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THE

Defender Picks

 

Jeudi

November 27th

Opening Day at the Track

Fair Grounds, 11a.m.

Celebrate turkey day with a $29.99 buffet at the Grandstand and 10 thoroughbred races

 

Bayou Classic Smoke-Free Thanksgiving Day Parade

Superdome, 3:30-6p.m.

Starting at the dome the parade marches all the way to the French Market sponsored by #SmokeFreeNOLA

 

Thanksgiving: Dine-In or Pre-Order Take-Out!

The Country Club, 11a.m.-7p.m.

Full course family-sized options made to order hot and fresh on turkey day

 

Micah McKee and the Little Maker

Blue Nile, 7p.m.

Folksy local singer-songwriter

 

Turkey Day Race

Tad Gormley Stadium, 8:30 p.m.

107th Annual five mile & half mile races benefitting Spina Bifida

 

Celebration in the Oaks

City Park, Open thru Jan 3

View the magical display of lights by foot or by train

 

Thanksgiving Throwdown 

Howlin’ Wolf, 10p.m.

Free Comedy Gumbeaux show (8:30p.m.) followed by Rebirth Brass Band and Glen David Andrews ($15)

 

Thanksgiving Zydeco with Geno Delafose & French Rockin Boogie

Rock ‘N’ Bowl, 8:30

Celebrate why you’re thankful for Louisiana roots with nouveau zydeco from da bayou

 

Reggae Night with DJ T-ROY

Blue Nile, 11p.m.

Roots reggae with local dreaded DJ

 

The Soul Rebels

Le Bon Temps Roule, 11p.m.

Brass heros take on their regular gig this Thanksgiving

 

DJ MUSA

Siberia, 10p.m.

Celebrate Black Thursday on St. Claude with local spinner

 

Vendredi

November 28th

The New Orleans Suspects feat. Paul Barrere of Little Feat

Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Also with special guests Ed Volker (The Radiators) and John “Papa” Gros

 

Tank and the Bangas “Stone Soul Picnic”

Chickie Wah Wah, 10p.m.

Rhythmic soul and spoken word from locally formed group led by singer Tarriona Ball

 

Grayson Capps

Carrollton Station, 10p.m.

Raw bayou blues done right + Lauren Murphy; $2 Rolling Rock

 

Luke Winslow King w/SamDoores (The Deslondes/Hurray for the Riff Raff)

d.b.a., 10p.m.

Fresh Americana from Nola rooted musicians $10

 

Kermit Ruffins & The BBQ Swingers

Blue Nile, 7p.m.

Friday nights with Kermit on Frenchmen ($10)

 

Brass-A-Holics vs. Mainline

Blue Nile, 11p.m.

Dueling brass

 

DJ Black Pearl

Blue Nile Balcony Room, 1a.m.

Two nights of EDM from the princess of Indian dj’s

 

Teairra Mari: All Black Affair

House of Blues, 11p.m.

Presented by Tscolee & Loft 360 Society she's sung w/ Gucci Mane & Soulja Boy

 

Lalah Hathaway, Najee, Anthony David

Saenger Theatre, 7:30p.m.

Grammy-winning singer brings soul to the Saenger

 

Bayou Classic Golf Tournament

Joe Bartholomew Golf Course (Pontchartrain Park), 10a.m.

Test your driving and putting skills in this bonafide local tournament

 

Career & College Fair

Hyatt Regency Hotel, 10a.m.-3p.m.

Part of Bayou Classic’s events helping companies and graduates connect

 

Battle of the Bands And Greek Show

Superdome, 6p.m.

A decades long rivalry features a battle of school marching bands in preparation for tomorrow’s big game

 

Marc Broussard

Southport Music Hall, 8p.m.

Son of Boogie King’s Ted Broussard this cajun’s voice is full of well-placed soul

 

Black Friday Fiasco

Banks St. Bar, 10p.m.-3a.m.

A tribute to the Ramones with sideshows by lydia Treats, Pope Matt Thomas and burlesque from Xena Zeit-Geist

 

 

Samedi

November 29th

Water Isaacson - The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers Geniuses, and Geeks Created a Digital Revolution 

Newman, 1-3p.m.

Hear author of Steve Jobs speak about pioneer of computer programming Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s daughter and other innovators of the digital age

 

Cedric Burnside Project ft Garry Burnside and Gravy

Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Catch this Blues Hall of Famer uptown

 

Little Freddie King

The Beatnik, 9p.m.

Join this class act local bluesman in Central City

 

FKA Twigs

Republic, 9p.m.

The sexiest electronic R&B show you’ll probably ever go to

 

Build Your Own Bloody Mary Bar

The Country Club, 10a.m.-3p.m.

Do it how you live it + $10 bottomless Mimosas every Sat and Sun

 

DJ Black Pearl

Blue Nile Balcony Room, 1a.m.

Two nights of EDM from the princess of Indian dj’s

 

Hustle w/ DJ Soul Sister

Hi Ho Lounge, 9p.m.-1a.m.

Get ya hustle on to humble resident DJ who spins it how she lives it

 

John Boutte

d.b.a., 8p.m.

Witness local jazz vocalist’s voice floating on Frenchmen ($10)

 

Funk Monkey

d.b.a., 10p.m.

Second-line funk and dank boogaloo groove made to make ya move ya feet

 

Eric Lindell

d.b.a., 11p.m.

San Franciscan native turned Cajun sifts through elements of blues and soul $15

 

Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue

Siberia, 10p.m.

Authentic N.O. honky-tonk rockgal

 

Down

Southport Hall, 7p.m.

Philip Anselmo's local metal cult 

 

Bayou Classic

Superdome, 1:30p.m.

Rivals Southern University and Grambling State duke it out for the 41st time in this annually played game

 

Fan Fest

Champions Square, 9a.m.-1p.m.

Music outside da dome featuring 5th Ward Weebie and more

 

Iles of Light

Bill Iles' Transcendental Forests



Painter Bill Iles reigns in Southern terrain to controlled, comprehensive and complex works. His oil paintings depict forest scenes of Southwestern Louisiana, inspired by the land around Lake Charles and Dry Creek, the small town where he was born.

 

Those who have ventured out of New Orleans and had the chance to see Southern fall landscapes will appreciate his body of work showing in March at the Cole Pratt Gallery (3800 Magazine St.)

Bill Iles shows his most recent forested landscapes.
Where: Cole Pratt Gallery, Magazine St.
WhenMarch 2, 2013 - March 31, 2013
Opening: March 2, 5:30 p.m.
 

 

Featured in the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities publication A Unique Slant of Light: the Bicentennial History of Art in Louisiana, Iles is a prolific artist with a secure spot in our country’s perspective of the natural world. However, he does not leave the viewer with any lofty impressions. Kind and open, he has a generous personality and thoughtful perspective on his life work. 

 

“Our ability to see is such a precious gift,” he says. And it’s easy to see how much he has devoted his life to this gift. On the day he delivered his paintings to the gallery, we talked about light and vision.  It’s clear that his eyes are as important a tool to him as his brush. His paintings deal a lot with perception and putting down human vision into concrete images.

 

We talked about how when the daylight is fading, and there’s barely any light left in the sky. It’s really our imagination that gives color to the outline of grass and trees, he said.

 

“We think we see more color than we actually do,” he said.

 

The muted blues and greens of the bark of the trees in Late Autumn are a good example of this phenomenon, and in Dusk falls on the Winter Woods he pushes the palette almost to the point of being monochromatic.

 

Repetitive and meditative, his color palette and composition express a certain serenity that doesn’t actually exist in reality. Given the complexity and often unideal nature of life, his work aims to harmonize the chaos of the woods. His emotional attachment to these scenes stems from his childhood in the woods of Lousiana, where his father would take him hunting. 

 

Unwilling to shoot the animals, he would “hide out” in a corner of the woods, observing. These formative years were the beginning of a life-long exploration of wilderness. In a press release issued by the Cole Pratt Gallery, Iles quotes Emerson’s essay On Nature:  “In the tranquil landscape, and especially in the distant line of the horizon, man beholds somewhat as beautiful as his own nature.”

 

Iles is heavily influenced by transcendental thought, and like other artists before him like Poussin or William Morris, he seeks to make sense of reality by creating a harmonious and balanced image.

 

The “line of the horizon” that Emerson wrote about is a significant reference for Iles to choose. Unlike many other landscape artists, who begin their work by painting the background sky or water, Iles intuitively starts his paintings with the foreground image, like the way our eye works. In a few of his paintings, like "Embankment Viewed from the Creek," we have to concentrate and struggle to make out the brush and trees before we arrive in the distance. 

 

In a 2010 article for myneworleans.com, John R. Kemp writes of Iles: “Muted beech trees in the foreground of his paintings act almost as barriers that viewers must breach before emerging into the distant sunlight and bright colors.”

 

Looking at his work definitely requires a certain amount of time and focus because his vegetation sometimes borders on abstraction. The reward of doing this is stepping back and making sense of the assembly of colors and textures, and realizing that there are some bigger pictures in the horizon of Iles’ paintings. 

 

Erin Rose
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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock