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THE

Defender Picks

 

VENDREDI

August 29th

Mad Decent Block Party
Mardi Gras World, 2p.m.
Ft. A$AP Ferg, Big Gigantic, Dillon Francis & more ($45)

 

Friday Nights At NOMA
NOMA, 6-8p.m.

Art historians speak on Hale Woodruff’s murals, plus music by Arpa Quartet

 

Zephyrs vs. Memphis
Zephyr Stadium, 7p.m.

Local baseball in Metairie

 

The Producers
Southport Hall, 7:30p.m.

The 80s new wave band, live! ($20)

 

Nine Lives: A Musical Witness of New Orleans
Le Petit Theatre, 8p.m.
Starring Paul Sanchez, Bryan Batt, Michael Cerveris, and local musicians ($20-50)

 

Two Gentlemen of Lebowski - A Reading
Mid City Theatre, 8p.m.
A comedy reading that’s half Shakespeare, half Dude ($10)

 

Landlady
Hi-Ho Lounge, 9p.m.
Brooklyn band ft. Adam Schatz of Man Man ($10)

 

Underdogcentral HeadPhones Release Party
Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.

Ft. Lyriqs Da Lyraciss, Dappa, Kaye the Beast, No Suh, Kash Akbar

 

Amanda Shires
Freret Street Publiq House, 9p.m.

Texas singer and violinist (and wife of Jason Isbell)

 

Foundation Free Fridays
Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Ft. Gravity A’s tribute to the Talking Heads

 

TNM Presents: The Match Game
Shadowbox Theatre, 10:30p.m.

The New Movement resurrects the ‘70s game show for laughs ($8)

SAMEDI

August 30th

The Cincinnati Kid
Historic NO Collection, 10:30a.m.
Starring Steve McQueen, Ann-Margret, Edward G. Robinson (free)

 

George Porter Jr. and the Runnin' Pardners, Tab Benoit
Howlin’ Wolf, 4p.m.
Plus Bonerama, The Boogiemen, Dave Ferrato and Tchoupazin & more

 

Guitar Lightnin’ Lee & His Thunder Band
Kajun’s, 5p.m.
Stay late for karoke

 

Zephyrs vs. Memphis
Zephyr Stadium, 6p.m.
Local baseball in Metairie

 

Two Gentlemen of Lebowski - A Reading
Mid City Theatre, 8p.m.
A comedy reading that’s half Shakespeare, half Dude ($10)

 

Panty Waste, TV-MA, Beautiful Sons, Liquid Nailz
Siberia, 9p.m.

Decadence punk show benefits LGBTQ prisoner advocates Black & Pink New Orleans

 

Yelephants, Donovan Wolfington, Pope
One Eyed Jacks, 9p.m.
All-star local band lineup in the Quarter ($5)

 

Rebirth Brass Band
Tipitina’s, 10p.m.
Grammy-winning band is a can't-miss New Orleans standout ($15)

 

Caddywhompus, Vox and the Hound
Carrollton Station, 10p.m.
Local indie math rock champions

 

Part Time, Sea Lions
Circle Bar, 10p.m.
California synth-psych ($5)

 

Naked Karaoke—Decadence Edition
Allways Lounge, 10p.m.
Clothing optional, in case karaoke wasn’t bad enough
 

TNM Presents: The Megaphone Show
Shadowbox Theatre, 10:30p.m.
The New Movement’s flagship storytelling improv show ($8)

DIMANCHE

August 31st

Southern Decadence Parade
Royal Street, 2p.m.
Official song: Britney Spears’ “Work Bitch”

 

Musical Mediation: Travis Bird
Marigny Opera House, 5p.m.
Local singer-songwriter offers a partially improvised set (by donation)

 

Zephyrs vs. Memphis
Zephyr Stadium, 6p.m.
Local baseball in Metairie

 

Bounce TV Summer Music Festival
Lakefront Arena, 7p.m.
Starring Maze ft. Frankie Beverly & Patti Labelle ($60+)

 

Hi Ho Silver Oh, Dark Rooms
the BEATnik, 10p.m.
Precious pop from Los Angeles

 

Psychedelic Winter
One Eyed Jacks, 10p.m.
A tribute to Pink Floyd tribute ($10)

 

 

Polyphonic Spree, Sarah Jaffe
Southport Hall, 10p.m.
Choral rock band from Dallas (rescheduled date)


Greeking Out

Greek Fest’s Makes 40 with Hellenic Dancing, Fare, and Ouzo on the Bayou



For their 40th year, The Holy Trinity Cathedral (1200 Robert E. Lee Blvd) is inviting Grecophiles out to Bayou St. John for goat burgers, traditional music and dancing, regional libations, and fun for all ages. 

 

In 1973, Greek Fest began as a casual gathering for parishioners whose church had grown too big for its britches. It wasn’t long before the fest’s ideal location on Bayou St. John, distinctive food offerings, and blissful atmosphere began to attract a wide audience.

 

“The reason the festival started was because we outgrew out church, so we bought property on Bayou St. John. Our first festival was more like a fair, honestly,” said Festival Co Chair Gail Psilos.

 

Although non-Greeks have grown to embrace the festival as one of New Orleans’ major attractions, the annual event remains an authentic reflection of Hellenic heritage.   Like most ethnic strongholds in the Big Easy, Greek Orthodox folks have preserved key elements of their culture and blended them with New Orleans’ laidback attitude.

 

“We are the first Greek Orthodox Church in all of North and South America,” said Psilos. “We are a port city, and many ships from all different countries came here because of the Mississippi River. Our religion and our heritage go hand in hand.”

 

One of the best things about the Greeks is their diet, well documented for its flavors, as well as its health benefits. “The one thing you can always bank on is a Mediterranean diet,” said Psilos. “Homemade string beans and a tomato sauce, olive oil, and fresh vegetables will be on our dinner plate.”

 

In keeping with the casual feel of the fest, dinner plates are served in the church’s gymnasium. However, the food booths are the major culinary draw. Greek calamari with feta cheese, goat burgers, baklava, and frappes (Greek coffee) offer guests cuisine that ventures outside of the typical New Orleans palate.

 

Perhaps the best example of this Greco-NOLA fusion is the festival’s Ouzo jello shot. Of course, there is a Daiquiri booth, where they’ll be serving the Greek spirit. Ouzo is distilled from anise, which is what gives the liquor its licorice flavor.

 

Wine lovers can buy by the bottle or the glass, and the fest offers a variety of juices. Psilos said that, like Italian and Argentian wines, Greek varieties are “very nutty and fruity” and sometimes tart. “Greek wines are traditionally dry, we also have a sweet red wine. We’ve really culled a taste for what people like,” said the co-chair.

 

Once guests have sipped to their heart’s content, they can enjoy traditional Hellenic dancers, one of the biggest draws of the festival. The uproarious genre of music—and perhaps the ouzo--has been known to inspire novice dancers to let loose on the grounds.

 

Some will be using designated drivers, but the fest remains a family-friendly event. a children’s area will be sure to have French fries and hotdogs for young taste buds, as well as face painting. Parents can also take their kids on canoe rides, another benefit to hosting a festival on the water.

 

Local artist Michalopoulos created Greek Fest’s 40th anniversary poster, which has yet to be unveiled. Psilos said that, for a $5 entry fee, Greek Fest continues to give fest-goers “A lot of bang for [their] buck!”

 

Hours are Friday, May 24: 5pm-11pm,  Saturday, May 25: 11am-11pm, and Sunday, May 26: 11am-9pm. 

 

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings Editor

Anna Gaca

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock