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French Quarter Joan of Arc Statue Defaced



Updated Thursday (5.4), 11:15AM

 

On Wednesday night (5.3), a new development was made in the city’s ongoing issue with the monuments when French Quarter residents and workers discovered that the beloved Joan of Arc statue was vandalized by unknown perpetrators. 

 

The preservation of the city’s monuments has been an ongoing issue in New Orleans, with residents taking divisive stances regarding whether a group of Confederate statues should remain installed around the city or moved to museum facilities. 

 

The vandalization was a shocking new chapter in the contentious narrative — up until now, most of the strife was centered around the community trying to stop the City of New Orleans from the massive take down project.

 

This symbolic offense touches on another part of New Orleans's vast history: the connection to France. The golden bronze statue is installed in the heart of the Quarter at the Place de Frace near the French Market, gifted by France to the citizens of New Orleans in 1972. 

 

The Joan of Arc statue also offers one of the few female representations in statue form, occupying a part in the small faction of monuments dedicated to underrepresented and minority peoples. 

 

“It’s a great disappointment as Joan of Arc has nothing to do with New Orleans or American history,” Amy Kirk, President and Founder of The Joan of Arc Project which organizes the annual Krewe de Jeanne d'Arc parade, told NoDef. "She is beyond the current issues of New Orleans [with the monuments]. She unified and did not divide. She was a girl who fought for her country, and fought for her own personhood. There is a universal truth about Joan of Arc’s idealism and strength — one that has nothing to do with politics.” 

 

New Orleans resident Mark Couvillon shared an image of the vandalism with NoDef. 

 

 

As of 10AM, the graffiti had been washed away by the city, though faint traces of the paint are still clearly visible. 

 

Stay with NoDef for updates. 

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Alexis Manrodt, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor


Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

Alexis Manrodt


B. E. Mintz


Stephen Babcock

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