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THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

September 2nd

Yulman Stadium Dedication
Tulane Yulman Stadium, 3-5p.m.
Opening ceremonies for the Green Wave’s new stadium
 

Hidden Treasures: Restaurant Edition
Old U.S. Mint, 6 & 7p.m.
Two nightly tours of the Louisiana State Museum’s collection of restaurant ephemera ($20)

 

Progression Music Series
Gasa Gasa, 8p.m.
This week ft. Barry's Pocket + Christin Bradford Band

 

Comedy Beast
Howlin Wolf Den, 8:30p.m.
Free comedy show

 

Nik Turner's Hawkwind, Witch Mountain, Hedersleben, Mountain of Wizard
Siberia, 9p.m.
Hawkwind and Space Ritual saxophonist still touring the world ($12)

 

Punk Night
Dragon’s Den, 10p.m.
This week ft. The Boy Sprouts, The Noise Complaints, Mystery Girl, Interior Decorating

 

Stanton Moore Trio
Snug Harbor, 10p.m.
Moore, Singleton, & Torkanowsky play Frenchmen on Tuesdays in September ($15)

MERCREDI

September 3rd

Restaurant Week Kickoff Party
The Chicory, 6-8p.m.
The Restaurant Association invites the public to sample bites and libations ($25)

 

The He and She Show
Siberia, 6p.m.
Live stand-up ft. Doug and Teresa Wyckoff, Andrew Polk, Molly Rubin-Long, Duncan Pace ($7)

 

“Debutante Balls”
Ashé Cultural Arts Center, 6-9p.m.

Ft. artist & transgender diversity speaker Scott Turner Schofield (free)

 

Katy Simpson Smith: The Story of Land and Sea
Columns Hotel, 7p.m.
Author presents her debut novel of the American Revolution

 

Alien Ant Farm
Southport Hall, 7:30p.m.
With Kaleido, Music from Chaos ($15)

 

Pocket Aces Brass Band
Howlin Wolf Den, 8p.m.
Get your funky brass fill on a Wednesday ($5)

 

Atlantic Thrills, Ravi Shavi
Saturn Bar, 9p.m.

Plus Trampoline Team, Native America

JEUDI

September 4th

Jazz in the Park
Armstrong Park, 4-8p.m.
This week ft. To Be Continued Brass Band & Shannon Powell Band

 

Carol McMichael Reese: New Orleans Under Reconstruction
Garden District Book Shop, 6p.m.
Panel discussion by contributors to this informed book on post-Katrina N.O.

 

Katy Simpson Smith: The Story of Land and Sea
Octavia Books, 6p.m.
Author presents her debut novel of the American Revolution

 

Hidden Treasures: Restaurant Edition
Old U.S. Mint, 6 & 7p.m.

Two nightly tours of the Louisiana State Museum’s collection of restaurant ephemera ($20)

 

Ogden After Hours
Ogden Museum, 6-8p.m.

This week ft. Mike Dillon, James Singleton and Johnny Vidacovich

 

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
NOCCA Nims Black Box Theatre, 8p.m.

The NOLA Project presents a stage adapation of Ken Kesey’s classic ($30)

VENDREDI

September 5th

Music Under the Oaks
Audubon Park Newman Bandstand, 4:30-6p.m.

This week ft. John Mahoney Big Band

 

Mark Shapiro: Carbon Shock
Octavia Books, 6p.m.

Journalist’s new book explores intersection of environment and economics

 

Dernière séance
Alliance Française, 7p.m.
A cinema manager turns killer when he learns his beloved theater will close ($5)

 

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
NOCCA Nims Black Box Theatre, 8p.m.

The NOLA Project presents a stage adapation of Ken Kesey’s classic ($30)

 

Foundation Free Fridays: Flow Tribe
Tiptina’s, 10p.m.

CD Release party with Cha Waa, Seven Handle Circus

 

Trumpet Black & The Heart Attack
d.b.a., 10p.m.
Travis “Trumpet Black” Hill keeps the New Orleans jam alive ($10)

 

Royal Teeth, Coyotes
Freret Street Publiq House, 10p.m.

Local indie pop & rock on Freret

 

Freddy Mercury Night
Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 10p.m.

Is this real life? Is just fantasy?

 

Soul Rebels Brass Band
Blue Nile, 11.p.m.

Local favorites incorporate jazz, soul, funk, & hip-hop

 

G-Eazy
Republic, 11p.m.
Loyola grad returns to his home stage ($20)

SAMEDI

September 6th

Tulane vs. Georgia Tech
Yulman Stadium, 3p.m.

Green Wave's first game at the new Uptown stadium

 

Panorama Jazz Band
Spotted Cat, 6 p.m.

Local jazz with international influence

 

Ron White
Mahalia Jackson, 8p.m.

Known as “Tater Salad” to fans of Blue Collar Comedy Tour ($57+)

 

Lombardi
Le Petite Theatre, 8p.m.
Based on the book When Pride Still Mattered: A Life of Vince Lombardi

 

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
NOCCA Nims Black Box Theatre, 8p.m.

