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Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

Vendredi

November 28th

The New Orleans Suspects feat. Paul Barrere of Little Feat

Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Also with special guests Ed Volker (The Radiators) and John “Papa” Gros

 

Tank and the Bangas “Stone Soul Picnic”

Chickie Wah Wah, 10p.m.

Rhythmic soul and spoken word from locally formed group led by singer Tarriona Ball

 

Grayson Capps

Carrollton Station, 10p.m.

Raw bayou blues done right + Lauren Murphy; $2 Rolling Rock

 

Luke Winslow King w/SamDoores (The Deslondes/Hurray for the Riff Raff)

d.b.a., 10p.m.

Fresh Americana from Nola rooted musicians $10

 

Kermit Ruffins & The BBQ Swingers

Blue Nile, 7p.m.

Friday nights with Kermit on Frenchmen ($10)

 

Brass-A-Holics vs. Mainline

Blue Nile, 11p.m.

Dueling brass

 

DJ Black Pearl

Blue Nile Balcony Room, 1a.m.

Two nights of EDM from the princess of Indian dj’s

 

Teairra Mari: All Black Affair

House of Blues, 11p.m.

Presented by Tscolee & Loft 360 Society she's sung w/ Gucci Mane & Soulja Boy

 

Lalah Hathaway, Najee, Anthony David

Saenger Theatre, 7:30p.m.

Grammy-winning singer brings soul to the Saenger

 

Bayou Classic Golf Tournament

Joe Bartholomew Golf Course (Pontchartrain Park), 10a.m.

Test your driving and putting skills in this bonafide local tournament

 

Career & College Fair

Hyatt Regency Hotel, 10a.m.-3p.m.

Part of Bayou Classic’s events helping companies and graduates connect

 

Battle of the Bands And Greek Show

Superdome, 6p.m.

A decades long rivalry features a battle of school marching bands in preparation for tomorrow’s big game

 

Marc Broussard

Southport Music Hall, 8p.m.

Son of Boogie King’s Ted Broussard this cajun’s voice is full of well-placed soul

 

Black Friday Fiasco

Banks St. Bar, 10p.m.-3a.m.

A tribute to the Ramones with sideshows by lydia Treats, Pope Matt Thomas and burlesque from Xena Zeit-Geist

 

 

Samedi

November 29th

Water Isaacson - The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers Geniuses, and Geeks Created a Digital Revolution 

Newman, 1-3p.m.

Hear author of Steve Jobs speak about pioneer of computer programming Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s daughter and other innovators of the digital age

 

Cedric Burnside Project ft Garry Burnside and Gravy

Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Catch this Blues Hall of Famer uptown

 

Little Freddie King

The Beatnik, 9p.m.

Join this class act local bluesman in Central City

 

FKA Twigs

Republic, 9p.m.

The sexiest electronic R&B show you’ll probably ever go to

 

Build Your Own Bloody Mary Bar

The Country Club, 10a.m.-3p.m.

Do it how you live it + $10 bottomless Mimosas every Sat and Sun

 

DJ Black Pearl

Blue Nile Balcony Room, 1a.m.

Two nights of EDM from the princess of Indian dj’s

 

Hustle w/ DJ Soul Sister

Hi Ho Lounge, 9p.m.-1a.m.

Get ya hustle on to humble resident DJ who spins it how she lives it

 

John Boutte

d.b.a., 8p.m.

Witness local jazz vocalist’s voice floating on Frenchmen ($10)

 

Funk Monkey

d.b.a., 10p.m.

Second-line funk and dank boogaloo groove made to make ya move ya feet

 

Eric Lindell

d.b.a., 11p.m.

San Franciscan native turned Cajun sifts through elements of blues and soul $15

 

Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue

Siberia, 10p.m.

Authentic N.O. honky-tonk rockgal

 

Down

Southport Hall, 7p.m.

Philip Anselmo's local metal cult 

 

Bayou Classic

Superdome, 1:30p.m.

Rivals Southern University and Grambling State duke it out for the 41st time in this annually played game

 

Fan Fest

Champions Square, 9a.m.-1p.m.

Music outside da dome featuring 5th Ward Weebie and more

 

Greeking Out

Greek Fest’s Makes 40 with Hellenic Dancing, Fare, and Ouzo on the Bayou



For their 40th year, The Holy Trinity Cathedral (1200 Robert E. Lee Blvd) is inviting Grecophiles out to Bayou St. John for goat burgers, traditional music and dancing, regional libations, and fun for all ages. 

 

In 1973, Greek Fest began as a casual gathering for parishioners whose church had grown too big for its britches. It wasn’t long before the fest’s ideal location on Bayou St. John, distinctive food offerings, and blissful atmosphere began to attract a wide audience.

 

“The reason the festival started was because we outgrew out church, so we bought property on Bayou St. John. Our first festival was more like a fair, honestly,” said Festival Co Chair Gail Psilos.

 

Although non-Greeks have grown to embrace the festival as one of New Orleans’ major attractions, the annual event remains an authentic reflection of Hellenic heritage.   Like most ethnic strongholds in the Big Easy, Greek Orthodox folks have preserved key elements of their culture and blended them with New Orleans’ laidback attitude.

 

“We are the first Greek Orthodox Church in all of North and South America,” said Psilos. “We are a port city, and many ships from all different countries came here because of the Mississippi River. Our religion and our heritage go hand in hand.”

 

One of the best things about the Greeks is their diet, well documented for its flavors, as well as its health benefits. “The one thing you can always bank on is a Mediterranean diet,” said Psilos. “Homemade string beans and a tomato sauce, olive oil, and fresh vegetables will be on our dinner plate.”

 

In keeping with the casual feel of the fest, dinner plates are served in the church’s gymnasium. However, the food booths are the major culinary draw. Greek calamari with feta cheese, goat burgers, baklava, and frappes (Greek coffee) offer guests cuisine that ventures outside of the typical New Orleans palate.

 

Perhaps the best example of this Greco-NOLA fusion is the festival’s Ouzo jello shot. Of course, there is a Daiquiri booth, where they’ll be serving the Greek spirit. Ouzo is distilled from anise, which is what gives the liquor its licorice flavor.

 

Wine lovers can buy by the bottle or the glass, and the fest offers a variety of juices. Psilos said that, like Italian and Argentian wines, Greek varieties are “very nutty and fruity” and sometimes tart. “Greek wines are traditionally dry, we also have a sweet red wine. We’ve really culled a taste for what people like,” said the co-chair.

 

Once guests have sipped to their heart’s content, they can enjoy traditional Hellenic dancers, one of the biggest draws of the festival. The uproarious genre of music—and perhaps the ouzo--has been known to inspire novice dancers to let loose on the grounds.

 

Some will be using designated drivers, but the fest remains a family-friendly event. a children’s area will be sure to have French fries and hotdogs for young taste buds, as well as face painting. Parents can also take their kids on canoe rides, another benefit to hosting a festival on the water.

 

Local artist Michalopoulos created Greek Fest’s 40th anniversary poster, which has yet to be unveiled. Psilos said that, for a $5 entry fee, Greek Fest continues to give fest-goers “A lot of bang for [their] buck!”

 

Hours are Friday, May 24: 5pm-11pm,  Saturday, May 25: 11am-11pm, and Sunday, May 26: 11am-9pm. 

 

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock