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THE

Defender Picks

 

MERCREDI

May 24th

Jazz Pilates

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 12PM

Led by renowned jazz vocalist Stephanie Jordan

 

Happy Hour Sessions

The Foundation Room, 5PM

Featuring the raw blues and smokey femininity of Hedijo

 

Shake It Break It Band

21st Amendment, 5PM

Step back in time and enjoy some tunes

 

Lighting from a Theatrical Perspective

NOLA Community Printshop, 6PM

Hosted by veteran Lighting Designer, Andrew J. Merkel

 

Free Spirited Yoga

The Tchoup Yard, 6:30PM

Free yoga, optional beer and food

 

Big Easy Playboys

Bank Street Bar, 7PM

Mixing roots, rock, and blues

 

Think Less, Hear More

Hi-Ho Lounge, 9PM

Spontaneous compositions to projected movies

 

 

JEUDI

May 25th

Soft Opening

Royal Brewery, 11AM

Come celebrate the opening of NOLA’s newest brewery

 

Doreen’s Jazz New Orleans

Royal Street, FQ, 11AM

Doreen Ketchens and her band

 

Jazz in the Park

New Orleans Armstrong Park, 4PM

Music by Honey Island Swamp Band + Hot 8 Brass Band

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 6PM

Featuring the funky sounds of Margie Perez

 

Conversation: On Cecilia Vicuña

Contemporary Arts Center, 7PM

Discussion on the “About to Happen” exhibition

 

JD Hill & The Jammers

Bar Redux, 8PM

R&B, rock blues, and everything in between

 

Luke Winslow King

Tipitina’s, 9PM

Support by The Washboard Rodeo

 

Dave Easley

Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 10PM

Witness one of the city’s best guitarists

 

VENDREDI

May 26th

Bayou Country Superfest

Mercedes Benz Superdome, 11AM

Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton, Rascal Flatts and many more

 

Magazine St. Art Market

Dat Dog, 4PM

Happy hour + local art

 

Royal Street Stroll

200-900 Blocks of Royal St, 530PM

Led by the Krewe of Cork

 

YP Family Game Night

Urban League of Greater New Orleans, 6PM

Game night for young professionals and their families

 

Toonces and Friends

Marigny Opera House, 7PM

An orchestral journey through time

 

Spektrum Fridays

Techno Club, 10PM

Featuring J.DUB’L and residents Erica and Rye

 

New Thousand + Adrian

Balcony Music Club, 11PM

Violin centered hip hop

 

Free Music Series

Fulton Ally, 10PM

Featuring Bubl Trubl


Dispersants Could've Disrupted Gulf Ecosystem, Study Says


by Mary-Devon Dupuy

Back during the Big Oozy, BP touted their use of dispersants to make the oil go away, but skeptics questioned wihether the chemicals would have lasting impacts on the Gulf's ecosystem, and the health of the people who live on the Coast. On the ecosystem front, a new study from the Dauphin Island Sea Lab indicates the skeptics were on the right track. The study, released yeterday, concluded that dispersants disturb marine food chains and ultimately do more harm than good for the Gulf.

 

Dispersants like the Corexit that was used in the Gulf have roughly the same chemical makeup of household dish soap. During the Deepwater Horizon diasaster, dispersants were sprayed directly at the head of the leaking well, in the air over the Gulf and everywhere in ebtween. They are intended to break down surface slicks and make them easier to eat for naturally occurring microbial communities. The results of the study indicate that food for microbes equates to less food for phytoplankton.

 

DISL Marine Scientist Dr. Alice Ortmann led the study with other experts in microbial and plankton ecology by measuring the flow of carbons, the “currency,” of energy exchange, between separate pieces of a larger food chain. The team observed that the addition of dispersants to a marine ecosystem caused a decrease in phytoplankton and an increase in microbes. The cycle continues upwards: phytoplankton (tiny plants) are food for zooplankton, which are food for fish. Dwindling resources for fish equate to a big red flag for seafood lovers on shore, the study says.

 

Ortmann writes, “When we added oil by itself it remained on the surface as a slick and resulted in similar conditions in the water column to what would typically occur. However, when dispersant was added, either alone or with oil, the phytoplankton decreased and were replace d by micbrobes.”

 

The study was issued along with a warning that the research on dispersants is still its infancy, but the team urged the industry not to become complacent.




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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily