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THE

Defender Picks

 

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


Low Cost Locavore: Getting There


One of the trickier things to ‘going local’ was not finding out where to get local goods – during the summer, there is a market almost every day of the week – but simply getting there.It’s no secret that getting around New Orleans can be challenging if you don’t have a car.

 

Public transit is sparse. Construction – or at least evidence that construction might be happening, sometimes – seems to be everywhere. Biking in the summertime is very, very sweaty. Plus, there are movie sets to dodge (lately, thanks to those damned dirty apes), not to mention the ubiquitous potholes.

 

At the start of the week, I intended to visit all of the large farmer’s markets scattered around central New Orleans. But those plans were sidetracked pretty quickly by regular afternoon thunderstorms, which means I missed out on a few markets in Mid-City and Treme (only because I couldn’t get there; they do operate rain or shine).

 

As we all know, if it’s not raining in the summer, then it’s hot and humid. Summertime food challenges in New Orleans….There’s nothing quite like riding roughshod on a bike over a few miles of wrecked pavement to buy some green beans. Without a car, it’s hard to forget that, during usual times, I’m extremely reliant on food sources immediately surrounding my house.

 

Of course, each person’s level of access to fresh, local food will depend on available transport and residential location. But nearly 20% of New Orleanian households – about double the national rate – do not own a vehicle, making grocery shopping a neighborhood affair for many.

 

As the map (pictured) from the USDA shows, there are large swaths of the citty that have either “low vehicle access” or are at least a half-mile from a supermarket. The darkest areas of the map show the intersection of the two. (You can access the map tool here for more data).

 

But there has obviously been careful thought on the part of farmer’s market organizers around locating markets in vulnerable “food desert” areas. Many of the fresh markets, like Hollygrove Market & Farm, align with the “low food access” locations in the USDA map above. However, just because the resources are there, doesn’t mean that people will snap them up.

 

According to Alyssa Denny, Produce Buyer & Community Coordinator at Hollygrove, the market sees few local customers.

 

“Honestly we don't get many customers from Hollygrove, maybe a dozen over the course of the week,” she said in an interview via email.

 

This is not for lack of trying – Denny and her team are currently awaiting the results of a study, performed in partnership with Tulane University, to better understand what local residents are looking for. About 40 percent of Hollygrove households earn less than $20,00 per year.

 

Part of the local hesitation may just be due to the novelty of the Hollygrove Market, which is located in a residential area and sells fresh produce, dairy and vegetables from several local farmers and vendors.

 

“It may be because it looks and feels a bit foreign, unlike normal grocery stores,” added Denny.

 

Timmy Perilloux, a farmer & vendor at the Crescent City Farmer’s Market also explains relatively low market attendance in a similar way.

 

“I think people are maybe, ‘creatures of habit’,” he said.

 

Or perhaps there is a much more straightforward reason: “Maybe they simply don’t have time.”

 

TODAY'S RECIPES:

 

Pasta with cauliflower, sausage and eggplant

½ small red onion, sliced

½  baby leek, sliced

½ head cauliflower

¼ lb Chappapeella Farms green onion sausage, skin removed and chopped

1 large creole cooking tomato, diced

2 small ‘fairy’ eggplants, diced

1 medium clove garlic, minced

1 serving pasta

Olive oil

Salt & pepper

Wine (optional)

 

Prepare all ingredients beforehand and heat large saucepan of water on high for the pasta. Heat a large non-stick pan over medium-high heat. Cover bottom of pan with olive oil and add red onions and leeks, stirring often. Once onions start to turn translucent, add garlic and stir until fragrant. Add in sausage and cook until it starts to brown. Meanwhile, when pasta water is boiling, add in cauliflower and return to boil. After 1-2 minutes removed from boiling water using slotted spoon; add to pan with sausage and onions. Add eggplant to pan and add pasta to boiling water, cooking according to package instructions. Cook contents of pan for five minutes or so, until eggplant starts to become tender, adding wine or water from the boiling pot if vegetables stick to pan. Add in diced tomatoes and salt and pepper to taste. Bring to simmer and let cook until vegetables are tender. Drain pasta (reserving some liquid) when done and add to pan. Add a few tablespoons of pasta water if sauce is dry. Add goat cheese and serve.

 

 

Pastrami & Goat cheese sandwich

I STRONGLY RECOMMEND using Cleaver & Co’s amazing melt-in-your-mouth beef pastrami, which you can get at their retail store as well as Hollygrove Market.

 

Coat six inches of po’boy bread with goat cheese on one side and Zatarain’s brown creole mustard on the other side. Heat pastrami separately and layer on bread. Add sliced tomatoes and sprinkle with salt. 

 

RECIPE COST BREAKDOWN

 




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Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock