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THE

Defender Picks

 

VENDREDI

May 26th

Bayou Country Superfest

Mercedes Benz Superdome, 11AM

Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton, Rascal Flatts and many more

 

Magazine St. Art Market

Dat Dog, 4PM

Happy hour + local art

 

Royal Street Stroll

200-900 Blocks of Royal St, 530PM

Led by the Krewe of Cork

 

YP Family Game Night

Urban League of Greater New Orleans, 6PM

Game night for young professionals and their families

 

Toonces and Friends

Marigny Opera House, 7PM

An orchestral journey through time

 

Spektrum Fridays

Techno Club, 10PM

Featuring J.DUB’L and residents Erica and Rye

 

New Thousand + Adrian

Balcony Music Club, 11PM

Violin centered hip hop

 

Free Music Series

Fulton Ally, 10PM

Featuring Bubl Trubl

SAMEDI

May 27th

Palmer Park, 10AM
The May edition of the monthly art market
 
New Orleans Jazz Market, 3PM
Light bites, drinks, DJs
 
Bar Redux, 7PM
Horror, fantasy, and spiritual movies from 13 countries
 
Bacchanel Fine Wine and Spirits, 7:30PM
Progressive jazz from one of the cities best
 
The Howlin Wolf, 8PM
Improvisational funk music
 
Joan Mitchell Center, 8PM
Monthly open mic
 
The Orpheum Theater, 9PM
Tremaine The Tour with support by Mike Angel
 
Santos Bar, 10PM
Mind expanding multi genre music

DIMANCHE

May 28th

NOLA MIX Records, 11AM
Teaching kids to DJ and produce beats
 
The Courtyard Brewery, 3PM
Raffle, silent auction, craft beer
 
Mags on Elysian Fields, 7PM
A new series dedicated to pushing the limits of contemporary music
 
Three Keys, 7PM
OC cabaret goes Sci-Fi
 
UNO Lakefront Arena, 8PM
Celebrating the 20th anniversary of her debut album
 
One Eyed Jacks, 10PM
Remixes, edits and originals of Fleetwood Mac
 
Rare Form, 10PM
Vintage sounds of American Root Music

Iles of Light

Bill Iles' Transcendental Forests



Painter Bill Iles reigns in Southern terrain to controlled, comprehensive and complex works. His oil paintings depict forest scenes of Southwestern Louisiana, inspired by the land around Lake Charles and Dry Creek, the small town where he was born.

 

Those who have ventured out of New Orleans and had the chance to see Southern fall landscapes will appreciate his body of work showing in March at the Cole Pratt Gallery (3800 Magazine St.)

Bill Iles shows his most recent forested landscapes.
Where: Cole Pratt Gallery, Magazine St.
WhenMarch 2, 2013 - March 31, 2013
Opening: March 2, 5:30 p.m.
 

 

Featured in the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities publication A Unique Slant of Light: the Bicentennial History of Art in Louisiana, Iles is a prolific artist with a secure spot in our country’s perspective of the natural world. However, he does not leave the viewer with any lofty impressions. Kind and open, he has a generous personality and thoughtful perspective on his life work. 

 

“Our ability to see is such a precious gift,” he says. And it’s easy to see how much he has devoted his life to this gift. On the day he delivered his paintings to the gallery, we talked about light and vision.  It’s clear that his eyes are as important a tool to him as his brush. His paintings deal a lot with perception and putting down human vision into concrete images.

 

We talked about how when the daylight is fading, and there’s barely any light left in the sky. It’s really our imagination that gives color to the outline of grass and trees, he said.

 

“We think we see more color than we actually do,” he said.

 

The muted blues and greens of the bark of the trees in Late Autumn are a good example of this phenomenon, and in Dusk falls on the Winter Woods he pushes the palette almost to the point of being monochromatic.

 

Repetitive and meditative, his color palette and composition express a certain serenity that doesn’t actually exist in reality. Given the complexity and often unideal nature of life, his work aims to harmonize the chaos of the woods. His emotional attachment to these scenes stems from his childhood in the woods of Lousiana, where his father would take him hunting. 

 

Unwilling to shoot the animals, he would “hide out” in a corner of the woods, observing. These formative years were the beginning of a life-long exploration of wilderness. In a press release issued by the Cole Pratt Gallery, Iles quotes Emerson’s essay On Nature:  “In the tranquil landscape, and especially in the distant line of the horizon, man beholds somewhat as beautiful as his own nature.”

 

Iles is heavily influenced by transcendental thought, and like other artists before him like Poussin or William Morris, he seeks to make sense of reality by creating a harmonious and balanced image.

 

The “line of the horizon” that Emerson wrote about is a significant reference for Iles to choose. Unlike many other landscape artists, who begin their work by painting the background sky or water, Iles intuitively starts his paintings with the foreground image, like the way our eye works. In a few of his paintings, like "Embankment Viewed from the Creek," we have to concentrate and struggle to make out the brush and trees before we arrive in the distance. 

 

In a 2010 article for myneworleans.com, John R. Kemp writes of Iles: “Muted beech trees in the foreground of his paintings act almost as barriers that viewers must breach before emerging into the distant sunlight and bright colors.”

 

Looking at his work definitely requires a certain amount of time and focus because his vegetation sometimes borders on abstraction. The reward of doing this is stepping back and making sense of the assembly of colors and textures, and realizing that there are some bigger pictures in the horizon of Iles’ paintings. 

 

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily