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VENDREDI

May 26th

Bayou Country Superfest

Mercedes Benz Superdome, 11AM

Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton, Rascal Flatts and many more

 

Magazine St. Art Market

Dat Dog, 4PM

Happy hour + local art

 

Royal Street Stroll

200-900 Blocks of Royal St, 530PM

Led by the Krewe of Cork

 

YP Family Game Night

Urban League of Greater New Orleans, 6PM

Game night for young professionals and their families

 

Toonces and Friends

Marigny Opera House, 7PM

An orchestral journey through time

 

Spektrum Fridays

Techno Club, 10PM

Featuring J.DUB’L and residents Erica and Rye

 

New Thousand + Adrian

Balcony Music Club, 11PM

Violin centered hip hop

 

Free Music Series

Fulton Ally, 10PM

Featuring Bubl Trubl

SAMEDI

May 27th

Palmer Park, 10AM
The May edition of the monthly art market
 
New Orleans Jazz Market, 3PM
Light bites, drinks, DJs
 
Bar Redux, 7PM
Horror, fantasy, and spiritual movies from 13 countries
 
Bacchanel Fine Wine and Spirits, 7:30PM
Progressive jazz from one of the cities best
 
The Howlin Wolf, 8PM
Improvisational funk music
 
Joan Mitchell Center, 8PM
Monthly open mic
 
The Orpheum Theater, 9PM
Tremaine The Tour with support by Mike Angel
 
Santos Bar, 10PM
Mind expanding multi genre music

DIMANCHE

May 28th

NOLA MIX Records, 11AM
Teaching kids to DJ and produce beats
 
The Courtyard Brewery, 3PM
Raffle, silent auction, craft beer
 
Mags on Elysian Fields, 7PM
A new series dedicated to pushing the limits of contemporary music
 
Three Keys, 7PM
OC cabaret goes Sci-Fi
 
UNO Lakefront Arena, 8PM
Celebrating the 20th anniversary of her debut album
 
One Eyed Jacks, 10PM
Remixes, edits and originals of Fleetwood Mac
 
Rare Form, 10PM
Vintage sounds of American Root Music

Fantastic Four: Emerson String Quartet Returns with Bartók's Boldest


by Joe Shriner

St. Joseph’s Day’s not the only reason to be celebrating this Tuesday. On March 19, in Dixion Hall at Tulane University, the internationally lionized Emerson String Quartet will be back in New Orleans performing string quartets by Haydn, Schumann, and Bartók.

 

These pieces represent three centuries of the string quartet as a powerful genre in chamber music, scored by three of the form’s greatest composers, and will be performed by musicians at the top of their profession.

 

One doesn’t necessarily have to be a classical music aficionado to have heard of the Emerson Quartet, who in their 37-year tenure have developed a reputation as the premier string quartet in America. In addition to having recorded stacks of highly regarded albums over the past three decades, they have won nine Grammy Awards, three Gramophone Awards, and the Avery Fisher Prize for outstanding achievement in classical music. Their international renown and continuing praise by music fans and critics alike causes them to draw a pretty large crowd.

 

This Tuesday should certainly prove to be no different. New Orleans Friends of Music will be presenting the Emerson Quartet on their stage in Dixon Hall at Tulane University at 8 pm. Preceding the performance at 7 p.m., Friends of Music will be continuing its free pre-concert lecture series presented by a musicologist who will discuss in detail the pieces being performed.

 

The pieces Emerson will be performing are part of their regular repertoire. Joseph Haydn’s String Quartet, Opus, 20, No. 4, is considered among the works that Haydn wrote in 1772 that defined the model of what we now consider the string quartet, paving the way for orchestration by future composers.

 

Robert Schumann’s String Quartet in A Major is the composer’s first attempt at writing a string quartet, and perhaps because of having less of a grasp on the form, creates an innovative romantic work that strays from the Haydn mold, but has no less of a powerful effect.

 

The Emerson Quartet won a Grammy in 1989 for their interpretation of Béla Bartók’s string quartets. On Tuesday, they will be performing Bartók’s possibly most thematically and structurally complex of them: String Quartet, No. 3. This piece has no breaks between the four parts, creating one long movement. Because of its intricacy, the dissonance and beauty of the piece could easily be lost on less accomplished musicians. Being able to see the Emerson Quartet perform Bartók’s No. 3 should be motivation enough to attend for those on the fence.

 

This is not the first time the Emerson Quartet has performed in New Orleans. In fact, this is the 18th time they will be performing on the Friends of Music stage. Those who would wish to see the members of the current 34-year-old line up, however, be sure not to miss this performance. At the end of this concert season cellist David Finckel will be replaced Paul Watkins while he moves on to focus more time his own artistic endeavors.

 

Tickets are $30. Pre-concert lecture is free. For more information, visit the Friends of Music website or call (504) 895-0690.




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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily