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Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

VENDREDI

February 24th

Divine Protectors of Endangered Pleasures or DIVA

French Quarter Route, 1:30PM

Watch this bustier-clad krewe as they traverse through the Vieux Carre 

 

Krewe of Hermes

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 6PM

Celebrating its 80th year in Carnival

 

Le Krewe d'Etat

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 6:30PM 

An anarchic krewe that holds its own place in Mardi Gras lore

 

Krewe of Morpheus

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 7PM

A co-ed krewe known for elaborate floats and enviable throws

 

The Krewe of Debauche

Sanctuary Cultural Arts Center, 9PM

A Mardi Gras debauchery ball featuring gypsy balkan beats, bellydance and more ($15)

 

The Get Money Stop Hatin Tour

Cafe Istanbul, 9PM

8th annual tour showcasing the biggest independent talents in hip hop ($20)

 

Anglo a Go-Go

Bar Redux, 10PM

Dance to the swinging tunes of the UK underground 

 

A Queen and Bowie Tribute Show

Gasa Gasa, 10PM

Local talents come out to play the tunes of David Bowie and Queen

 

Grunge Night: NIRVANNA

House of Blues, 10PM

A Nirvana tribute concert featuring bands like The Kurt Loders

 

Burlesque Ballroom

Jazz Playhouse, 11PM

Burlesque pioneer Trixie Minx brings striptease to Bourbon 

 

Foundation of Funk

Tipitina's, 11PM

NOLA superground band is joined by special guests Anders Osborne & Jon Cleary

 

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1

Prytania Theatre, 11:59PM

A midnight showing of the penultimate movie about the boy wizard 

 

SAMEDI

February 25th

Krewe of Iris

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 11AM

All-female group is one of Carnival's oldest krewes

 

Krewe of Tucks

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 12PM

1,300 men and women make up one of the most satirical and irreverent krewes in Mardi Gras

 

Krewe of Endymion 

Mid-City Route, 4:15PM

One of the biggest and most extravagant parades, Endymion is long enough to last all night

 

Big Freedia

One Eyed Jacks, 9PM

Bounce Queen moves ‘dat azz

 

Leroy Jones Quartet

The Bombay Club, 8:30PM

Classic jazz trumpet

 

Sticky Fingers

House of Blues, 8PM

Australian reggae rockers

 

SiriusXM Jam On Presents: Galactic

Tipitina’s, 11PM

First-rate funk band is joined tonight by Stoop Kids

 

Hustle with DJ Soul Sister

Hi-Ho Lounge, 11PM

Underground disco and rare groove dance party 

 

Rebirth Brass Band

Howlin’ Wolf, 10PM

Beloved brass band takes the stage

 

Washboard Chaz Blues Trio

Blue Nile, 7PM

The iconic Washboard Chaz takes a break from the Tin Men to lead this trio 

DIMANCHE

February 26th

Krewe of Okeanos

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 11AM

Celebrating it's 68th year, Okeanos is heavy on tradition

 

Krewe of Mid-City

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 11:45AM

Yes, the Mid-City krewe is parading along the Uptown route

 

Krewe of Thoth

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 12PM

Thoth seeks to bring Carnival joy to the sick and infirm 

 

Krewe of Bacchus

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 5:15PM

Celebrating the God of wine, feasts, and general good times, Bacchus is one of the most anticipated parades 

 

Sweet Megg and the Wayfarers

Rare Form, 4PM

NYC-based hot jazz, blues and swing

 

Palmetto Bug Stompers 

d.b.a., 6PM

Local trad jazz masters

 

Academy Awards Watch Party

Prytania Theatre, 6PM 

Enjoy snacks, cocktails and more as the rich & famous vie for those golden statuettes ($25)

 

Swingin’ Sundays

The Allways Lounge, 8PM

Weekly recurring dance lessons to live swing music (FREE)

 

LEON + Jacob Banks

Gasa Gasa, 10PM

European invasion from Swedish indie pop star LEON and UK-based R&B singer Jacob Banks ($15)

 

Dumpstaphunk + Miss Mojo

Howlin' Wolf, 10PM

Ivan & krewe bring da funk, joined by Miss Mojo

 

Big Chief Monk Boudreaux & John Papa Gros

d.b.a., 11PM

Golden Eagles Chief brings Mardi Gras Indian funk

 

Jason Neville Band

Vaso, 11PM

Get Up, Get Down, Get Funky, Get Loose


Lindy Boggs, Trailblazing N.O. Congresswoman, Passes


Lindy Boggs, the longtime U.S. Congresswoman from New Orleans who was the first woman to be elected to the House from Louisiana, died Saturday. Boggs, 97, died at her home in Chevy Chase, Md., her daughter, the journalist Cokie Roberts, told the Associated Press. The woman born Marie Corinne Morrison Claiborne Boggs leaves a rich legacy of advocating for equality, and vivid memories of her arresting charm.

