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THE

Defender Picks

 

JEUDI

August 28th

Ogden After Hours
Ogden Museum, 6-8p.m.
This week ft. Troy Sawyer ($10)

 

Mark Powell: The Sheltering
Maple Street Book Shop, 6p.m.

Southern author reads from his new thriller

 

Saints vs. Baltimore Ravens
Superdome, 7p.m.

Pregame the preseason in Champions Square at 4

 

Zephyrs vs. Memphis
Zephyr Stadium, 7p.m.
Local baseball in Metairie

 

Bug
Allways Lounge, 8p.m.

Darkly comedic play written by Tracy Letts—final performance

 

Bishop Allen
the BEATnik, 8p.m.

Lovable indie pop band on tour from NY ($10)

 

Terence Higgins, Cliff Hines
Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.

Two local powerhouses join forces ($10)

 

1st Annual Positive Hip-Hop
Cafe Istanbul, 9p.m.

Freestyle battle with a $500 grand prize

VENDREDI

August 29th

Mad Decent Block Party
Mardi Gras World, 2p.m.
Ft. A$AP Ferg, Big Gigantic, Dillon Francis & more ($45)

 

Friday Nights At NOMA
NOMA, 6-8p.m.

Art historians speak on Hale Woodruff’s murals, plus music by Arpa Quartet

 

Beach Day, Ben Polar One Man Band
Siberia, 6p.m.
Surf-punk from Hollywood, Florida—early show

 

Zephyrs vs. Memphis
Zephyr Stadium, 7p.m.

Local baseball in Metairie

 

The Producers
Southport Hall, 7:30p.m.

The 80s new wave band, live! ($20)

 

Underdogcentral HeadPhones Release Party
Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.

Ft. Lyriqs Da Lyraciss, Dappa, Kaye the Beast, No Suh, Kash Akbar

 

Amanda Shires
Freret Street Publiq House, 9p.m.

Texas singer and violinist (and wife of Jason Isbell)

 

Foundation Free Fridays
Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Ft. Gravity A’s tribute to the Talking Heads

 

TNM Presents: The Match Game
Shadowbox Theatre, 10:30p.m.

The New Movement resurrects the ‘70s game show for laughs ($8)


Fantastic Four: Emerson String Quartet Returns with Bartók's Boldest


by Joe Shriner

St. Joseph’s Day’s not the only reason to be celebrating this Tuesday. On March 19, in Dixion Hall at Tulane University, the internationally lionized Emerson String Quartet will be back in New Orleans performing string quartets by Haydn, Schumann, and Bartók.

 

These pieces represent three centuries of the string quartet as a powerful genre in chamber music, scored by three of the form’s greatest composers, and will be performed by musicians at the top of their profession.

 

One doesn’t necessarily have to be a classical music aficionado to have heard of the Emerson Quartet, who in their 37-year tenure have developed a reputation as the premier string quartet in America. In addition to having recorded stacks of highly regarded albums over the past three decades, they have won nine Grammy Awards, three Gramophone Awards, and the Avery Fisher Prize for outstanding achievement in classical music. Their international renown and continuing praise by music fans and critics alike causes them to draw a pretty large crowd.

 

This Tuesday should certainly prove to be no different. New Orleans Friends of Music will be presenting the Emerson Quartet on their stage in Dixon Hall at Tulane University at 8 pm. Preceding the performance at 7 p.m., Friends of Music will be continuing its free pre-concert lecture series presented by a musicologist who will discuss in detail the pieces being performed.

 

The pieces Emerson will be performing are part of their regular repertoire. Joseph Haydn’s String Quartet, Opus, 20, No. 4, is considered among the works that Haydn wrote in 1772 that defined the model of what we now consider the string quartet, paving the way for orchestration by future composers.

 

Robert Schumann’s String Quartet in A Major is the composer’s first attempt at writing a string quartet, and perhaps because of having less of a grasp on the form, creates an innovative romantic work that strays from the Haydn mold, but has no less of a powerful effect.

 

The Emerson Quartet won a Grammy in 1989 for their interpretation of Béla Bartók’s string quartets. On Tuesday, they will be performing Bartók’s possibly most thematically and structurally complex of them: String Quartet, No. 3. This piece has no breaks between the four parts, creating one long movement. Because of its intricacy, the dissonance and beauty of the piece could easily be lost on less accomplished musicians. Being able to see the Emerson Quartet perform Bartók’s No. 3 should be motivation enough to attend for those on the fence.

 

This is not the first time the Emerson Quartet has performed in New Orleans. In fact, this is the 18th time they will be performing on the Friends of Music stage. Those who would wish to see the members of the current 34-year-old line up, however, be sure not to miss this performance. At the end of this concert season cellist David Finckel will be replaced Paul Watkins while he moves on to focus more time his own artistic endeavors.

 

Tickets are $30. Pre-concert lecture is free. For more information, visit the Friends of Music website or call (504) 895-0690.




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings Editor

Anna Gaca

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock