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THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

March 28th

Book Reading: Elizabeth Pearce

Garden District Book Shop, 6PM

From her new book "Drink Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Best Cocktail Bars, Dives, & Speakeasies"

 

Spring Publishing Camp

Tubby & Coo's Mid-City Book Shop, 7PM

Book publishing workshop

 

Gabby Douglas

Dillrd University, 7PM

Olympic gymnast talks fame and fitness

 

Laelume

The Carver, 7PM

World soul jazz music

 

Laughter Without Borders

Loyola University, 7PM

Clowns for a cause, to benefit Syrian refugees

 

Tuesday Night Haircuts

St. Roch Tavern, 8PM

Tonight: beer, haircuts, karaoke

 

Thinkin' With Lincoln 

Bayou Beer Garden, 8PM

Outdoor trivia

 

Water Seed

Blue Nile, 9PM

Interstellar future funk

 

Stanton Moore Trio

Snug Harbor, 10PM

Galactic drummer’s side project - also at 8PM

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


Landrieu Dishes Food Truck Compromise


Updated 3:55 p.m.

After vetoing a proposed food truck ordinance, Mayor Mitch has released a revised proposal of a pilot program that expand mobile meal opportunities in the Crescent City. The changes come after a yearlong debate on the issue, and are designed to streamline business operations for street vendors, especially those on wheels. Food truck operators were involved in drafting the new legislation, and are onboard with the changes, according to a food truck operator who has been involved with the process since the beginning.

 

Council Vice President Stacy Head championed the movement to increase permitting, decrease regulations, and revise guidelines for food truck operators. Head and District B Councilmember LaToya Cantrell authored the new legislation on behalf of the city.

 

In keeping with her vote in favor of the initial food truck ordinance that was eventually vetoed, Cantrell seems to have come on board after expressing concerns over proximity to other restaurants, restroom and sanitation accommodations, and insurance issues in a previous City Council meeting.

 

Similar to the vetoed changes, the new proposal ups permit limits by 100, and retains the zoning map of approved locations for food trucks to hawk their goods. Under the legislation, four-wheeled fare will be able to set up in parts of the Biomedical District, the Treme, and the CBD. However, Frenchmen Street and the CBD between Poydras and Howard are still off limits.

 

In the initial legislation, there was substantial debate over the distance a food truck should be allowed to operate from a stationary restaurant. Originally, the Council proposed 100 feet. According to the City's release, that provision caused the veto, and has been eliminated because it is "unconstitutional."

 

Food truck operators opposed the requirement because it gave them less freedom to operate, and the move was primarily championed by brick-and-mortar restaurant owners. Rachel Billow, who runs La Cocinita Food Truck and has been working with officials on the legislation as a member of the New Orleans Food Truck Coalition, said the veto ended up beng a "blessing in disguise."

 

"It turned out to work in our favor because now they're eliminating that proximity restriction entirely," she said Friday.

 

With new protections in place, food trucks will be able to apply to operate in areas currently banned to mobile restos if such neighborhoods qualify as “food deserts.”

 

The new legislation also contains a provision where food truck operators will have the chance obtain a permit to set up in certain areas. The mobile restarauants can apply for permits to post up at locations like the soutbound side of N. Rampart between Esplanade and Canal Street, as well as on Elk/Loyola between Cleveland and Howard. In those spots, No Parking signs would be posted and the spots would be reserved for whichever food truck pays the City for the permit.

 

"Essentially you're renting the spot from the city," Billow said. "So a lot of those complaints about us not paying rent get addressed by the idea that we're paying for that parking spot."

 

Some areas would be subject to “franchise agreements,” essentially permission from the Department of Public Works. Food truck operators must apply for specific locations on specific days, and the DPW will authorize issue recommendations to City Council based on traffic analysis.

 

The latest proposal also eliminates a hastily-agreed upon requirement that sprang up during the marathon City Council meeting that produced the eventual vote on the first piece of food truck legislation. The legislation eliminates a requirement that says food trucks must park within 200 ft. of a bathroom. Billow called that provision "overkill" since the issue was over a proximity to sinks, and food trucks are required by the state to have wash stations onboard.

 

Landrieu ensures food truck advocates that the proposal will expand the mobile market. "Working with the Council and all stakeholders involved, I am confident that these new revisions will put current mobile food vendors on a level playing field and provide opportunities for more investment,” said Landrieu in a statement.

 

The ordinance expands to all mobile food vendors, not just the trucks. Stationary vendors, ice cream vendors, and foot, pushcart, and animal-drawn businesses are all included.

 

Despite the veto, Billow said the Landrieu administration worked with the food trucks on the revised legislation. The mayor's administration has also talked to City Council members ahead of time to assuage any potential concerns, Billow said. The food truck operator said she is glad that the process has been collaborative, even if messy. That will help New Orleans avoid restaurant-food truck battles that have taken place in other cities, she said.

 

"Instead of fighting the politicians we're working with them," she said.

 

The new proposal will go before the City Council next week.




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Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock