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Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

LUNDI GRAS

February 27th

Red Beans Parade

Marigny Route, 2PM

9th annual march celebrating NOLA's famous Lundi dish

 

Krewe of Proteus

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 5:15PM

The second-oldest parading krewe offers a legendary look at Carnival festivities 

 

Krewe of Orpheus

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 6PM

Harry Connick Jr.'s superkrewe is joined by Westworld actors and an SNL comedian

 

Washboard Chaz

The Carver Theater, 7PM

Washboard Chaz takes a break from The Tin Men tonight to lead the Lundi Gras Blues Party

 

Igor and the Red Elvises

Siberia, 6PM

Russian surf rock comes to St. Claude

 

Big Chief Alfred Doucette

Bar Redux, 8PM

Flaming Arrow Warriors Chief is joined by JD Hill & the Jammers, Big Pearl, and the Fugitives of Funk

 

Alexis & the Samurai

Chickie Wah Wah, 8PM

Indie folk duo perform every Monday

 

The Soul Rebels

Blue Nile, 11PM

Brass legends bring da funk

 

Galactic

Tipitina's, 11PM

Funk legends ($50)

 

MARDI GRAS

February 28th

Jefferson City Buzzards

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 6:45AM

The world's oldest Mardi Gras marching club kicks off the day's celebrations

 

Lyons Carnival Club

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 7AM

Catch them at one of their 10 stops, or meet them for drink at Molly's at the Market at the end of their parade

 

Mondo Kayo Social & Marching Club 

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 7:45AM

Follow Mondo Kayo to be led to an all-day dance party on Frenchmen

 

Pete Fountain's Half-Fast Walking Club

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 7:45AM

Clarinet legend leads his walking krewe to wake up the city for its big party

 

Zulu Social Aide and Pleasure Club

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 8AM

Storied African American krewe is set to dole out coconuts and joy 

 

Societe de Saint Anne

French Quarter Route, 10AM

Wander the Vieux Carre for this parade 

 

KOE

French Quarter Route, 10:15AM

A "cyber" krewe of Carnival enthusiasts from all over the world

 

Rex

Uptown-St. Charles Route, 10AM

Keep an eye out for the iconic Bouef Gras float 

 

Elks Orleanians / Crescent City

Uptown-St. Charles Route, Follows Rex

These truck parades let anyone with wheels join in on the Mardi Gras fun

 

Mardi Gras Indian Orchestra Memoria for Big Chief Roddy Lewis & Tim Green

Hi-Ho Lounge, 3PM

Featuring Jimbo Mathus' Overstuffed Po-boys

 

Fat Tuesday Fish Fry

Bar Redux, 6PM

Annual Mardi Gras fry with local catfish, handcut fries, and homemade slaw

 

Treme Brass Band

d.b.a., 9PM

See the legendary band on their home turf

 

Organized Crime

30/90, 9PM

NOLA funk-jam band with a rotating cast of band members 

 

Smokin' Time Jazz Club

The Spotted Cat, 10PM

Trad jazz masters

 

Rebirth Brass Band

Maple Leaf, 10:30PM

2 sets by the Grammy-winning brass band

 

Jason Neville Band

Vaso, 11:59PM

Member of the famed Neville clan leads his band

 

MERCREDI

March 1st

Dr. Seuss Celebration

St. Tammany Parish, all-day

Celebrate Dr. Seuss's birthday with crafts, snacks, and many fantastical tales

 

Opening Reception: "Waltzing the Muse"

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 6PM

Ogden's newest exhibition is a Jmes Michalopoulos retrospective

 

New Orleans Jazz Vipers

The Maison, 6:30PM

Local trad jazz standard bearers

 

Pelicans vs. Detroit Pistons

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and Pistons go head to head

 

Tin Men

d.b.a., 7PM

The world's premiere washboard-sousaphone-guitar trio

 

New Orleans Community Printshop and Darkroom

Community Print Shop, 7:30PM

Volunteer and members monthly meeting, get involved! 

 

Aurora Nealand & Tom McDermott

Chickie Wah Wah, 8PM

Nealand and McDermott have a fresh take on traditional jazz

 

Delfeayo Marsalis & The Uptown Jazz Orchestra 

Snug Harbor, 8PM & 10PM

Traditional riff and blues sounds

 

Ash Wednesday Singer-Songwriter Showcase

Siberia, 8PM

Featuring Sam Doores, Alex McMurray, Julie Odell, and more

 

Niagara & The Asphalt Jungle

Bar Redux, 9PM

Free screening of two films noir featuring a young Marilyn Monroe

 

Chris & Tami

The New Movement, 9:30PM

Weekly improv from Chris Trew and Tami Nelson

 

Walter "Wolfman" Washington

d.b.a., 10PM

Fiery blues on Frenchmen every week


Consent Decree Brings 500 Reforms, Controversy in NOPD



 

After a year of negotiations, the City and the U.S. Department of Justice are looking to finalize the consent decree that will serve as a blueprint for nearly 500 federally-mandated reforms in the New Orleans Police Department. But the voluminous document has yet to be approved by a judge, and a few organizations representing police officers and the public are vying to get a seat at the table before the hammer comes down. 

 

Last week, two police unions a citizens' group and the city's independent police oversight office filed motions to intervene in the decree, indicating that there could be more parties involved in the reforms than just the federal government and the city. 

 

The four parties looking to intervene, which include the city's Independent Police Monitor, all feel they were left out of the consent decree negotiations. Whether on the side of officers or the public, their court filings all indicate they believe the consent decree does not speak to their position, and raise questions about the ultimate effectiveness of the decree. 

 

Parties typically bring intervention because they don't feel like the city or feds are representing them, and they want their voices to be heard throughout the reforms. 

 

"Unless you're a party to a lawsuit, you can't participate in the lawsuits, you can't stand up and be heard," said Loyola University law professor Dana Ciolino. 

 

On Monday, the Fraternal Order of Police - which represents about 90 percent of the NOPD's officers--filed their motion, claiming that their lack of voice in the proceedings so far means the interests of rank-and-file cops are not protected by the reform document. 

 

Though they participated in an initial meeting about the document, the FOP claims they were shut out of the negotiations. Following the outing of Assistant U.S. Attorney Sal Perricone as nola.com commenter Henry L. Mencken 1951, they petitioned Mayor Mitch Landrieu to be involved in the process citing leaks about the process that were attributed to Perricone and general "anxiety." They never heard back.

 

So, they came to court to seek a seat at the table that was never granted to them.

 

"...None of the members of the NOPD were given any voice in its contents, how it was to be worded, the areas to be covered or, in fact, any part of the proposed Consent Decree whatsoever.  It is a document which will control their jobs yet they have been given no right to have any part in what it says or how it will be implemented," the FOP's court filing says.

 

The FOP argues "they must be allowed to protect their interests. No one else in this litigation will." In the filing, the FOP intones that some of the decree - which is heavy on governing the nitty gritty of police work - goes too far.

 

"Of course, Intervenors do not condone illegal or unconstitutional acts. However, this Consent Decree encompasses more than what may be required to address such allegations and puts restrictions in place that go far beyond remedying alleged unconstitutional or illegal activities," the filing states.

 

The Police Association of New Orleans, another group that represents officers, also filed a motion last week. PANO, which recently released a survey of the rank-and-file that showed officers weren't happy in their jobs (and also had its methods disupted by NOPD brass), also thought they would be included in negotiations. The feds even used the PANO offices to interview rank-and-file cops, the filing says.

 

"It is interesting to note that many of these issues identified by officers, and subsequently targeted by the consent decree, are issues which uniquely affect the ability and effectiveness of the law enforcement officer and his performance. Some of these issues, made public by the March 2011 investigative report, have still been ignored by the defendant...for the past 16 months," the filing states.

 

PANO wants a seat at the table to make sure the City addresses the issues that matter to officers, the filing states.

 

On the other end of the spectrum is Communities United for Change. The group, which works with victims of police brutality and filed its own "Citizens' Consent Decree" recently, filed a motion to intervene that argues the police department cannot be trusted to reform itself.

 

The police department needs civilian oversight before it will ever truly reform, the document says.

 

"Unfortunately, the proposed Consent Decree is deficient in several areas especially as regards to civilian oversight of the police department. CUC does not believe the necessary reforms will come from the existing or proposed structure where the trigger  mechanism for early warning of deprivation of rights is isolated to an “in-house” process that  permits the prevailing conditions outlined in the DOJ report to continue," the filing says.

 

The "early warning" system is a proposal in the consent decree that tracks officer behavior, and is designed to show signs of potential police malfeasance. The CUC said they submitted earlier demands for a civilian oversight committee of the Department, which would provide a way for the public to report and oversee officer conduct, among other items.

 

One example that the CUC uses is the use of force. The filing argues that when police must resort to violence, it should not be investigated internally by the NOPD.

 

"It only adds layers of NOPD investigation to the present  system which has not sustained a charge of homicide against a NOPD officer in over a decade. CUC believes that the investigation of use of force complaints must come from an independent  investigation body," the filing says.

 

The civilian monitor paid by the City would tend to agree. Independent Police Monitor Susan Hutson already has an office and a mandate from voters, but she says she was also left out of the consent decree proceedings.

 

Under the decree, a monitor would be chosen to oversee the reforms for the court. After the consent decree was announced, Hutson - whose position was created after a referendum in 2008 - released a statement saying she was left out of the negotiation process, and that she did not understand her role in the consent decree - even though she was mentioned in it.

 

The filing states Hutson's office reached out to the mayor's office on "at least 7" occasions to discuss the role of the Independent Police Monitor.

 

Under the consent decree, Hutson's office argues it could be "barred" from acting out its duties to the public if the office does not have a seat at the table.

 

However, the Consent Decree, which the OIPM was never allowed to review, takes into account very little of the input provided by the OIPM, yet purports to bind the OIPM to its terms and conditions," the filing states.

 

In a statement, Hutson said local oversight of the department would be critical.

 

"New Orleans is not a city where effective monitoring can occur without local intervention,”  Hutson said in a statement.

 

Ciolino - the Loyola law professor - said the parties will likely be allowed to intervene in the case. But where the parties go from there remains questionable, he said. The binding nature of a consent decree, where the two parties agree to carry out the specific reforms line-by-line - makes further opposition from the parties without objecting to the consent decree more difficult, Ciolino said.

 

"Odds are at the end of the day that they're not going to have much effect on the outcome," he said of the interveners.

 

A City of New Orleans spokesman denied to comment for this article.

 

Oral arguments in the case are scheduled for August 20.





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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

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Photographers

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Art Director:

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Editor:

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Stephen Babcock