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THE

Defender Picks

 

LUNDI

February 20th

Glen David Andrews

d.b.a., 10PM

Treme trombone man brings it on a Monday ($5)

 

Detox to Retox

Big Easy 'Bucha, 6:30PM

Free yoga and kombucha for a mid-Carnival cleanse

 

Jazz Manouche Mondays

The Dragon's Den, 7PM

Cover all your bases with a gypsy jazz jam session, dance lesson, and dinner potluck 

 

Blue Velvet & Kuwaisiana & Green Gasoline

The Allways Lounge and Theatre, 7PM

A triple threat lineup of independent rockers

 

Alexis & The Samurai

d.b.a., 7PM

Indie folk duo perform every Monday

 

Aurora Nealand & The Royal Roses

Maison, 7PM

Nealand and her band have a fresh take on traditional jazz

 

Alex McMurray

Chickie Wah Wah, 8pm

A New Orleans classic, belting out fox-trot slot-machine music

 

Bluegrass Pickin' Party

Hi-Ho Lounge, 8PM

Bring an instrument and join in 

 

Comic Strip 

Siberia, 9PM

Burlesque and standup ($5)

 

Poetry on Poets

Cafe Istanbul, 9PM

Weekly poetry open mic with live music ($5)

 

Brass-A-Holics

Blue Nile, 10PM

NOLA brass with a touch of DC go-go

 

 

MARDI

February 21st

Stanton Moore Trio

Snug Harbor, 8PM & 10PM

Galactic drummer's side project

 

Film Screening

Burgundy Picture House, 8PM

John Cassavetes' 1970 film Husbands

 

Comedy Beast

Howlin' Wolf Den, 8:30PM

Free comedy show

 

Water Seed

Blue Nile, 9PM

Intergalatic future funk at this high-energy show

 

Treme Brass Band

d.b.a., 10PM

Benny Jones and friends keep classic NOLA music thriving

 

Smoking Time Jazz Club

Spotted Cat, 10PM

Trad jazz masters play their weekly gig

 

Rebirth Brass Band

Maple Leaf, 11PM

2 sets by the Grammy-winning brass band

 

Crescent City Farmers Market

Broadway Street, 9AM-1PM

Uptown edition of the city's prime local market


Football to Return Uptown: Tulane to Build On-Campus Stadium


by Brad Rhines

If you’ve ever had front row seats at the Superdome, you were probably at a Tulane game.  While the Saints have had sold out seasons in the Dome since 2006, Tulane games still struggle to draw crowds, but that could change with today’s announcement that a new Tulane Stadium will be built on campus in time for the 2014 football season.

 

While Tulane’s reputation is built more on academics than athletics, that’s only part of the reason for such sparse attendance at Green Wave home games.  Freshmen and sophomores at Tulane are required to live on campus and are prohibited from having cars, which means students who want to see the team play have to take the streetcar to Poydras then walk to the Dome.  It may not sound like much of a commute, but given the team’s lack of success in recent years and the gloomy atmosphere of a half-filled Dome, most students usually find another to spend a Saturday in New Orleans.

 

At a press conference today, university president Scott Cowen and Tulane athletic staff unveiled plans to build a 30,000-seat stadium on the site of the team’s current practice field.  The anticipated cost is $70 million, more than half of which has already been raised. 

 

 “it’s all about the home field advantage,” Cowen said.

 

According to a recent report from Fox 8 much of the funding has come from the Benson family and the Glazer family, which owns the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.  Why do the owners of the Saints NFC South rivals want a stadium at Tulane?  Avie Glazer, son of Bucs owner Malcolm Glazer, lives in New Orleans with his wife Jill Henkin Glazer, a Tulane alum who also serves on the university’s board.

 

The old Tulane Stadium was erected in 1926 and was an institution on campus before being demolished in 1980.  In addition to hosting TU home games, it was where the Sugar Bowl got its start, hosted three Super Bowls, and was the original home of the Saints, where John Gilliam returned an opening kickoff for 94 yards during the first game of the Saints’ inaugural season.

 

The news of the stadium follows the recent hire of Curtis Johnson, the Saints receivers coach, as head coach of the Green Wave football team.  It also caps off a busy six years, as Tulane worked to recover from the impact of Hurricane Katrina.  After closing for the fall semester of 2005, Tulane reopened and reorganized, making controversial decisions to close Newcomb College and the School of Engineering—a decision that outraged the late Ashley Morris and his HBO proxy Creighton Bernette, played by John Goodman.

 

According to Cowen, “we have now financially recovered from Katrina.”  Cowen expects the new stadium to energize not only the student body, but also the rest of the city, saying “it will be an economic driver for the city we all love.”

 

For more pictures and information, visit the Tulane University Community Stadium website.




It could be intentional. Try

It could be intentional. Try www.tulanestadium.com if you must.

The link at the bottom is to

The link at the bottom is to the ashley morris blog again...I think that's a mistake although it could be intentional

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