The NOLA Project presents a stage adapation of Ken Kesey’s classic ($30)

 

The Weight, Levon Helms Band
Tiptina’s, 9p.m.

Performing the music of The Band, ft. former members of The Band plus Papa Mali ($35)

 

Stop Making Sense
Studio3 Warehouse, 9p.m.
Shotgun Cinema presents Jonathan Demme’s Talking Heads film ($10)

 

Ty Segall
One Eyed Jacks, 9p.m.

Garage rock darling plus Wand and Babes ($16)

 

Pinettes Brass Band, Street Legends Brass Band
Maison, 10p.m.

New Orleans’ only all-woman brass band

 

Cory Henry's Treme Funktet
Blue Nile, 10p.m.

Young jazz keyboardist is a Grammy winner

 

Little Freddie King
d.b.a., 11p.m.

74-year-old country blues guitarist from the Delta ($10)


Created Enchantment

A Streetcar Named Desire, Reviewed



NoDef Theatre Critic Jim Fitzmorris gets off at Elysian Fields, and heads to Michalopoulos Stuido for Southern Rep and InsideOut's production of Tennessee Williams' New Orleans-set classic of the American stage.

 

Around the midpoint of Jason Kirkpatrick's stunner production of A Streetcar Named Desire, Michael Aaron Santos' Stanley Kowalski, having endured enough insults at the hands of Aimée Hayes' Blanche Dubois, bellows at her from his bedroom:

 

 

I am not a Polack. People from Poland are Poles. They are not Polacks. But what I am is one hundred percent American. I'm born and raised in the greatest country on this earth and proud as hell of it. And don't you ever call me a Polack.

 

 

It strikes the listener like a ton of bricks: one hundred percent American. In a singular roaring moment, the entire nature of Kirkpatrick's take on what is arguably the greatest of this country's dramas comes to the foreground: a battle over identity not just on a personal level but also one of community. Stanley is the brave new world of post-war America brutally reminding his ethereal sister-in-law that she is a past time whose existence is entirely dependent on the decisions he makes. Kowalski is a stranger lacking in kindness.

 

A Streetcar Named Desire
Where: Michalapoulos Studio, 527 Elysian Fields Ave., Marigny
When: March 29-April 15; Thurs. - Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m.
Tickets: $20-35

This insight is the foundation of Southern Rep/InSideOut's bracing staging of Tennessee Williams' masterwork. A stylistic collision of slice-of-life and dream play, this Streetcar, augmented by a design firing on full-cylinders, is a gut-wrenching, romantic and, finally, devastating evening of theatre. And all of it is held together through an arresting performance by Hayes as Williams' tragic heroine. She and director Kirkpatrick not only give us a Blanche that is a painfully sympathetic lost soul but also use the construction of character to unify the stylistic choices of the play. Using Dan Zimmer's mixture of realistic and magical lighting to guide her, Hayes moves between the callous reality of poker games, beer bottles and packaged meat and into a more poetic world of expressionism and memory. Featuring uniformly, excellent performances and brilliant dramaturgy, it is in a different league from other productions in town and needs to be measured as such.

 

Underneath a pervasive sadness, Hayes' Blanche is an indefatigable optimist. The performance is an exquisite unraveling of soul and psyche, carefully calibrated without being a closed system from her fellow actors. Blanche's lonely birthday party, which is devastating on the page, is beyond heartbreaking in Kirkpatrick's production. Over the slightly lopsided cake Stella has baked for her sister, the director and actress combine to create a frozen moment of past, present and future. We see the little girl of irrepressible hopes, the anxiety-ridden disappointed woman of the moment, and the shattered shut-in to come in the glow of the birthday candles on The Kowlaski's kitchen table. Her ability to shake off the disappointments and tragedies of the past finally failing her, Hayes' creation pulls herself together one more time, instilling hope in the viewer, but in actuality only making the final indignities to come even more of a gut punch. There is not a moment in this production, despite Blanche's petty insecurities and scheming, that we believe she deserves a thing that happens to her. If you think that premise is a no-brainer, then you would be horrified how many interpretations of this play have suggested otherwise.

 

And that is the true reason the sadness strikes so deep: the contrapuntal sweetness that Hayes and her director have crafted for Williams' most famous creation. The performance works, not because of the gloomy, elegant foreboding with which Kirkpatrick and his designers have filled the space, but on account of the fact the collaborators are rooting for Blanche to pull it off. Because they are, we join them. I have always believed the measure of a great Hamlet is whether the audience starts rooting for him to escape the undiscovered country. The same is true here. We like this Blanche so much that we find ourselves willingly suspending our knowledge of the play's dark destination. Perhaps, just perhaps, there is peace of mind on the coast with Shep Huntleigh or whoever else might ride to her rescue. For this Blanche, a chivalric past, underscored by the spectral sound design of Brendan Connelly, calls to her just over the horizon.

 

If there are any skips in this otherwise pristine record, it is in the failure of the physical violence to match the emotional content. Plates do not break, slaps do not sting and punches are not landed. It is the only element in this otherwise transcendent production that rings occasionally false. The scenes of physical confrontation and overt violence feel mechanically staged rather than organically realized, and so, it has the unintended effect of ever-so-slightly disrupting the ferocious whole. It undercuts Santos' otherwise cunning performance. He sets us up by making Stanley initially seem an abrasive but fair man only to slowly show us the brutal cruelty underneath. It is a sinister take, because it makes us emotionally invested in the agent of the heartbreak that lies ahead. The fact that his violent exertions are not the measure of his emotional pyrotechnics prevents the show from putting an exclamation mark on unqualified greatness.

 

But greatness need not be perfect, and that aforementioned issue fades in the face of the evening's accumulating pleasures. The final two actors of the central quartet are the equals of the leads. Ashley Ricord Santos gives a high wire act of a performance, striking just the right balance as the true object of desire in the play. We watch her torn to and fro between the potent future offered by her dominating husband and the nostalgic dreams and guilt of her manipulative sister. If you can take your eyes off her costars, you will see a sophisticated woman who has willingly given up a more refined life for that of primal, albeit pleasurable, survival. Her performance is a series of silent decisions that leave no doubt of her inner conflict.  And the always excellent Mike Harkins uses his natural decency in creating a Mitch that makes his ultimate betrayal of The Belle from Mississippi feel on the level of The Man from Kerioth. He seemed in a perpetual place of unrequited longing, a man whose wants do not match his capacity for their realization.

 

Part of Kirkpatrick's triumph is avoiding the typical pitfalls that usually hamper the play. It why I believe, unlike my fellow critic and friend Theodore Mahne, that this production is dramaturgically and emotionally far superior to the visceral but wrongheaded 1997 staging of the tale. Along with making sure the only southern drawls are those of The Sisters Dubois, Kirkpatrick uses the terrific, humanly comical performances of supporting cast members such as Tracey Collins and Phil Karnell, as the ribald neighbors Eunice and Steve, to create a landscape that feels more New Orleans than almost any other production of this play I have seen. Monica Harris, Martin Covert, Donald Lewis, Dean Wray, Caitlyn Allison, Darnell Thomas, and Charles Buggage each strike just the right balance between fully explored characters and necessary texture to a create a portrait of the city the show usually lacks. It feels like a recognizable New Orleans rather than the easy jazz clichés or the even more offensive simply-another-southern-city landscape. Think about it this way: if it were simply Atlanta or Dallas, would Blanche be so out of place? The production knows New Orleans is not The South and establishes that reality early by having Hayes enter in one of Cecile Casey Covert's meticulous period piece garments: she is a ghostly, radiant presence of poetry in a grimy, vibrant naturalism. A lovely memory of an America that never was.

 

Kirkpatrick and set designer Bill Walker understand Stanley is neither poor nor a slob. With the faintest hint of Jo Mielziner's original design and a large assist from The Michalopoulos Studio location, Walker builds a world justified in the text by The Kowalskis' modest but growing finances and creates an apartment that is not squalor but cramped and claustrophobic. A man who was a master sergeant, is his company's top representative and can afford both participation in a bowling league and a night at Galatoire's might be a vulgarian but he certainly is not poor. The only reason Stanley does not own a home is the post war housing shortage and the fact that the G.I. Bill is a year away. Kirkpatrick knows this and makes sure we do as well. He resists the easy urge to set the play in a fictional Lower Slobovia that has grounded other, lesser productions. Instead, as the lights fade and Blanche recedes into the shadows, we know too well it is only a matter of time before Stanley packs up the family into his car, heads on out to Gentilly and into the heart of "the greatest country on this earth."

This is a magnificent

This is a magnificent rendition of the classic play. It makes fall in love with New Orleans and Tennessee Williams all over again! STELLLLLAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!

Excellent review! I saw this

Excellent review!

I saw this production during the Tennessee Williams Festival, and I must say it is simply outstanding!!! Amazing performances. And the stage set... 632 Elysian Fields... OMG... what a beautiful, New Orleans theatre set.

Kudos!

Hi, Appending photo credits

Hi,

Appending photo credits is the responsibility of the editors, not the writers. The photo has now been credited.

Thanks,

NOLA Defender Editors

Jim Fitzmorris, I am the

Jim Fitzmorris,
I am the photographer that took the photo you used on your "Streetcar Named Desire" review.

http://noladefender.com/content/created-3enchantment45

The photo is copyright to me.

Please add the credit "Photo by Ride Hamilton" below the image.

I believe you understand how important it is for photographers to get proper credit when their photos are used.

Thank you.
Ride Hamilton

(Please remember to credit the photographers! They work hard to give you images to use!)

Desire Photo © Ride Hamilton

Desire Photo © Ride Hamilton

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings Editor

Anna Gaca

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock