Search
| ,
| RSS | |

SECTIONS:

 

Arts · Politics · Crime
· Sports · Food ·
· Opinion · NOLA ·
Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

March 28th

Book Reading: Elizabeth Pearce

Garden District Book Shop, 6PM

From her new book "Drink Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Best Cocktail Bars, Dives, & Speakeasies"

 

Spring Publishing Camp

Tubby & Coo's Mid-City Book Shop, 7PM

Book publishing workshop

 

Gabby Douglas

Dillrd University, 7PM

Olympic gymnast talks fame and fitness

 

Laelume

The Carver, 7PM

World soul jazz music

 

Laughter Without Borders

Loyola University, 7PM

Clowns for a cause, to benefit Syrian refugees

 

Tuesday Night Haircuts

St. Roch Tavern, 8PM

Tonight: beer, haircuts, karaoke

 

Thinkin' With Lincoln 

Bayou Beer Garden, 8PM

Outdoor trivia

 

Water Seed

Blue Nile, 9PM

Interstellar future funk

 

Stanton Moore Trio

Snug Harbor, 10PM

Galactic drummer’s side project - also at 8PM

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


Lindy Boggs, Trailblazing N.O. Congresswoman, Passes


Lindy Boggs, the longtime U.S. Congresswoman from New Orleans who was the first woman to be elected to the House from Louisiana, died Saturday. Boggs, 97, died at her home in Chevy Chase, Md., her daughter, the journalist Cokie Roberts, told the Associated Press. The woman born Marie Corinne Morrison Claiborne Boggs leaves a rich legacy of advocating for equality, and vivid memories of her arresting charm.

 

Boggs, who was born on a plantation in New Roads, originally went to Congress in the stead of her husband and former House majority leader, Hale Boggs. Already well-known in Washington, D.C., she assumed the role as representative of the La. Second Congressional District, which includes New Orleans, following his death in 1972.  She was elected to the next term, and never faced serious opposition over the following 17 years.

An organizer of John F. Kennedy's inaugural balls in 1960 and a friend of Lady Bird Johnson and other Washington wives, Lindy Boggs also had an active role in the work at her husband's office. When his plane disappeared over Alaska, she was more than prepared to take over.

 

"...She really knew, by the time she was elected to Congress, she really knew the district better than he did," Cokie Roberts said in an interview with the House Archives. "She knew the growth in the district and the neighborhoods in the district and all that because, by then, he had gone into the leadership and was focusing a lot of his energies on the leadership. Of course, it was the era of civil rights and the Great Society and all that; there was a lot to do. And so her taking over the district basically is what happened."

 

In addition to being the wife of the majority leader, she was a descendant of former Louisiana governor William C.C. Claiborne, and a second cousin of former New Orleans deLesseps "Chep" Morrison, Sr. Along with her pedigree, she carried a distinctive charm that is remembered in the same breath as her legislative record.

 

"They were running goodwill industries, or they were working in family and child services here in the district," Roberts told the House archives, speaking of her mother and other Washington wives of the time. "And they were working with African-American women to try to make the lives of native Washingtonians better. Dorothy Height and my mother were very good friends. They were doing that while still being incredibly wonderful mothers and deeply dedicated wives and gracious hostesses and running everything."

 

During her Congressional career, Boggs became a champion of civil rights, which was a break from other Southern politicians. Even as the Second Congressional District's black majority grew over the years, she retained the approval of her consituents.

 

She also maneuvered on legislation that addressed matters like domestic violence, equal pay for women and Title IX funding for women in sports.

 

"Every woman that has a credit card in her wallet or a mortgage for her home can thank Lindy Boggs for her legislative skill in ensuring protections for gender and marital status were included in the Equal Credit Opportunity Act," a statement from the Louisiana Democratic Party said.

 

She was relentless in her pursuits, if not the loudest voice in the room. Former Louisiana Senator Bennett Johnson compared dealing with Boggs to the "drip, drip, drip of Chinese water torture."

 

Another former La. Senator, John Breaux, put it this way: "If she wants something done, she can go whisper in (House Speaker) Tip O'Neill's ear. If I tried that, I'd get a punch in the nose."

 

A woman hasn't been elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana since Boggs left office.

 

“Our dear friend Lindy will be remembered for generations to come for her selfless and distinguished service to New Orleans, Louisiana and our entire country as a wife, mother, congressional leader, ambassador extraordinaire and trailblazer for women everywhere," U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, who is currently the only female member of the state's delegation in Washington. "She has set the gold standard for public service. Our state is in mourning but also in celebration of a life well lived.”

 

After serving in Congress, Boggs was appointed by President Bill Clinton as the U.S. ambassador to the Vatican in 1997. The devout Catholic, who began each day at 7:15 a.m. held the post through 2001.

 

When Boggs came home to New Orleans, she lived on Bourbon Street. She inherited the home at 623 Bourbon St. from Frosty Maybert Morrison Blackshear in 1972, and still held the residence until 2010, when she relocated permanently to the Beltway.

 

Boggs is survived by two children, Cokie Roberts and the D.C. lobbyist Thomas Hale Boggs Jr. Her first daughter, former mayor of Princeton, N.J., Barbara Boggs Sigmund, died of cancer shortly after Lindy Boggs stepped down in 1990.

 

A funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square at a time to be announced later, according to the Archdiocese of New Orleans.

 

Stephen Babcock contributed reporting.




view counter
French Market
view counter
Follow Us on Facebook
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter


Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock