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Defender Picks

 

SAMEDI

July 22nd

Ice Cream Social

Longue Vue, 10AM

Plus adoptable pets from the SPCA

 

Veggie Growing Basics

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Grow your own food

 

National Hot Dog Day

Dat Dog, 3PM

Raffles, ice cream and more

 

Cocktails and Queens

Piscobar, 6PM

A queer industry dance party

 

Immersive Sound Bath

Nola Yoga Loft, 7PM

Soothing 3D Soundscapes

 

Paul Mooney

Jazz Market, 8PM

Also ft. music by Caren Green

 

New Orleans Beatles Festival

House of Blues, 8PM

Come together, right now

 

Christmas in July

The Willow, 8PM

Ugly sweaters and peppermint shots

 

HOUxNOLA

Three Keys, 9PM

With Coolasty ft. Jack Freeman and more

 

Particle Devotion

Banks St Bar, 9PM

Ft. Paper Bison +  Tranche

 

Cesar Comanche

Art Klub, 9:30PM

Ft. Ghost Dog, Knox Ketchum and more

 

Gimme A Reason

Poor Boy’s Bar, 10PM

Ft. Savile and local support

 

Techno Club

Techno Club, 10PM

Ft. Javier Drada, Eria Lauren, Otto

 

DIMANCHE

July 23rd

From Here to Eternity

Prytania Theatre, 10AM

The 1953 classic

 

Eight Flavors

Longue Vue, 12PM

Sarah Lohman will discuss her new book

 

Book Swap

Church Alley Coffee Bar, 12PM

Bring books, get books

 

Urban Composting

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Learn about easy composting

 

Brave New World Book Club

Tubby & Coo’s, 2PM

Open to all

 

Gentleman Loser

The Drifter Hotel, 3PM

A classic poolside rager

 

Mixology 101

Carrolton Market

With Dusty Mars

 

Freret Street Block Party

Freret St, 5PM

A celebratory bar crawl

 

Mushroom Head

Southport Music Hall, 6PM

+ Hail Sagan and American Grim

 

Glen David Andrews

Little Gem Saloon, 8PM

Get trombone’d by the greatest

 

Hot 8 Brass Band

The Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Brass music for a new era

 

Church*

The Dragon’s Den, 10PM

Ft. KTRL, Unicorn Fukr, RMonic


Lindy Boggs, Trailblazing N.O. Congresswoman, Passes


Lindy Boggs, the longtime U.S. Congresswoman from New Orleans who was the first woman to be elected to the House from Louisiana, died Saturday. Boggs, 97, died at her home in Chevy Chase, Md., her daughter, the journalist Cokie Roberts, told the Associated Press. The woman born Marie Corinne Morrison Claiborne Boggs leaves a rich legacy of advocating for equality, and vivid memories of her arresting charm.

 

Boggs, who was born on a plantation in New Roads, originally went to Congress in the stead of her husband and former House majority leader, Hale Boggs. Already well-known in Washington, D.C., she assumed the role as representative of the La. Second Congressional District, which includes New Orleans, following his death in 1972.  She was elected to the next term, and never faced serious opposition over the following 17 years.

An organizer of John F. Kennedy's inaugural balls in 1960 and a friend of Lady Bird Johnson and other Washington wives, Lindy Boggs also had an active role in the work at her husband's office. When his plane disappeared over Alaska, she was more than prepared to take over.

 

"...She really knew, by the time she was elected to Congress, she really knew the district better than he did," Cokie Roberts said in an interview with the House Archives. "She knew the growth in the district and the neighborhoods in the district and all that because, by then, he had gone into the leadership and was focusing a lot of his energies on the leadership. Of course, it was the era of civil rights and the Great Society and all that; there was a lot to do. And so her taking over the district basically is what happened."

 

In addition to being the wife of the majority leader, she was a descendant of former Louisiana governor William C.C. Claiborne, and a second cousin of former New Orleans deLesseps "Chep" Morrison, Sr. Along with her pedigree, she carried a distinctive charm that is remembered in the same breath as her legislative record.

 

"They were running goodwill industries, or they were working in family and child services here in the district," Roberts told the House archives, speaking of her mother and other Washington wives of the time. "And they were working with African-American women to try to make the lives of native Washingtonians better. Dorothy Height and my mother were very good friends. They were doing that while still being incredibly wonderful mothers and deeply dedicated wives and gracious hostesses and running everything."

 

During her Congressional career, Boggs became a champion of civil rights, which was a break from other Southern politicians. Even as the Second Congressional District's black majority grew over the years, she retained the approval of her consituents.

 

She also maneuvered on legislation that addressed matters like domestic violence, equal pay for women and Title IX funding for women in sports.

 

"Every woman that has a credit card in her wallet or a mortgage for her home can thank Lindy Boggs for her legislative skill in ensuring protections for gender and marital status were included in the Equal Credit Opportunity Act," a statement from the Louisiana Democratic Party said.

 

She was relentless in her pursuits, if not the loudest voice in the room. Former Louisiana Senator Bennett Johnson compared dealing with Boggs to the "drip, drip, drip of Chinese water torture."

 

Another former La. Senator, John Breaux, put it this way: "If she wants something done, she can go whisper in (House Speaker) Tip O'Neill's ear. If I tried that, I'd get a punch in the nose."

 

A woman hasn't been elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana since Boggs left office.

 

“Our dear friend Lindy will be remembered for generations to come for her selfless and distinguished service to New Orleans, Louisiana and our entire country as a wife, mother, congressional leader, ambassador extraordinaire and trailblazer for women everywhere," U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, who is currently the only female member of the state's delegation in Washington. "She has set the gold standard for public service. Our state is in mourning but also in celebration of a life well lived.”

 

After serving in Congress, Boggs was appointed by President Bill Clinton as the U.S. ambassador to the Vatican in 1997. The devout Catholic, who began each day at 7:15 a.m. held the post through 2001.

 

When Boggs came home to New Orleans, she lived on Bourbon Street. She inherited the home at 623 Bourbon St. from Frosty Maybert Morrison Blackshear in 1972, and still held the residence until 2010, when she relocated permanently to the Beltway.

 

Boggs is survived by two children, Cokie Roberts and the D.C. lobbyist Thomas Hale Boggs Jr. Her first daughter, former mayor of Princeton, N.J., Barbara Boggs Sigmund, died of cancer shortly after Lindy Boggs stepped down in 1990.

 

A funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square at a time to be announced later, according to the Archdiocese of New Orleans.

 

Stephen Babcock contributed reporting.




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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

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