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THE

Defender Picks

 

MERCREDI

June 28th

Noontime Talk

NOMA, 12PM

Jim Steg: New Work, with Curator Russell Lord

 

Books Beer & Bookworm Babble

Urban South Brewery, 5PM

A fundraiser for Friends of New Orleans

 

Local Intro to Oils

Monkey Monkey, 6PM

Get the 411 on essential oils

 

Rye Tasting

Grande Krewe, 6PM

A flight of rye

 

Stick To Your Guns

Republic, 6PM

With support by Hawthorne Heights

 

Free Yogalates

The Mint, 6:30PM

Part of Wine Down Wednesdays

 

WNOE Summer Jam

House of Blues, 7PM

Jerrod Neimann with Michael Ray and more

 

Comedy Gold

House of Blues, 7PM

Stand up comedy from the Big Easy

 

Corks & Colors

NOLA Yoga Loft, 7:30PM

Let the paints and wine flow

 

Weird Wednesday’s

Bar Redux, 9PM

The Extra Terrestrial Edition

 

Mighty Brother

Saturn Bar, 10PM

With Grace Pettis

JEUDI

June 29th

Essence Festival

Superdome, 10AM

All your favorites in one place

 

Talkin’ Jazz

Jazz Museum, 2PM

With Tom Saunders

 

Ogden After Hours

The Ogden, 6PM

Featuring Andrew Duhon

 

Movie Screening

Carver Theater, 6PM

FunkJazz Kafé: Diary Of A Decade 

 

Bleed On

Glitter Box, 6PM

Fundraising for We Are #HappyPeriod, powered by Refinery29

 

Book Signing

TREO, 7PM

SHOT by Kathy Shorr

 

BYO #Scored

Music Box Village, 7:30PM

Presenting “Where I’m From”

 

JD Hill & The Jammers

Bar Redux, 8PM

Get ready to jam

 

Night Church

Sidney's Saloon, 8:30PM

Headliner Johnny Azari, plus free ice cream

 

Henry & The Invisibles

Hi Ho, 9PM

With support by Noisewater

 

Soundbytes Fest Edition

Three Keys, 9PM

With PJ Morton + Friends

 

Trance Farmers

Dragon’s Den, 10PM

Support by Yung vul

 

Push Push

Banks St Bar, 10PM

With Rathbone + Raspy

 

VENDREDI

June 30th

Morton Records Day Party

411 S. Rampart St., 1PM

Celebrate with PJ Morton, featuring BBQ and live music from Denisia, 3D Na'Tee, and DJ G-Cue

 

Electric Girls Demo Day

Monroe Hall at Loyola, 1:30PM

Check out the newest inventions

 

Field to Table Time

NOPL Youth Services, 2PM

Learn how growing + cooking = saving the world

 

Dinner & A ZOOvie

Audubon Park, 6PM

A showing of Trolls

 

Movie Night in The Garden

Hollygrove Market, 7PM

A showing of Sister Act

 

Songwriter Night

Mags, 9PM

Ft. Shannon Jae, Una Walkenhorst, Rory Sullivan

 

Alligator ChompChomp

The Circle Bar, 9:30PM

Ft. DJ Pasta and Matty N Mitch

 

Free Music Friday

Fulton Ally, 10PM

Featuring DJ Chris Jones

 

Spektrum

Techno Club, 10PM

Ft. CHKLTE + residents

 

The Longitude Event

Café Istanbul, 10PM

Presented by Urban Push Movement

 

Foundation Free Fridays

Tips, 10PM

Ft. Maggie Koerner & Travers Geoffray + Cha Wa

 

Gimme A Reason

Poor Boys Bar, 11PM

Ft. Tristan Dufrene + Bouffant Bouffant

 

SAMEDI

July 1st

SLOSHBALL

The Fly, 12PM

Hosted by Prytania Bar

 

Organic Bug Management

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Learn about pests + organic management

 

Mystic Market

Rare Form NOLA, 2PM

Author talk, live music, art and more

 

Girls Rock New Orleans

Primary-Colton, 2:30PM

The official camper showcase

 

Serious Thing A Go Happen

Ace Hotel, 4PM

Exhibit viewing, artist talk, and after-sounds

 

Art NO(w)

Claire Elizabeth Gallery, 5PM

An eye popping opening reception

 

Antoine Diel Trio

Three Muses, 6PM

With Josh Paxton + Scott Johnson

 

CAIN Ressurection

Southport Music Hall, 9PM

Support by Overtone plus Akadia

 

Grits & Biscuits

House of Blues, 10PM

A Dirty South set

 

Jason Neville Band

BMC, 11PM

With Friends for Essence Fest

DIMANCHE

July 2nd

The Greatest Show On Earth

Prytania Theater, 10AM

Dramatic lives within a circus

 

