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THE

Defender Picks

 

JEUDI

September 18th

Jazz in the Park
Armstrong Park, 4-8p.m.

This week ft. Shamar Allen and the Underdawgs and Colin Lake

 

Thursday Nights At Twilight
City Park Botanical Garden

This week ft. John Autin

 

Ogden After Hours
Ogden Museum, 6-8p.m.

This week ft. Edward David Anderson

 

Micah McKee and Little Maker
Blue Nile, 7p.m.

Folksy local singer-songwriter

 

Earth, King Dude
One Eyed Jacks, 7p.m.

Minimal instrumental and drone metal pioneers

 

A Lie of the Mind
Midcity Theatre, 7:30p.m.

Sam Shepard’s award-winning play looks deep into families’ anguish ($20)

 

Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike
Le Petit Theatre, 8p.m.
Christopher Durang’s Tony-winning comedy takes Chekhovian figures to Pennsylvania ($35+)

 

The Noise Complaints
Circle Bar, 10p.m.
Two-man NOLA rock’n’roll

 

Timecode:nola Premiere Party
d.b.a., 10p.m.
Filmmakers debut original shorts, each shot on one roll of Super 8 film

VENDREDI

September 19th

Music Under the Oaks
Audubon Park Newman Bandstand, 4:30-6p.m.

This week ft. Loyola Jazz Alumni Jam

 

Friday Nights at NOMA
NOMA, 5-10p.m.

Music by Cindy Scott and an outdoor screening of Sunset Boulevard

 

Makers: Women in Comedy
Ashé Cultural Arts Center, 6p.m.
Part of a PBS series on women in historically male-dominated industries (free)

 

Concerts in the Courtyard
Historic N.O. Collection, 6-8p.m.
This week ft. Debbie Davis and the Mesmerizers ($10)

 

2014: A Strauss Odyssey
Mahalia Jackson Theatre, 7:30p.m.
LPO’s 2014-2015 season kicks off ft. soprano Susanna Phillips ($20-$99)

 

A Lie of the Mind
Midcity Theatre, 7:30p.m.
Sam Shepard’s award-winning play looks deep into families’ anguish ($20)

 

Tim and Eric
The Civic, 8p.m.
Adult Swim goofs bring their absurd comedy tour to NOLA ($40)

 

Thin Walls
Shadowbox Theater, 8p.m.
A dark comedy by Michael Allen Zell

 

Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike
Le Petit Theatre, 8p.m.
Christopher Durang’s Tony-winning comedy takes Chekhovian figures to Pennsylvania ($35+)

 

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
NOCCA Nims Black Box Theatre, 8p.m.
The NOLA Project presents a stage adapation of Ken Kesey’s classic ($30)

 

Dax Riggs
One Eyed Jacks, 9p.m.
Local metal legend

 

Katey Red, Chilldren, Magnolia Rhome
Siberia, 9p.m.
Bounce night also ft. BJ So Cole, Da Danger Boyz, DJ Lil Man


Soul Sister’s 8th Annual Birthday Jam
Tipitina’s, 10p.m.
Ft. DJ Soul Sister and DJ Maseo of De La Soul

 

Debauche, Smoke n Bones
Maison, 10:30p.m.
Russian folk-punk and NOLA funk at Maison tonight

SAMEDI

September 20th

Pratik Patel of the African Wildlife Trust
Audubon Zoo, 6p.m.
Tanzanian wildlife official speaks on conservation

 

A Lie of the Mind
Midcity Theatre, 7:30p.m.
Sam Shepard’s award-winning play looks deep into families’ anguish ($20)

 

Thin Walls
Shadowbox Theater, 8p.m.
A dark comedy by Michael Allen Zell

 

Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike
Le Petit Theatre, 8p.m.
Christopher Durang’s Tony-winning comedy takes Chekhovian figures to Pennsylvania ($35+)

 

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
NOCCA Nims Black Box Theatre, 8p.m.
The NOLA Project presents a stage adaption of Ken Kesey’s classic ($30)

 

Dr. John & The Nite Trippers
Joy Theater, 9p.m.
A New Orleans legend returns home from tour

 

Afghan Whigs
Civic, 9p.m.
Cincinnati alt rockers return with their first new album in a decade ($30)

 

Lost Bayou Ramblers, The Other Planets
One Eyed Jacks, 9p.m.
Get lost with this Grammy-nominated Cajun band

 

Black & Gold Kick Off Party
Tipitina’s, 10p.m.
Celebrate Saints season with Dumpstaphunk, Good Enough For Good Times, & Gypsyphonic Disko ($17)

 

Merchandise
Siberia, 10p.m.
Tampa post-punk; playing with Direct Attack, Heat Dust, TV-MA ($8)

 

Siren Sea
Circle Bar, 10p.m.
Independent pop duo from Dallas ($5)

 

Big Sam's Funky Nation
Blue Nile, 10p.m.
Trombonist "Big Sam" Williams leads this municipality of Who Dat Nation

 

Hot 8 Brass Band
d.b.a., 11p.m.

Experience the brass band that locals love ($10)

 

Debauche
Carrollton Station, 11p.m.
NOLA’s only Russian Mafia band play a late-night show Uptown

DIMANCHE

September 21st

Saints vs. Minnesota Vikings
Superdome, 12p.m.

First home game of the regular season. Geaux Saints!!

 

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
NOCCA Nims Black Box Theatre, 2p.m.
The NOLA Project presents a stage adapation of Ken Kesey’s classic ($30)

 

Thin Walls
Shadowbox Theater, 4p.m.
A dark comedy by Michael Allen Zell

 

Louisiana History Alive!
Shadowbox Theatre, 8p.m
.
This month ft. Baroness Pontalba and "Mother of Orphans" Margaret Haughery

 

Gal Holiday & the Honky-Tonk Revue
Chickie Wah Wah, 8p.m.

Authentic N.O. honky-tonk rock

 

Hot 8 Brass Band
Howlin Wolf Den, 10p.m.
Experience the brass band locals love

 

Elaine Greer
Circle Bar, 10p.m.
Singer-songwriter based in Austin, TX ($5)


Desert Campaign

Lower 9 Food Access Coalition Identifies Obstacles to Food Desert, Names Goals



The Lower Ninth Ward has been a hot topic since Katrina devastated the area, but smatterings of new homes and nonprofits can only do so much for the neighborhood’s long-term revitalization. People need to eat, and the closest thing Lower Ninth residents have to a grocery store is a Wal Mart in Chalmette, three miles from their homes. 

 

 

The Lower 9th Food Access Coalition emerged from within the community, and they’re not interested in quick fixes. The area has been classified as a “food desert” since before the federal flood. The U.S.D.A. defines a food desert as any population of 500 or more that does not have a grocery store within a one-mile radius. The last time residents had a mid-sized grocery store in their neighborhood was 1987.

 

The coalition aims to identify the specific forces that stand in the way of food equality, eliminate those barriers, and attract sustainable commerce to the area.

 

Founder Jenga Mwendo was born in the Lower Ninth Ward and raised between there and New Orleans East. Mwendo said one of the most critical components of her team’s initiative was reaching the members of the community and taking their specific needs into account.

 

Rather than taking to the tweetosphere, Mwendo and her team began handing out fliers door-to-door in April of 2012.

 

“We really tried hard to make sure we reached as many Lower Ninth Ward residents as possible. We were aware that email and internet are not always the best ways to reach a lot of folks down here, so we made a very conscious choice not to advertise meetings that way,” Mwendo said. “We purposefully didn’t include the locations of the meeting [on the fliers]. Instead, we instructed people to contact us first to explain to them what it was about.”

 

The coalition also spoke at monthly Neighborhood Network Empowerment Association meetings, and they dropped off fliers at businesses up and down St. Claude and Claiborne. According to Mwendo, residents are battling preconceived notions of what low-income, African-American neighborhoods mean for business.

 

“[The Lower Ninth is] a primarily low-income, African-American neighborhood with very poor access to food. Grocery store operators will say the neighborhood is risky, and they make assumptions about the potential of crime and theft from the stores,” said Mwendo.  

 

However, the Lower 9 Food Access Coalition tells a different story. According to projections from a study conducted by DePaul University, LSU, and UNO, a grocery store could be a highly lucrative endeavor. Based on data from the 2010 U.S. Census which indicates the Lower Ninth holds 3,775 households, an estimated 2,000 of those would spend over $5,000,000 a year on food consumption.

 

Currently, 61 percent of the neighborhood’s residents are homeowners. Since over 30 percent do not own cars, the grocery store would need to be located on the St. Claude commercial corridor or on Claiborne Avenue.

 

“We’re still human beings, and we still need to eat. Everybody has the right to have access to quality food,” said Mwendo. The community leader asked rhetorically, “How do you rebuild a neighborhood that’s so devastated?” The activist also noted the catch 22 in play. “People won’t come back if certain amenities aren’t there, but business owners won’t come back if there aren’t a number of people back in the neighborhood,” she said.

 

There are currently ten businesses selling any kind of food in the Lower Ninth. Out of these, only four are black-owned, seven sell junk food, three sell limited fresh meat, and only two sell limited fresh produce.

 

Access to high quality food becomes a human rights issue when one considers the health implications of corner store dining. African-American communities experience a disproportionate rate of hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity. All of these illnesses are diet-related.

 

Mwendo said the community discussed and determined three primary solutions for their lack of food access. Lower Ninth residents would like a mobile grocery store, a healthy corner store, and a school-based grocery store.

 

“Overall, these are things that the [coalition] is committed to working towards,” said Mwendo. “Having our money stay within our community is a positive thing, and several people mentioned that there has to be ‘Mom n’ Pop,’ businesses owned by residents,” said Mwendo.

 

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings Editor

Anna Gaca

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock