preached politics.

 

“After a while, you wonder, what is driving these decisions?” Landrieu continued, “Is Governor Jindal just trying to check off his box on the Tea Party’s ‘I am the most conservative person in America,’ list?”   

 

In case Landrieu wasn’t clear enough, Pollack came out and said the word "president" in his response to a reporter’s question. Noting that Republican governors such as Jan Brewer of Arizona, Susana Martinez of New Mexico, Jack Dalrymple of North Dakota, and Rick Snyder of Michigan have all accepted Medicaid through ACA, Pollack suggested Jindal had his own reasons for refusing the extra dough. “Governor Jindal seems to have a different political equation, [he’s more concerned for] running for president and making a good name for himself with right wing voters as opposed to the interests of Louisiana.”  

 

Landrieu and Pollack's accusations about Governor Jindal's motives are highly unusual, and they mark a shift in the discourse surrounding healthcare in Louisiana.  

 

The Governor’s appearance on NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday, February 24, was very telling. Jindal was firm in his responses to questions concerning Medicaid, but less direct in his answers to questions concerning the 2016 election. 

 

Host David Gregory asked Jindal why he remains steadfast in his refusal despite other governors’ bipartisan tendencies.

 

“Every governor needs to make the decision that’s best for their state,” said Jindal. “For Louisiana, this will cost taxpayers over a billion dollars over the next ten years,” he said. 

 

Jindal cited a lack of flexibility and unsatisfactory reform as reasons that Louisiana is better off without the feds. Specifically, the Gov has a bone to pick with the 468 exemptions in the Louisiana tax code.

 

“Government cannot be the answer to all of our problems,” he said.  “I do believe that everyone in American should have access to affordable healthcare, but I agree with what the President said in 2009. It doesn’t make sense to put more people in this program [without reforming it],” Jindal said. 
 

 

When Gregory asked Jindal about rumors of a 2016 run, Jindal responded, “Nobody in the Republican Party should be thinking about running for president, we have to win the debate first,” he said. 
 

 

UPDATE: 5:43pm

Governor Jindal’s office issued a press release responding to Landrieu’s statements. In reaction to the accusation that he is prioritizing national politics over the interests of his constituents, Jindal’s office said, “Senator Landrieu voted to cut Louisiana's Medicaid program by over a billion dollars and now she's worried about Louisiana families? Sounds like she’s gearing up for another campaign.”

 

According to Jindal’s office, opting out of Medicaid is better for Louisiana’s long term economic health. “The reality is Medicaid relies on an outdated model that costs taxpayers billions of dollars for poor outcomes. Yet, President Obama and his ally, Senator Landrieu, would have you believe that a government program is good for economic development. It’s a fundamental philosophical difference. Senator Landrieu and President Obama believe that growing government will help grow jobs. That’s not how the economy works.”

 

NoDef received a release from Jindal's office after the original version of the article was published. The article was updated at 5:43pm. 




view counter
view counter
Erin Rose
view counter
view counter
view counter
Follow Us on Facebook
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter


Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Theatre Critic

Michael Martin

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock