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THE

Defender Picks

 

Mardi

October 21st

Wayne Curtis: The Last Great Walk

Garden District Bookshop, 6p.m.

A story about the first person to walk across from New York to San Francisco

 

Warpaint with Liam Finn

Republic, 8p.m.

Los Angeles rock band celebrating second album release

 

Do the Right Thing

Dillard University Campus, 2601 Gentilly Blvd, 7p.m.

Spike Lee’s 24-hour Brooklyn drama to screen at Dillard

 

Meschiya Lake and the Little Big Horns

Spotted Cat, 6p.m.

Jazz singer with a vintage twist

 

Mercedi

October 22nd

New Orleans Beer: A Hoppy History of Big Easy Brewing (Old U.S. Mint, 7 p.m.)

A tasting and lecture with two New Orleans brewmasters

 

Macy Gray with The Way Tour + The Honorable South + Cory Nokey

Tipitina’s, 8:30p.m.

Soulful chanteuse to enchant audiences at Tip’s

 

Susan Morse: The Dog Stays in the Picture

Garden District Bookshop, 6p.m.

Susan Morse discusses and signs her book

 

“Franklin, Armfield, and Ballard: The Men Who Made the Domestic Slave Trade into Big Business” a lecture with Joshua D. Rothman

THNOC, 6p.m.

Rothman to discuss three men who dealt in the slave trade during the 19th century

 

Crescent City Farmers Market

French Market, 2p.m – 6p.m.

Brand new French Quarter edition of the city's prime local market

Jeudi

October 23rd

The Delta Saints

Publiq House, 10p.m.

“Bourbon-fueled bayou rock” Nashville group

 

Dylan Landis: Rainey Royal  

Garden District Bookshop, 6p.m.

14 narratives from Greenwich Village in the 70s

 

Julian Benasis

Republic, 10p.m.

EDM producter/ DJ to play with Buck 10, DXXXY & SFAM

 

James Nolan - YOU DON'T KNOW ME

Octavia Books, 6p.m.

New Orleans writer James Nolan reads and signs his new interrelated collection of short stories

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6-8p.m.

This week featuring a Fais Do-Do with Ike Marr and Martin Shears

Vendredi

October 24th

Alton Brown Live! The Edible Inevitable Tour

Saenger Theatre, 8p.m.

Food Network star brings his live show to the Crescent City

 

MOVIES IN THE GARDEN: NORTH BY NORTHWEST

Sydney & Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden at NOMA, 5p.m.

Alfred Hitchcocks thriller starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint

 

Selebrating Sierra Leone: Music by Imaginary Frenz

House of Blues, 7p.m.

Fundraiser to support Ebola relief efforts in West Africa.

 

Cottonmouth Kings

Spotted Cat, 10p.m.

Smokin’ swing and jazz music at one of the city’s best dancing venues

 

Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers

Blue Nile 8p.m.

Friday nights with Kermit on Frenchmen ($10)


Laid-Off Times-Picayune Employees Sue Newspaper, Parent Company Over Now-Defunct Job Security Pledge


Seven former longtime employees of The Times-Picayune in New Orleans who were laid off from their jobs in the fall of 2012 during corporate owner Advance Publications’ radical restructuring of the newspaper and more than a dozen others it owns around the country have filed suit against the newspaper and Advance, alleging “unlawful employment practices.”

 

The suits, filed individually in Orleans Parish Civil District Court Wednesday, allege that the companies violated Advance’s now-rescinded Pledge, an extraordinary and unusual job security pact the company’s controlling Newhouse media family enacted nearly 50 years ago to keep organized labor at bay at its newspapers stretching from Portland, Oregon, to Mobile, Alabama. The Pledge was rescinded in early 2010 amid a freefall in the U.S. newspaper industry that sent once highly lucrative profit margins plummeting.

 

Metairie attorneys Charles Taylor and Edmund W. Golden, who filed the suits on behalf of the employees, did not return voice mail messages seeking comment. Neither Times-Picayune Publisher Ricky Mathews nor Advance executive Steven Newhouse responded to email requests for interviews, and attempts to contact several of the plaintiffs also were unsuccessful. A person familiar with the lawsuits said that additional suits are expected, but that the initial seven were filed because they were regarded as among the strongest legally of potential cases.

 

The seven employees suing the companies worked in a variety of departments, from the newsroom to IT, for a combined total of more than 165 years, with tenures of between 15 and 40 years. The suits assert that the employees were protected by the Pledge, but were terminated when Advance undertook its dramatic “digital first” restructuring at The Times-Picayune in the fall of 2012.

 

None were given an opportunity to reapply for their jobs and each was then replaced by “a younger, lesser-paid employee,” the near-identical suits assert. The suits also directly allege violations the Age Discrimination in Employment Act in 1967, saying Advance "conspired to rid their newspapers of older workers."

 

The plaintiffs are: newspaper stuffer helper Keith Catalanotto; graphic artist Patricia Gonzalez; reporter Vivian Hernandez; graphic designer Aileen Kelly; systems analyst Ulpiano Lugo advertising floater Patricia Pitt; and copy editor Stephanie Stroud Naylor.

 

When it was originally instituted in the mid-1960s, the Pledge promised employees would not lose their jobs “because of technological changes or economic conditions so long as the newspaper continues to publish and [employees] are willing to retrain for another job, if necessary.” It was later modified to include only permanent, non-union employees of daily newspapers published in newsprint form. This revision clearly foreshadowed the changes that would include mass layoffs at Advance newspapers from coast-to-coast in late 2012 and early 2013, and make many three-or-four-day-a-week publications.

 

Wednesday’s suits weren’t the first time the company has tangled with employees over the Pledge.

 

In August 2009, former publisher of the Advance-owned Mobile, Ala. Press-Register, Howard Bronson, 72, was dismissed from his $745,000-a-year position in illegal violation of the Pledge, he contended in a $7.3 million lawsuit he brought against the newspaper and Advance. During the subsequent 2011 trial, Bronson testified that he agreed to relocate and become the Press-Register’s publisher at 55 only after repeated assurances from longtime Advance newspaper top executive Donald Newhouse and his nephew, Advance executive vice president Mark Newhouse, that he would be covered by the Pledge and would be free to work as long as he wished.

 

In pre-trial motions regarding depositions related to the trial, Bronson’s attorney, Vince Kilborn, contended that the company feared the precedent the case would set for scores of Advance employees previously covered by the Pledge, who had been or would be laid off after its revocation. (The Pledge was revoked between Bronson filing his suit and it coming to trial.)

 

The suit was settled out of court in April 2011 for an undisclosed sum, shortly before the jury was to hear closing arguments.

 

How concerned the secretive Newhouse family is about residual liability related to the Pledge is presumably known only by family members, a handful of trusted lieutenants and their legions of attorneys. But at least some industry observers have speculated that there is reason for concern. “The ultimate question here is whether Advance thought it had a serious legal liability due to the Pledge,” Ryan Chittum, an editor with the Columbia Journalism Review, wrote in June 2013 about the pact’s revocation. “Can you promise employees that ‘no full-time, non-represented, regular employee will ever be laid off because of economic conditions or because of the introduction of new technology’ and then unilaterally say ‘Oopsie! We don’t mean that anymore’? I don’t think so.”

 

Rebecca Theim was a reporter at The Times-Picayune from 1988-94. Her book,Hell and High Water: The Battle to Save the Daily New Orleans Times-Picayune, was published in October by Gretna’s Pelican Publishing Co. Follow Rebecca Theim on Twitter @RebeccaTheim. 




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock