Search
| Light Rain, 72 F (22 C)
| RSS | |

SECTIONS:

 

Arts · Politics · Crime
· Sports · Food ·
· Opinion · NOLA ·
Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

Jeudi

October 23rd

The Delta Saints

Publiq House, 10p.m.

“Bourbon-fueled bayou rock” Nashville group

 

Dylan Landis: Rainey Royal  

Garden District Bookshop, 6p.m.

14 narratives from Greenwich Village in the 70s

 

Julian Benasis

Republic, 10p.m.

EDM producter/ DJ to play with Buck 10, DXXXY & SFAM

 

James Nolan - YOU DON'T KNOW ME

Octavia Books, 6p.m.

New Orleans writer James Nolan reads and signs his new interrelated collection of short stories

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6-8p.m.

This week featuring a Fais Do-Do with Ike Marr and Martin Shears

Vendredi

October 24th

Alton Brown Live! The Edible Inevitable Tour

Saenger Theatre, 8p.m.

Food Network star brings his live show to the Crescent City

 

MOVIES IN THE GARDEN: NORTH BY NORTHWEST

Sydney & Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden at NOMA, 5p.m.

Alfred Hitchcocks thriller starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint

 

Selebrating Sierra Leone: Music by Imaginary Frenz

House of Blues, 7p.m.

Fundraiser to support Ebola relief efforts in West Africa.

 

Cottonmouth Kings

Spotted Cat, 10p.m.

Smokin’ swing and jazz music at one of the city’s best dancing venues

 

Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers

Blue Nile 8p.m.

Friday nights with Kermit on Frenchmen ($10)

Vendredi

October 24th

Alton Brown Live! The Edible Inevitable Tour

Saenger Theatre, 8p.m.

Food Network star brings his live show to the Crescent City

 

MOVIES IN THE GARDEN: NORTH BY NORTHWEST
Sydney & Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden at NOMA, 5p.m.

Alfred Hitchcocks thriller starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint

 

Selebrating Sierra Leone: Music by Imaginary Frenz

House of Blues, 7p.m.

Fundraiser to support Ebola relief efforts in West Africa.

 

Cottonmouth Kings

Spotted Cat, 10p.m.

Smokin’ swing and jazz music at one of the city’s best dancing venues

 

Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers

Blue Nile 8p.m.

Friday nights with Kermit on Frenchmen ($10)

 

LSU Hospitals Cutting Patient Services, 1,500 Jobs


The publicly-funded hospital system run by LSU handed down massive cuts today as a result of the state's Medicaid meltdown earlier this year. Across the state, seven hospital operations that provided care to the uninsured are poised to become a shell of their former selves as the state cuts $150 million in funding, or 20 percent of the LSU hospital budget. About one-third of the funding cuts will come In New Orleans, where LSU Interim Hospital in the CBD will see about 420 layoffs.

 

That will result in a reduction of medical/surgery beds to 90, and a consolidated surgery schedule with two less operating rooms. A New Orleans mobile clinic will also close, and the hospital will phase out OB/GYN services. The state claimed the cuts will not affect the new LSU Medical Center that is currently under construction in Lower Mid-City, but a public-private partnership to fund that new project is not yet in place.

 

The entire LSU hospital system will shed jobs, with Earl Long Medical Center in Baton Rouge losing about 340 jobs, Chabert Medical Center in Houma losing 245 positions and University Medical Center losing about 170 jobs.

 

Patient services seem unlikley to be spared. Earl K. Long Hospital will consolidate operations to one floor, and operate 15 beds as a result of the cuts. Officials said this was an accelerated move to shift services to Our Lady of the Lake hospital as part of a new partnership. UMC in Lafayette, Walter Moss Regional Hospital in Independence and Kemp Medical Center in Shreveport will now have 10 beds each.

 

Meanwhile, ICU services will be cut at Earl Long Hospital, and in Independence and Lafayette. Bogalusa Medical Center will close its 18-bed psychiatric unit.

 

The new cuts are the biggest slice out of the $859 million in Medicaid money the state lost earlier this summer. The federal government took back funding that was mistakenly appropriated to Louisiana during the drafting of the federal health care bill in order to pay for the federal trasportation bill. State health officials already budgeted for the Medicaid money when it was cut.

 

Even before the Medicaid cuts that wreaked havoc across the state, officials from the Jindal administration and the LSU system talked about making serious reforms to the publicly funded Charity Hospital as Louisianans have known it.

 

In a statement today, LSU Hospital exec Frank Opelka said the Charity Hospital system has "long been on an unsustainable path that threatens the strength of our medical training programs. Decreasing inpatient volumes and continued isolation from the evolving health care market have resulted in a system in decline."

 

Officials have said the future of the system, including the new LSU Medical Center in Lower Mid-City will hinge on public-private partnerships.




Mardi Gras Zone
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
Erin Rose
view counter
view counter


Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock