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THE

Defender Picks

 

Dimanche

April 20th

Gay Easter Parade

Armstrong Park (4:30 p.m.)

Official Gay Easter parade rolls through the French Quarter

 

Goodchildren Easter Parade

Press & St. Claude (1:30 p.m.)

The Social Aide & Pleasure Club throws their annual parade through the Bywater

 

Todd Snider 

Tipitina’s (7:30 p.m.)

Folk-rock and Americana 

 

Joe Krown Trio

Maple Leaf (10:30 p.m.)

Krown, Batiste, and Washington every Sunday 

 

French Quarter Easter Parade

Canal & Bourbon St. (1 p.m.)

Chris Owens leads the charge            

 

Hot 8 Brass Band

Howlin’ Wolf- The Den (10 p.m.)

Premiere NOLA brass with hip-hop, R&B and more 

Lundi

April 21st

Dyngus Day

Siberia (6 p.m.)

Debauche performs along with the G-String Orchestra

 

Traditional Irish Music

The Irish House (7p.m.)

Murphy's bangers are the most authentic in town, & the Gaelic jam is straigh outta Offaly

 

The Grand Budapest Hotel

The Prytania Theatre

(12, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10)

Wes Anderson's latest features a star studded cast as his signature eccenctrics, this time set in a luxury lodge.

 

Pyeka Balkan Trio

The Marigny Opera House (7p.m.)

A night of "musical meditation" scored by an all female vocal trio.

 

 

Magnetic Mondays with Magnetic Ear

Gasa Gasa (10 p.m.)

Free weekly show from Martin Krusche’s jazz group

 

King James & the Special Men

BJ's Lounge (10p.m.)

Weekly Mon Gig- Burgundy in the Bywater for that downtown rhythm and blues.

 

Glen David Andrews

d.b.a. (10p.m.)

Treme trombone man brings it on a Monday


 

Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes

Maple Leaf Bar (10p.m.)

NOLA funk-gypsy-rockers in Carrollton

 

Charmaine Neville Band

Snug Harbor (8p.m., 10p.m.)

Weekly Mon Gig- The Neville niece brings her soul and her band to Frenchmen

Mardi

April 22nd

Octavia Books (6p.m.)

Reading: Pirates You Don't Know and Other Adventures in the Examined Life

 

Monty Banks as Frank Sinatra

Mahogany Jazz Hall (at the Harem)

Old Blue Eyes Impersonator at a Gentlemen's Club

 

Dayna Kurtz w/Rob Mache

Cafe Istanbull (8p.m.)

Sultry songstress belts out rare gems of the past and originals 

 

Albinas Prizgintas 

Trinity Episcopal Church (6p.m.)

Classical organist creates “nights full of mystery”

 

 

Rebirth Brass Band

Maple Leaf Bar (10p.m.)

2 sets by the Grammy-winning brass band

 

Kermit Ruffins & The BBQ Swingers

Bullet’s Sports Bar (7p.m.)

Come see Kermit at home in the 7th Ward, and get to bed early

 

Most Wanted Brass Band

Hi-Ho Lounge (10 p.m.)

Ex-Stooges members retake the St. Claude spot

 

Crescent City Farmers Market

Broadway St Market (9a.m.-1p.m.)

Weekly Tues Gig- Uptown edition of the city's prime local market

 

Treme Brass Band

d.b.a (10p.m.)

The 6th Ward's home brass band saunters over to Frenchmen for some New Orleans music.


Iles of Light

Bill Iles' Transcendental Forests



Painter Bill Iles reigns in Southern terrain to controlled, comprehensive and complex works. His oil paintings depict forest scenes of Southwestern Louisiana, inspired by the land around Lake Charles and Dry Creek, the small town where he was born.

 

Those who have ventured out of New Orleans and had the chance to see Southern fall landscapes will appreciate his body of work showing in March at the Cole Pratt Gallery (3800 Magazine St.)

Bill Iles shows his most recent forested landscapes.
Where: Cole Pratt Gallery, Magazine St.
WhenMarch 2, 2013 - March 31, 2013
Opening: March 2, 5:30 p.m.
 

 

Featured in the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities publication A Unique Slant of Light: the Bicentennial History of Art in Louisiana, Iles is a prolific artist with a secure spot in our country’s perspective of the natural world. However, he does not leave the viewer with any lofty impressions. Kind and open, he has a generous personality and thoughtful perspective on his life work. 

 

“Our ability to see is such a precious gift,” he says. And it’s easy to see how much he has devoted his life to this gift. On the day he delivered his paintings to the gallery, we talked about light and vision.  It’s clear that his eyes are as important a tool to him as his brush. His paintings deal a lot with perception and putting down human vision into concrete images.

 

We talked about how when the daylight is fading, and there’s barely any light left in the sky. It’s really our imagination that gives color to the outline of grass and trees, he said.

 

“We think we see more color than we actually do,” he said.

 

The muted blues and greens of the bark of the trees in Late Autumn are a good example of this phenomenon, and in Dusk falls on the Winter Woods he pushes the palette almost to the point of being monochromatic.

 

Repetitive and meditative, his color palette and composition express a certain serenity that doesn’t actually exist in reality. Given the complexity and often unideal nature of life, his work aims to harmonize the chaos of the woods. His emotional attachment to these scenes stems from his childhood in the woods of Lousiana, where his father would take him hunting. 

 

Unwilling to shoot the animals, he would “hide out” in a corner of the woods, observing. These formative years were the beginning of a life-long exploration of wilderness. In a press release issued by the Cole Pratt Gallery, Iles quotes Emerson’s essay On Nature:  “In the tranquil landscape, and especially in the distant line of the horizon, man beholds somewhat as beautiful as his own nature.”

 

Iles is heavily influenced by transcendental thought, and like other artists before him like Poussin or William Morris, he seeks to make sense of reality by creating a harmonious and balanced image.

 

The “line of the horizon” that Emerson wrote about is a significant reference for Iles to choose. Unlike many other landscape artists, who begin their work by painting the background sky or water, Iles intuitively starts his paintings with the foreground image, like the way our eye works. In a few of his paintings, like "Embankment Viewed from the Creek," we have to concentrate and struggle to make out the brush and trees before we arrive in the distance. 

 

In a 2010 article for myneworleans.com, John R. Kemp writes of Iles: “Muted beech trees in the foreground of his paintings act almost as barriers that viewers must breach before emerging into the distant sunlight and bright colors.”

 

Looking at his work definitely requires a certain amount of time and focus because his vegetation sometimes borders on abstraction. The reward of doing this is stepping back and making sense of the assembly of colors and textures, and realizing that there are some bigger pictures in the horizon of Iles’ paintings. 

 

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Ian Hoch, Will Dilella, Chris Rinaldi, Lianna Patch, Phil Yiannopoulos, Cate Czarnecki, Mary Kilpatrick, Norris Ortolano, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Kailyn Davillier, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham

Staff Writers

Kerem Ozkan, Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings

Elisabeth Morgan

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Robert, Daniel Paschall

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Deputy Managing Editor

M.D. Dupuy

Managing Editor

Stephen Babcock

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.