 

Boggs, who was born on a plantation in New Roads, originally went to Congress in the stead of her husband and former House majority leader, Hale Boggs. Already well-known in Washington, D.C., she assumed the role as representative of the La. Second Congressional District, which includes New Orleans, following his death in 1972.  She was elected to the next term, and never faced serious opposition over the following 17 years.

An organizer of John F. Kennedy's inaugural balls in 1960 and a friend of Lady Bird Johnson and other Washington wives, Lindy Boggs also had an active role in the work at her husband's office. When his plane disappeared over Alaska, she was more than prepared to take over.

 

"...She really knew, by the time she was elected to Congress, she really knew the district better than he did," Cokie Roberts said in an interview with the House Archives. "She knew the growth in the district and the neighborhoods in the district and all that because, by then, he had gone into the leadership and was focusing a lot of his energies on the leadership. Of course, it was the era of civil rights and the Great Society and all that; there was a lot to do. And so her taking over the district basically is what happened."

 

In addition to being the wife of the majority leader, she was a descendant of former Louisiana governor William C.C. Claiborne, and a second cousin of former New Orleans deLesseps "Chep" Morrison, Sr. Along with her pedigree, she carried a distinctive charm that is remembered in the same breath as her legislative record.

 

"They were running goodwill industries, or they were working in family and child services here in the district," Roberts told the House archives, speaking of her mother and other Washington wives of the time. "And they were working with African-American women to try to make the lives of native Washingtonians better. Dorothy Height and my mother were very good friends. They were doing that while still being incredibly wonderful mothers and deeply dedicated wives and gracious hostesses and running everything."

 

During her Congressional career, Boggs became a champion of civil rights, which was a break from other Southern politicians. Even as the Second Congressional District's black majority grew over the years, she retained the approval of her consituents.

 

She also maneuvered on legislation that addressed matters like domestic violence, equal pay for women and Title IX funding for women in sports.

 

"Every woman that has a credit card in her wallet or a mortgage for her home can thank Lindy Boggs for her legislative skill in ensuring protections for gender and marital status were included in the Equal Credit Opportunity Act," a statement from the Louisiana Democratic Party said.

 

She was relentless in her pursuits, if not the loudest voice in the room. Former Louisiana Senator Bennett Johnson compared dealing with Boggs to the "drip, drip, drip of Chinese water torture."

 

Another former La. Senator, John Breaux, put it this way: "If she wants something done, she can go whisper in (House Speaker) Tip O'Neill's ear. If I tried that, I'd get a punch in the nose."

 

A woman hasn't been elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana since Boggs left office.

 

“Our dear friend Lindy will be remembered for generations to come for her selfless and distinguished service to New Orleans, Louisiana and our entire country as a wife, mother, congressional leader, ambassador extraordinaire and trailblazer for women everywhere," U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, who is currently the only female member of the state's delegation in Washington. "She has set the gold standard for public service. Our state is in mourning but also in celebration of a life well lived.”

 

After serving in Congress, Boggs was appointed by President Bill Clinton as the U.S. ambassador to the Vatican in 1997. The devout Catholic, who began each day at 7:15 a.m. held the post through 2001.

 

When Boggs came home to New Orleans, she lived on Bourbon Street. She inherited the home at 623 Bourbon St. from Frosty Maybert Morrison Blackshear in 1972, and still held the residence until 2010, when she relocated permanently to the Beltway.

 

Boggs is survived by two children, Cokie Roberts and the D.C. lobbyist Thomas Hale Boggs Jr. Her first daughter, former mayor of Princeton, N.J., Barbara Boggs Sigmund, died of cancer shortly after Lindy Boggs stepped down in 1990.

 

A funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square at a time to be announced later, according to the Archdiocese of New Orleans.

 

Stephen Babcock contributed reporting.




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Listings Editor


Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock