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THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

March 28th

Book Reading: Elizabeth Pearce

Garden District Book Shop, 6PM

From her new book "Drink Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Best Cocktail Bars, Dives, & Speakeasies"

 

Spring Publishing Camp

Tubby & Coo's Mid-City Book Shop, 7PM

Book publishing workshop

 

Gabby Douglas

Dillrd University, 7PM

Olympic gymnast talks fame and fitness

 

Laelume

The Carver, 7PM

World soul jazz music

 

Laughter Without Borders

Loyola University, 7PM

Clowns for a cause, to benefit Syrian refugees

 

Tuesday Night Haircuts

St. Roch Tavern, 8PM

Tonight: beer, haircuts, karaoke

 

Thinkin' With Lincoln 

Bayou Beer Garden, 8PM

Outdoor trivia

 

Water Seed

Blue Nile, 9PM

Interstellar future funk

 

Stanton Moore Trio

Snug Harbor, 10PM

Galactic drummer’s side project - also at 8PM

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


LA Ladies & Women's Equality Day


On the 93rd anniversary of women's suffrage, Louisiana ladies are still facing injustices in the home, the workplace, and in D.C. In honor of Women's Equality Day, officially known as Women's Suffrage Day, NoDef talks to experts about the issues facing New Orleans' women. 

 

When asked what issues the Declaration of Sentiments (Seneca Falls, 1848) raised are still of concern today, Newcomb College Institute Center for Women’s Education and Research Executive Director, Sally Kenney, said, “Gosh, everything almost except the vote, which was the one non-unanimous resolution. Women can own property in marriage, and obtain divorce, but so many issues remain: violence against women being one of them.  Women still hold few positions of political power.  They vote at a higher rate than men, and live longer, and there are more of them.  They have greater rights to education, but are still devalued.”

 

Kenney added that of particular interest is the fact that the Louisiana State legislature is actually decreasing in the number of women and has the lowest number of women in state legislature of any other state.  According to the Center for Women in Politics, out of 144 seats in the state legislature, only 17 are held by women.  This means that when it comes to policies, laws and budget cuts concerning women’s issues in our state legislature, it’s 17 against 127.

 

Due to budget cuts, domestic violence programs lost $2.4 million of the $6.2 million the state was spending on services and emergency shelters across the state lost more than 38 percent of their funding from DCFS within six months. 

 

Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV), Executive Director Beth Meeks cautioned the state legislature during the last round of cuts, saying the situation was unstable and further cuts would greatly weaken an already underfunded system.

 

Meeks said, “In the last round of cuts, programs laid off about 10 percent of their staff and many used up any rainy day reserves they had set aside.  At this level of cuts, programs will be forced to reduce and eliminate services in some areas, if they can survive at all.”

 

Louisiana has led the nation in domestic homicides since 1997.  According to the September 2012 Violence Policy Center report, "When Men Murder Women," Louisiana ranked 4th in the nation in the rate of women killed by men in 2010. 

 

Meeks further adds that “In the long run the research proves it won’t save money, only increase costs to local communities who don’t have the funds.  It’s dangerous and it’s fiscally irresponsible, the absolute worst of both worlds.”

 

This case is just one example of the harm that the lack of political power can do.  The more women involved in the decision making means more attention paid, not just to women’s issues, but to all issues concerning the family. As Julie Schwam-Harris, IWO member and co-chair of the Legislative Agenda for Women (LAW), states, “Women’s welfare affects the entire health of the family.  That’s why our issues are so important.”

 

Rosalind Blanco Cook, Vice President of Independent Women’s Organization (IWO) and political science professor states in a Women’s Equality Day press release, “We have a long way to go politically.  Though women make up over 50 percent of the population of the United States, the number of women elected to serve in all levels of government is still small.  Only 20 percent of the United States Senators and only 18 percent of the House members are women.  At the state legislative level, 24 percent of those elected are women across the country.  Louisiana is lower than the national average once again.  In Congress, Louisiana has a rate of 12 percent female representation with Senator Mary Landrieu as the only woman in our Washington Delegation.”

 

In Louisiana women make 69 cents for every dollar a man makes, lower than the national average of 77 cents to the dollar. These figures are taken from a study conducted by the American Association of University Women. “The ability to earn equal pay gives one the financial ability to take the time to be involved civically and since the burden of family is greater on women than on their male counterparts, it greatly affects the ability for women to be involved civically, both as a candidate and electoral volunteer.”

 

Schawm-Harris further adds, “Women bring different perspectives to all avenues of government responsibility, and so do all minorities.  It is very important that we get those perspectives so that the decisions that are made help all.”

 

In this vein, Schawm-Harris advises women voters to keep trying to increase their engagement outside and inside the home and to support candidates, laws and policies that affect their lives.  “Inspire and support, no matter how small.  Emails and phone calls do make a difference.”

 

She urges women voters to keep in mind as we turn the corner on yet another coming election to stay in tune to who is going to support the kinds of government programs and regulations that will affect them and their families and try to proactively get those people elected.  “Don’t just look at the federal level.  Who is elected to Congress greatly effects who is elected at the state level as well.”

 

 

 




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Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

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Michael Weber, B.A.

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Alexis Manrodt

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B. E. Mintz

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Stephen Babcock