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THE

Defender Picks

 

Vendredi

November 28th

The New Orleans Suspects feat. Paul Barrere of Little Feat

Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Also with special guests Ed Volker (The Radiators) and John “Papa” Gros

 

Tank and the Bangas “Stone Soul Picnic”

Chickie Wah Wah, 10p.m.

Rhythmic soul and spoken word from locally formed group led by singer Tarriona Ball

 

Grayson Capps

Carrollton Station, 10p.m.

Raw bayou blues done right + Lauren Murphy; $2 Rolling Rock

 

Luke Winslow King w/SamDoores (The Deslondes/Hurray for the Riff Raff)

d.b.a., 10p.m.

Fresh Americana from Nola rooted musicians $10

 

Kermit Ruffins & The BBQ Swingers

Blue Nile, 7p.m.

Friday nights with Kermit on Frenchmen ($10)

 

Brass-A-Holics vs. Mainline

Blue Nile, 11p.m.

Dueling brass

 

DJ Black Pearl

Blue Nile Balcony Room, 1a.m.

Two nights of EDM from the princess of Indian dj’s

 

Teairra Mari: All Black Affair

House of Blues, 11p.m.

Presented by Tscolee & Loft 360 Society she's sung w/ Gucci Mane & Soulja Boy

 

Lalah Hathaway, Najee, Anthony David

Saenger Theatre, 7:30p.m.

Grammy-winning singer brings soul to the Saenger

 

Bayou Classic Golf Tournament

Joe Bartholomew Golf Course (Pontchartrain Park), 10a.m.

Test your driving and putting skills in this bonafide local tournament

 

Career & College Fair

Hyatt Regency Hotel, 10a.m.-3p.m.

Part of Bayou Classic’s events helping companies and graduates connect

 

Battle of the Bands And Greek Show

Superdome, 6p.m.

A decades long rivalry features a battle of school marching bands in preparation for tomorrow’s big game

 

Marc Broussard

Southport Music Hall, 8p.m.

Son of Boogie King’s Ted Broussard this cajun’s voice is full of well-placed soul

 

Black Friday Fiasco

Banks St. Bar, 10p.m.-3a.m.

A tribute to the Ramones with sideshows by lydia Treats, Pope Matt Thomas and burlesque from Xena Zeit-Geist

 

 

Samedi

November 29th

Water Isaacson - The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers Geniuses, and Geeks Created a Digital Revolution 

Newman, 1-3p.m.

Hear author of Steve Jobs speak about pioneer of computer programming Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s daughter and other innovators of the digital age

 

Cedric Burnside Project ft Garry Burnside and Gravy

Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Catch this Blues Hall of Famer uptown

 

Little Freddie King

The Beatnik, 9p.m.

Join this class act local bluesman in Central City

 

FKA Twigs

Republic, 9p.m.

The sexiest electronic R&B show you’ll probably ever go to

 

Build Your Own Bloody Mary Bar

The Country Club, 10a.m.-3p.m.

Do it how you live it + $10 bottomless Mimosas every Sat and Sun

 

DJ Black Pearl

Blue Nile Balcony Room, 1a.m.

Two nights of EDM from the princess of Indian dj’s

 

Hustle w/ DJ Soul Sister

Hi Ho Lounge, 9p.m.-1a.m.

Get ya hustle on to humble resident DJ who spins it how she lives it

 

John Boutte

d.b.a., 8p.m.

Witness local jazz vocalist’s voice floating on Frenchmen ($10)

 

Funk Monkey

d.b.a., 10p.m.

Second-line funk and dank boogaloo groove made to make ya move ya feet

 

Eric Lindell

d.b.a., 11p.m.

San Franciscan native turned Cajun sifts through elements of blues and soul $15

 

Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue

Siberia, 10p.m.

Authentic N.O. honky-tonk rockgal

 

Down

Southport Hall, 7p.m.

Philip Anselmo's local metal cult 

 

Bayou Classic

Superdome, 1:30p.m.

Rivals Southern University and Grambling State duke it out for the 41st time in this annually played game

 

Fan Fest

Champions Square, 9a.m.-1p.m.

Music outside da dome featuring 5th Ward Weebie and more

 

Lindy Boggs, Trailblazing N.O. Congresswoman, Passes


Lindy Boggs, the longtime U.S. Congresswoman from New Orleans who was the first woman to be elected to the House from Louisiana, died Saturday. Boggs, 97, died at her home in Chevy Chase, Md., her daughter, the journalist Cokie Roberts, told the Associated Press. The woman born Marie Corinne Morrison Claiborne Boggs leaves a rich legacy of advocating for equality, and vivid memories of her arresting charm.

 

Boggs, who was born on a plantation in New Roads, originally went to Congress in the stead of her husband and former House majority leader, Hale Boggs. Already well-known in Washington, D.C., she assumed the role as representative of the La. Second Congressional District, which includes New Orleans, following his death in 1972.  She was elected to the next term, and never faced serious opposition over the following 17 years.

An organizer of John F. Kennedy's inaugural balls in 1960 and a friend of Lady Bird Johnson and other Washington wives, Lindy Boggs also had an active role in the work at her husband's office. When his plane disappeared over Alaska, she was more than prepared to take over.

 

"...She really knew, by the time she was elected to Congress, she really knew the district better than he did," Cokie Roberts said in an interview with the House Archives. "She knew the growth in the district and the neighborhoods in the district and all that because, by then, he had gone into the leadership and was focusing a lot of his energies on the leadership. Of course, it was the era of civil rights and the Great Society and all that; there was a lot to do. And so her taking over the district basically is what happened."

 

In addition to being the wife of the majority leader, she was a descendant of former Louisiana governor William C.C. Claiborne, and a second cousin of former New Orleans deLesseps "Chep" Morrison, Sr. Along with her pedigree, she carried a distinctive charm that is remembered in the same breath as her legislative record.

 

"They were running goodwill industries, or they were working in family and child services here in the district," Roberts told the House archives, speaking of her mother and other Washington wives of the time. "And they were working with African-American women to try to make the lives of native Washingtonians better. Dorothy Height and my mother were very good friends. They were doing that while still being incredibly wonderful mothers and deeply dedicated wives and gracious hostesses and running everything."

 

During her Congressional career, Boggs became a champion of civil rights, which was a break from other Southern politicians. Even as the Second Congressional District's black majority grew over the years, she retained the approval of her consituents.

 

She also maneuvered on legislation that addressed matters like domestic violence, equal pay for women and Title IX funding for women in sports.

 

"Every woman that has a credit card in her wallet or a mortgage for her home can thank Lindy Boggs for her legislative skill in ensuring protections for gender and marital status were included in the Equal Credit Opportunity Act," a statement from the Louisiana Democratic Party said.

 

She was relentless in her pursuits, if not the loudest voice in the room. Former Louisiana Senator Bennett Johnson compared dealing with Boggs to the "drip, drip, drip of Chinese water torture."

 

Another former La. Senator, John Breaux, put it this way: "If she wants something done, she can go whisper in (House Speaker) Tip O'Neill's ear. If I tried that, I'd get a punch in the nose."

 

A woman hasn't been elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana since Boggs left office.

 

“Our dear friend Lindy will be remembered for generations to come for her selfless and distinguished service to New Orleans, Louisiana and our entire country as a wife, mother, congressional leader, ambassador extraordinaire and trailblazer for women everywhere," U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, who is currently the only female member of the state's delegation in Washington. "She has set the gold standard for public service. Our state is in mourning but also in celebration of a life well lived.”

 

After serving in Congress, Boggs was appointed by President Bill Clinton as the U.S. ambassador to the Vatican in 1997. The devout Catholic, who began each day at 7:15 a.m. held the post through 2001.

 

When Boggs came home to New Orleans, she lived on Bourbon Street. She inherited the home at 623 Bourbon St. from Frosty Maybert Morrison Blackshear in 1972, and still held the residence until 2010, when she relocated permanently to the Beltway.

 

Boggs is survived by two children, Cokie Roberts and the D.C. lobbyist Thomas Hale Boggs Jr. Her first daughter, former mayor of Princeton, N.J., Barbara Boggs Sigmund, died of cancer shortly after Lindy Boggs stepped down in 1990.

 

A funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square at a time to be announced later, according to the Archdiocese of New Orleans.

 

Stephen Babcock contributed reporting.




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock