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THE

Defender Picks

 

Mercredi

April 16th

Honey Island Swamp Band

Lafayette Square (5 p.m.)

Plus Bill Iuso and the Restless Natives 

 

The Goodnight Show with Luke Winslow-King

Café Istanbul (8 p.m.)

Plus Bruce Davenport Jr., Jacinta Gonzales, and more  

 

Noah Gundersen feat. Armon Jay

Gasa Gasa (8 p.m.)

Folk singer/songwriter and guitarist from Seattle performs after neo-folk artist Armon Jay   

 

Shotgun Cinema

Marigny Opera House (7 p.m.)

Film series presents Lithuanian psychosexual thriller, Vanishing Waves

 

Big Fat & Delicious CD Release

Siberia (10 p.m.)

New album “Eureka,” other acts include The No Shows and Zach Quinn   

 

Cliff and Sasha 

Allways Lounge (10:30 p.m.)

Progressive music duo 

 

Think You're Funny?

Carrollton Station (9 p.m.)

Stand-up comedy open mic in Riverbend



 

Walter Wolfman Washington

d.b.a. (10 p.m.)

Fiery blues on Frenchmen - every week


 

Major Bacon

Banks Street Bar (10 p.m.)

Blues rock and BLTs!


 

Hump Day SIN

Country Club (All Day)

Half-off admission to pool area for service industry members from 10 a.m. - 1 a.m.



 

Mississippi Rail Co.

Maple Leaf Bar (10p.m.)

Blues on Oak St.


 

Tin Men

dba (7p.m.)

Weekly Wed Gig- The world's premiere washboard-sousaphone-guitar trio.


 

Treme Brass Band

Candlelight Lounge (9p.m.)

Weekly Wed Gig- Pass on by and see the 6th Ward’s home band.

 

Jeudi

April 17th

Jazz in the Park

Armstrong Park (3 p.m.)

This year’s free concert series kicks off with Fifth Ward Weebie, the Landry-Walker Marching Band, and Glen David Andrews  

 

Umphrey's McGee

Civic Theatre (7 p.m.)

with Lionize

 

Tuba Skinny

Ogden Museum (5:30 p.m.)

After Hours with food from Miss Linda’s Soul Food Catering, drinks, and more. Admission is $10  

 

Concerts in the Courtyard

Historic New Orleans Collection (6 p.m.)

French Quarter happy hour, with cocktails and music! This week, featuring the New Orleans Nightingales

 

The Breton Sound

Gasa Gasa (9 p.m.)

with Pinkerton

 

Nathan and the Zydeco Cha Chas

Rock n Bowl (8:30 p.m.)

Zydeco Night!

 

Soul Rebels

Le Bon Temps Roule (11 p.m.)

Brass band jam on Magazine Street!


Festival Brings Drumming, Dancing to Tulane


The summer heat is making it increasingly difficult to stay active, but The 15th Annual New Orleans Dance Festival is giving locals a chance to work out indoors. The fest is taking over Tulane campus next week, Monday July 1st through Friday July 5th. Sponsored by the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation, events are open to the public, with one drumming class and one dance class being taught daily in room 300 of McWilliams Hall at a cost of $10 each.

 

The dance class will be taught by native Haitian folkloric dancer and choreographer, Menahem Laurent, while the drumming class will be taught by master Haitian drummer Damas “Fan Fan” Louis. The drumming classes will be held from 5:45 pm to 6:45 pm, Monday through Wednesday with early classes starting at 9:45 am on Thursday and Friday and going until 10:45 am. The dance classes will be from 7 pm to 8:30 pm Monday through Wednesday, and from 11am to 12:30pm on Thursday and Friday.

 

Other collaborators for this event include the Tekrema Center for Arts and Culture, the Ashé Cultural Arts Center, Luther Gray of Bamboola 2000 and adjunct dance faculty member at Tulane, Ausettua Jackson.

 

Festival Director and Tulane dance professor, Beverly Trask, says the purpose of this event is to “highlight the importance and significance of the African heritage in New Orleans.” She further stated that dancers here in New Orleans have expressed a great interest in learning and studying particularly the Haitian influences that so dominate New Orleans culture, “and this gives them that opportunity as well as also to the city as a whole.”

 

The Maafa Commemoration on Saturday July 6 at Congo Square is happening in conjunction with this event. According to the Ashe Cultural Center’s webpage, MAAFA is a Kiswahili word that means "great tragedy" or "horrific tragedy," referring to the period of the Transatlantic Slave Trade. The word comes from Dr. Marimba Ani, African-American scholar and author.

 

“Maafa is a celebration of ancestry and the spirit of slaves,” says Trask in a release. “It will be a wonderful event for participants to experience."

 

The Center sites he MAAFA Commemoration as an opportunity for the whole community to pause and reflect on the horrors of slavery, and to agree as a community to distance ourselves institutionally in word and deed from that transgression. This commemoration will also include drummers and musicians as well as a procession. Participants are encouraged to wear all white.

 

For more information on the Dance Festivals classes or events please contact Beverly Trask at 504-812-4553.

 




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Ian Hoch, Will Dilella, Chris Rinaldi, Lianna Patch, Phil Yiannopoulos, Cate Czarnecki, Mary Kilpatrick, Norris Ortolano, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Kailyn Davillier, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham

Staff Writers

Kerem Ozkan, Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings

Elisabeth Morgan

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Robert, Daniel Paschall

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Deputy Managing Editor

M.D. Dupuy

Managing Editor

Stephen Babcock

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.