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THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

July 22nd

Josh Weil: The Great Glass Sea
Garden District Books, 6p.m.
Author’s new book is set in an alternative contemporary Russia

 

Life Itself
Chalmette Movies, 7:30p.m.
New doc about the life of critic Roger Ebert

 

James Wallace & the Naked Light, Julie Odell
Mudlark Theatre, 8p.m.
Sweetly folky pop from Nashville ($5)

 

A Sunny Day in Glasgow
Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.
Brooklyn-based shoegaze pop ($10)

 

Treme Brass Band
d.b.a., 9p.m.
The 6th Ward's brass band saunters over to Frenchmen

 

Rebirth Brass Band
Maple Leaf, 10p.m.
2 sets by the Grammy-winning brass band

MERCREDI

July 23rd

The Apartment
Prytania Theatre, 10a.m.
1960 classic inspired creators of Mad Men

 

Snowpiercer
Theatres at Canal Place, 7p.m.
N.O. Film Society presents Bong Joon-ho’s new film ($12.50)

 

Dave Hill, Fayard Lindsey
One Eyed Jacks, 8p.m.
Comedy presented by Hell Yes Fest ($15)

 

Dinky Tao Poetry
Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 8p.m.
Weekly open poetry hour hosted by Jacob Dilson

 

Surrender the Fall, Artifas, Colossal Heads
Southport Hall, 8:30p.m.
Heavy rock out of Memphis ($10)

 

Peter Matthew Bauer, Ben Jones, Skyler Skelset
Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.
Former bassist of The Walkmen ($10)
 

JEUDI

July 24th

Crescent City Farmers Market
3700 Orleans Ave., 3p.m.-7p.m.
Midcity edition of the city's prime local market

 

Ogden After Hours
Ogden Museum, 6-8p.m.
This week ft. country rockers Pontchartrain Wrecks

 

Thursdays at Twilight
City Park Botanical Garden, 6p.m.
This week ft. Paul Sanchez ($10)

 

Dying City
Shadowbox Theatre, 7:30p.m.
Christopher Shinn’s play about the social effects of the Iraq War ($15)

 

Gisela in Her Bathtub & A Hand of Bridge
Marigny Opera House, 8p.m.
9th Ward Opera Company presents two one-act operas ($20)

 

20,000 Days On Earth
Zeitgeist, 7:30p.m.
Advance screening of the Nick Cave doc

 

Yojimbo, Down By Law
Joy Theatre, 7p.m.
Double feature worthy of the Criterion Collection

 

Coathangers, White Fang, Trampoline Team, Bottom Feeders
Siberia, 7p.m.
Feminist punk rockers at the early show ($8)

 

Reggae Night
Blue Nile, 11p.m.
Hosted by DJ T-Roy
 

VENDREDI

July 25th

Friday Nights at NOMA
NOMA, 5-9p.m.
Murals On Screen film series begins with Multiple Perspectives: the Crazy Machine

 

Gal Holiday & the Honky-Tonk Revue
Siberia, 6p.m.
Authentic N.O. honky-tonk rock (free)

 

Zephyrs vs. Omaha
Zephyr Stadium, 7p.m.
Local baseball in Metairie

 

Closed Curtain
Zeitgeist, 7:30p.m.
Jafar Panahi made his new film despite Iran’s ban on his work

 

Dying City
Shadowbox Theatre, 7:30p.m.
Christopher Shinn’s play about the social effects of the Iraq War ($20)

 

Johnny Angel & Helldorado
Old U.S. Mint, 8p.m.
Country Western swing from New Orleans ($10)

 

Gisela in Her Bathtub & A Hand of Bridge
Marigny Opera House, 8p.m.
9th Ward Opera Company presents two one-act operas ($20)

 

King Buzzo, Dax Riggs
One Eyed Jacks, 9p.m.
Melvins leader goes solo acoustic ($15)

 

The Hood Internet, Jermaine Quiz
Hi-Ho Lounge, 9p.m.
Mashup DJ extraordinaires ($12)

 

PUJOL, Natural Child, Heavy Lids, Planchettes
Siberia, 10p.m.
Garage rock from Nashville & NOLA

 

Foundation Free Fridays
Tipitina’s, 10p.m.
This week ft. Eddie Roberts & Friends

 

Rocky Horror Picture Show
Prytania, 10p.m.
Ft. The Well Hung Speakers shadow cast


Elbert Guillory Explains Party Switch, 'Government Plantation' (VIDEO)


Recently, State Sen. Elbert Guillory became the latest Louisiana pol to pull the party switch, making the Democratic state senator a Republican one. Now, weeks after that switch was announced, Guillory released a video on "Why I'm a Republican." 

 

The professional quality video was filmed with Guillory standing alone, and comes out swinging with a historical timeline that alleges that his new party is the party of progress for African American voters, and that the Democrats' agenda is derived from slave owners and attempts to subjugate the black community with welfare and social programs. 

 

Within the first twenty seconds of the video, Sen. Guillory is adamant that not only did he make the right choice by switching to the Republican party, but that, "All his brothers and sisters," (his words), should make the switch, since the Republican party has their best interests in mind.

 

"You see, in recent history, the Democrat[ic] party has created the 'illusion' that their agenda and their policies are what's best for black people," Guillory said. "Somehow it has been forgotten that the Republican party was founded in 1854 as an abolitionist movement, with one simple creed: that slavery is a violation of the rights of man."

 

Guillory then goes further into his own reasons for rebranding himself, quoting Frederick Douglass on the merits of the 1800's Republican party, then mentioning that Abraham Lincoln was the first Republican president, and how former slaves were given citizenship and rights by the Republicans of that time.

 

"The Democrats, on the other hand, were the party of Jim Crow," Guillory continued, making mention of the illegal and unequal treatment that continued to exist in racially divisive climates, again, back in the late 1800's and through the 1900's. "It was the Democrats who defended the rights of slave owners.

 

"You see, at the heart of liberalism, is the idea that only a great and powerful big Government can be the benefactor of social justice for all Americans," Guillory said. "But the left is only concerned with one thing: control."

 

Guillory also mentions that it was under Republican President Dwight Eisenhower that the Civil Rights act came into law, and that a Democrat rallied against the bill with an attempted filibuster.

 

Guillory makes no mention, however, that the late Sen. Strom Thurmond, who served for 48-years and is perhaps most famous for this attempted filibuster of Civil Rights legislation—a filibuster that went for nearly 24-hours— actually switched from being a Democratic 'dixiecrat' to a Republican, mostly because he was against these civil rights laws.

 

One should also note that while Sen. Guillory's historical statements are correct about the history of the two parties, since that time, both the Democratic and Republican parties have been through realignments, or drastic changes in policy and platform—so the Democrats of the 1860's were the conservative party and the Republicans, at that time, were almost revolutionaries. This is back before things like the New Deal with FDR, the Civil Rights Act, or the Republican Revolution in the 1980s and 1990s, which saw the Republican party begin aligning themselves more and more with religious ideology and a conservative base to establish a solid voter pool. So, now, in modern voting terms, the Republicans are now the conservatives and the Democrats are the liberals (neither of which is wrong, but that is where the parties stand).

 

The senator then goes on to assert that social programs like welfare are an instrument of subjugation rather than a form of aid, and specifically are a way of continuing to subjugate the black community.

 

"And [Democrats] disguise this control as charity," Guillory said. "The fact that blacks, or anyone for that matter, need the government to get ahead in life is despicable."

 

He then cites the programs as failures, because our communities are as poor as they've ever been, the schools are failing just as much, and our prisons are, "filled with young black men, who should be at home, being fathers."

 

Sen. Guillory also debated the merits of freedom, falling now, for the first time in the video, on the modern Republican platform. How the economy must remain, "free of persuasion" (aka: free of financial regulations or consumer protections), but then also cites freedom of the press and also having emails free from Government search and seizure.

 

"But most importantly, it is the idea that the individual must be free to pursue his or her own happiness, free from Government dependence, and free from Government control," Sen. Guillory said. "Because to be truly free, is to be reliant on no one, other than the author of our destiny," taking care to point toward the sky. "These are the ideas are at the core of Republican party... My brothers and sisters of the American community, please join me in abandoning the 'Government plantation' and the party of disappointment.”

 

In response to this oral history by Guillory, the Democratic party responded with some statements of their own.

 

"Guillory keeps pointing to events decades in the past," said Kirstin Alvanitakis, who is the Communications Director for the Louisiana Democratic Party. "But let's look at what's happening today. Just this month a Texas Republican said, 'I’m going to be real honest with you, the Republican Party doesn’t want black people to vote.' That tells you all you need to know about the Republican Party's outreach to African Americans."

 

Alvanitakis also claimed that this move by Guillory is less about protecting freedom and promoting a people, as it is about political maneuvering.

 

"Elbert Guillory's motivation has nothing to do with civil rights or freedom, and it has everything to do with his plan to run for lieutenant governor."

 

Alvanitakis cited a Lafayette radio station interview with Sen. Guillory on KNEK, where the senator apparently said that switching parties, "certainly puts me in a better position to run for higher office." 

 

"In that same interview, [Guillory] said, 'I change parties like I change underwear,'" Alvanitakis continued. "Given statements like that, it's hard to put faith in anything Elbert Guillory says, since he's liable to change it tomorrow."

 

CORRECTION Due to an editing error, an earlier version of this article erroneously stated that Guillory gaven an interview on Lafayette radio station KPEL. He actually gave the interview on KNEK.




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings Editor

Anna Gaca

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Managing Editor

Stephen Babcock

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.