THINK DEEP

The Drifter Hotel, 2PM

Ft. RYE, Lleauna, Tristen Dufrane

 

Night Market

Secondline Arts, 6PM

With Erica Lee

 

The Story of Stories

Académie Gnostique, 7PM

Learn about the practical magic of fairy tales

 

Silencio

One Eyed Jacks, 8PM

A tribute to David Lynch

 

Alex Bosworth

Bar Redux, 9PM

With Diako Diakoff

 

Church*

The Dragons’s Den, 10PM

SHANOOK, RUS, KIDD LOVE, ZANDER

 

International Flag Party

Howlin Wolf, 11:30PM

The hottest dance party of the year

 

New Creations Brass Band

Maple Leaf, 12AM

A special closing performance

 

LA Ladies & Women's Equality Day


On the 93rd anniversary of women's suffrage, Louisiana ladies are still facing injustices in the home, the workplace, and in D.C. In honor of Women's Equality Day, officially known as Women's Suffrage Day, NoDef talks to experts about the issues facing New Orleans' women. 

 

When asked what issues the Declaration of Sentiments (Seneca Falls, 1848) raised are still of concern today, Newcomb College Institute Center for Women’s Education and Research Executive Director, Sally Kenney, said, “Gosh, everything almost except the vote, which was the one non-unanimous resolution. Women can own property in marriage, and obtain divorce, but so many issues remain: violence against women being one of them.  Women still hold few positions of political power.  They vote at a higher rate than men, and live longer, and there are more of them.  They have greater rights to education, but are still devalued.”

 

Kenney added that of particular interest is the fact that the Louisiana State legislature is actually decreasing in the number of women and has the lowest number of women in state legislature of any other state.  According to the Center for Women in Politics, out of 144 seats in the state legislature, only 17 are held by women.  This means that when it comes to policies, laws and budget cuts concerning women’s issues in our state legislature, it’s 17 against 127.

 

Due to budget cuts, domestic violence programs lost $2.4 million of the $6.2 million the state was spending on services and emergency shelters across the state lost more than 38 percent of their funding from DCFS within six months. 

 

Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV), Executive Director Beth Meeks cautioned the state legislature during the last round of cuts, saying the situation was unstable and further cuts would greatly weaken an already underfunded system.

 

Meeks said, “In the last round of cuts, programs laid off about 10 percent of their staff and many used up any rainy day reserves they had set aside.  At this level of cuts, programs will be forced to reduce and eliminate services in some areas, if they can survive at all.”

 

Louisiana has led the nation in domestic homicides since 1997.  According to the September 2012 Violence Policy Center report, "When Men Murder Women," Louisiana ranked 4th in the nation in the rate of women killed by men in 2010. 

 

Meeks further adds that “In the long run the research proves it won’t save money, only increase costs to local communities who don’t have the funds.  It’s dangerous and it’s fiscally irresponsible, the absolute worst of both worlds.”

 

This case is just one example of the harm that the lack of political power can do.  The more women involved in the decision making means more attention paid, not just to women’s issues, but to all issues concerning the family. As Julie Schwam-Harris, IWO member and co-chair of the Legislative Agenda for Women (LAW), states, “Women’s welfare affects the entire health of the family.  That’s why our issues are so important.”

 

Rosalind Blanco Cook, Vice President of Independent Women’s Organization (IWO) and political science professor states in a Women’s Equality Day press release, “We have a long way to go politically.  Though women make up over 50 percent of the population of the United States, the number of women elected to serve in all levels of government is still small.  Only 20 percent of the United States Senators and only 18 percent of the House members are women.  At the state legislative level, 24 percent of those elected are women across the country.  Louisiana is lower than the national average once again.  In Congress, Louisiana has a rate of 12 percent female representation with Senator Mary Landrieu as the only woman in our Washington Delegation.”

 

In Louisiana women make 69 cents for every dollar a man makes, lower than the national average of 77 cents to the dollar. These figures are taken from a study conducted by the American Association of University Women. “The ability to earn equal pay gives one the financial ability to take the time to be involved civically and since the burden of family is greater on women than on their male counterparts, it greatly affects the ability for women to be involved civically, both as a candidate and electoral volunteer.”

 

Schawm-Harris further adds, “Women bring different perspectives to all avenues of government responsibility, and so do all minorities.  It is very important that we get those perspectives so that the decisions that are made help all.”

 

In this vein, Schawm-Harris advises women voters to keep trying to increase their engagement outside and inside the home and to support candidates, laws and policies that affect their lives.  “Inspire and support, no matter how small.  Emails and phone calls do make a difference.”

 

She urges women voters to keep in mind as we turn the corner on yet another coming election to stay in tune to who is going to support the kinds of government programs and regulations that will affect them and their families and try to proactively get those people elected.  “Don’t just look at the federal level.  Who is elected to Congress greatly effects who is elected at the state level as well.”

 

 

 




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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily