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THE

Defender Picks

 

DIMANCHE

June 25th

THINK DEEP

The Drifter, 12PM

Ft. Javier Drada, Tristan Dufrene, Otto

 

The Tangiers Combo

Bacchanal, 12PM

A mid-afternoon match made in heaven

 

Gentilly Stompers

Bamboulas, 1PM

Get jazzy with it

 

Book Signing

Garden District Book Shop, 2PM

Tanisha Jones, Mark of The Fallen

 

Miami Ice

Black Penny, 3PM

Krewe of Goddesses host a popsicle party

 

Grill Out with Your Gills Out

Bayou St. John, 3PM

Krewe of Mermoux Benefit BBQ for NOAGE

 

Moonshine Taste

Three Keys, 7PM

A POC cabaret series at the Ace

 

Guy Fieri’s Rockin Road Show

Tip's, 8PM

Feat. Cowboy Mouth

 

Unfortunate Side Effect

Banks St. Bar, 8PM

Plus Voodoo Wagon and Bad Mimosas

 

Girls Night Out

Rare Form NOLA, 9PM

A rare male revue show

Lundi

June 26th

Pizza For Pitbulls

Reginelli’s, 11AM

Eat pizza to help dogs, really. Benefitting the Love A Pitbull Foundation

 

Justin Molaison

Chickie Wah Wah, 5:30PM

Happy hour tunes

 

Let’s Get Quizzical

Port Orleans Brewing Co., 6:30PM

Food, drinks, trivia

 

Salves + Infused Oils Workshop

Rosalie Apothecary, 7PM

Last class of the Heart of Herbal Medicine Series 

 

Choral Festival

St. Louis Cathedral, 7:30PM

Presented by the N.O. Children’s Choir

 

Breathe LOVE Yoga

Revolution Fitness, 7:30PM

Hatha Yoga Basics

 

Little Tybee + Cliff Hines + Friends

Hi Ho, 8PM

Elements of folk, jazz, psych, and bossa

 

Mondays with Tasche

Mags, 8PM

Vintage soul and modern blues

 

Charlie Gabriel & Friends

Preservation Hall, 8PM

Joined by Taslimah P. Bey, Djallo Djakate, Marion Hayden

 

A Motown Monday

Circle Bar, 9:30PM

With DJ Shane Love

 

Monday Music Therapy

Lucky’s, 10PM

With CSE & Natasha Sanchez

 

MARDI

June 27th

Movie Screening

Broad Theater, 5:30PM

An intimate screening of America Divided

 

Book Signing

Garden District Book Shop, 6PM

Appearences by Courtney + J.P. Sloan

 

Movie Screening

Café Istanbul, 6:30PM

Trapped: A story of women + healthcare

 

Song Writer Sessions

Foundation Room, 7PM

Supporting NOLA’s songwriting community

 

MORBID ANGEL + Suffocation

House of Blues, 7PM

With support by Withered

 

Astrology | Transits

School for Esoteric Arts, 7PM

A lecture on reading transits in natal charts

 

Boston

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

Get ready for a giant sing along

 

Blato Zlato + Toonces

Siberia, 8PM

Balkan tunes + art-rock

 

Progression

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Static Masks, Shame, Annette Peacock Tribute

 

MERCREDI

June 28th

Noontime Talk

NOMA, 12PM

Jim Steg: New Work, with Curator Russell Lord

 

Books Beer & Bookworm Babble

Urban South Brewery, 5PM

A fundraiser for Friends of New Orleans

 

Local Intro to Oils

Monkey Monkey, 6PM

Get the 411 on essential oils

 

Rye Tasting

Grande Krewe, 6PM

A flight of rye

 

Stick To Your Guns

Republic, 6PM

With support by Hawthorne Heights

 

Free Yogalates

The Mint, 6:30PM

Part of Wine Down Wednesdays

 

WNOE Summer Jam

House of Blues, 7PM

Jerrod Neimann with Michael Ray and more

 

Comedy Gold

House of Blues, 7PM

Stand up comedy from the Big Easy

 

Corks & Colors

NOLA Yoga Loft, 7:30PM

Let the paints and wine flow

 

Weird Wednesday’s

Bar Redux, 9PM

The Extra Terrestrial Edition

 

Mighty Brother

Saturn Bar, 10PM

With Grace Pettis

JEUDI

June 29th

Essence Festival

Superdome, 10AM

All your favorites in one place

 

Talkin’ Jazz

Jazz Museum, 2PM

With Tom Saunders

 

Ogden After Hours

The Ogden, 6PM

Featuring Andrew Duhon

 

Movie Screening

Carver Theater, 6PM

FunkJazz Kafé: Diary Of A Decade 

 

Bleed On

Glitter Box, 6PM

Fundraising for We Are #HappyPeriod, powered by Refinery29

 

Book Signing

TREO, 7PM

SHOT by Kathy Shorr

 

BYO #Scored

Music Box Village, 730

Presenting “Where I’m From”

 

JD Hill & The Jammers

Bar Redux, 8PM

Get ready to jam

 

Henry & The Invisibles

Hi Ho, 9PM

With support by Noisewater

 

Soundbytes Fest Edition

Three Keys, 9PM

With PJ Morton + Friends

 

Trance Farmers

Dragon’s Den, 10PM

Support by Yung vul

 

Push Push

Banks St Bar, 10PM

With Rathbone + Raspy

 

VENDREDI

June 30th

Electric Girls Demo Day

Monroe Hall at Loyola, 1:30PM

Check out the newest inventions

 

Field to Table Time

NOPL Youth Services, 2PM

Learn how growing + cooking = saving the world

 

Dinner & A ZOOvie

Audubon Park, 6PM

A showing of Trolls

 

Movie Night in The Garden

Hollygrove Market, 7PM

A showing of Sister Act

 

Songwriter Night

Mags, 9PM

Ft. Shannon Jae, Una Walkenhorst, Rory Sullivan

 

Alligator ChompChomp

The Circle Bar, 9:30PM

Ft. DJ Pasta and Matty N Mitch

 

Free Music Friday

Fulton Ally, 10PM

Featuring DJ Chris Jones

 

Spektrum

Techno Club, 10PM

Ft. CHKLTE + residents

 

The Longitude Event

Café Istanbul, 10PM

Presented by Urban Push Movement

 

Foundation Free Fridays

Tips, 10PM

Ft. Maggie Koerner & Travers Geoffray + Cha Wa

 

Gimme A Reason

Poor Boys Bar, 11PM

Ft. Tristan Dufrene + Bouffant Bouffant

 

SAMEDI

July 1st

SLOSHBALL

The Fly, 12PM

Hosted by Prytania Bar

 

Organic Bug Management

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Learn about pests + organic management

 

Mystic Market

Rare Form NOLA, 2PM

Author talk, live music, art and more

 

Girls Rock New Orleans

Primary-Colton, 2:30PM

The official camper showcase

 

Serious Thing A Go Happen

Ace Hotel, 4PM

Exhibit viewing, artist talk, and after-sounds

 

Art NO(w)

Claire Elizabeth Gallery, 5PM

An eye popping opening reception

 

Antoine Diel Trio

Three Muses, 6PM

With Josh Paxton + Scott Johnson

 

CAIN Ressurection

Southport Music Hall, 9PM

Support by Overtone plus Akadia

 

Grits & Biscuits

House of Blues, 10PM

A Dirty South set

 

Jason Neville Band

BMC, 11PM

With Friends for Essence Fest

DIMANCHE

July 2nd

The Greatest Show On Earth

Prytania Theater, 10AM

Dramatic lives within a circus

 

THINK DEEP

The Drifter Hotel, 2PM

Ft. RYE, Lleauna, Tristen Dufrane

 

Night Market

Secondline Arts, 6PM

With Erica Lee

 

The Story of Stories

Académie Gnostique, 7PM

Learn about the practical magic of fairy tales

 

Silencio

One Eyed Jacks, 8PM

A tribute to David Lynch

 

Alex Bosworth

Bar Redux, 9PM

With Diako Diakoff

 

Church*

The Dragons’s Den, 10PM

SHANOOK, RUS, KIDD LOVE, ZANDER

 

International Flag Party

Howlin Wolf, 11:30PM

The hottest dance party of the year

 

New Creations Brass Band

Maple Leaf, 12AM

A special closing performance

 

Consent Decree Brings 500 Reforms, Controversy in NOPD



 

After a year of negotiations, the City and the U.S. Department of Justice are looking to finalize the consent decree that will serve as a blueprint for nearly 500 federally-mandated reforms in the New Orleans Police Department. But the voluminous document has yet to be approved by a judge, and a few organizations representing police officers and the public are vying to get a seat at the table before the hammer comes down. 

 

Last week, two police unions a citizens' group and the city's independent police oversight office filed motions to intervene in the decree, indicating that there could be more parties involved in the reforms than just the federal government and the city. 

 

The four parties looking to intervene, which include the city's Independent Police Monitor, all feel they were left out of the consent decree negotiations. Whether on the side of officers or the public, their court filings all indicate they believe the consent decree does not speak to their position, and raise questions about the ultimate effectiveness of the decree. 

 

Parties typically bring intervention because they don't feel like the city or feds are representing them, and they want their voices to be heard throughout the reforms. 

 

"Unless you're a party to a lawsuit, you can't participate in the lawsuits, you can't stand up and be heard," said Loyola University law professor Dana Ciolino. 

 

On Monday, the Fraternal Order of Police - which represents about 90 percent of the NOPD's officers--filed their motion, claiming that their lack of voice in the proceedings so far means the interests of rank-and-file cops are not protected by the reform document. 

 

Though they participated in an initial meeting about the document, the FOP claims they were shut out of the negotiations. Following the outing of Assistant U.S. Attorney Sal Perricone as nola.com commenter Henry L. Mencken 1951, they petitioned Mayor Mitch Landrieu to be involved in the process citing leaks about the process that were attributed to Perricone and general "anxiety." They never heard back.

 

So, they came to court to seek a seat at the table that was never granted to them.

 

"...None of the members of the NOPD were given any voice in its contents, how it was to be worded, the areas to be covered or, in fact, any part of the proposed Consent Decree whatsoever.  It is a document which will control their jobs yet they have been given no right to have any part in what it says or how it will be implemented," the FOP's court filing says.

 

The FOP argues "they must be allowed to protect their interests. No one else in this litigation will." In the filing, the FOP intones that some of the decree - which is heavy on governing the nitty gritty of police work - goes too far.

 

"Of course, Intervenors do not condone illegal or unconstitutional acts. However, this Consent Decree encompasses more than what may be required to address such allegations and puts restrictions in place that go far beyond remedying alleged unconstitutional or illegal activities," the filing states.

 

The Police Association of New Orleans, another group that represents officers, also filed a motion last week. PANO, which recently released a survey of the rank-and-file that showed officers weren't happy in their jobs (and also had its methods disupted by NOPD brass), also thought they would be included in negotiations. The feds even used the PANO offices to interview rank-and-file cops, the filing says.

 

"It is interesting to note that many of these issues identified by officers, and subsequently targeted by the consent decree, are issues which uniquely affect the ability and effectiveness of the law enforcement officer and his performance. Some of these issues, made public by the March 2011 investigative report, have still been ignored by the defendant...for the past 16 months," the filing states.

 

PANO wants a seat at the table to make sure the City addresses the issues that matter to officers, the filing states.

 

On the other end of the spectrum is Communities United for Change. The group, which works with victims of police brutality and filed its own "Citizens' Consent Decree" recently, filed a motion to intervene that argues the police department cannot be trusted to reform itself.

 

The police department needs civilian oversight before it will ever truly reform, the document says.

 

"Unfortunately, the proposed Consent Decree is deficient in several areas especially as regards to civilian oversight of the police department. CUC does not believe the necessary reforms will come from the existing or proposed structure where the trigger  mechanism for early warning of deprivation of rights is isolated to an “in-house” process that  permits the prevailing conditions outlined in the DOJ report to continue," the filing says.

 

The "early warning" system is a proposal in the consent decree that tracks officer behavior, and is designed to show signs of potential police malfeasance. The CUC said they submitted earlier demands for a civilian oversight committee of the Department, which would provide a way for the public to report and oversee officer conduct, among other items.

 

One example that the CUC uses is the use of force. The filing argues that when police must resort to violence, it should not be investigated internally by the NOPD.

 

"It only adds layers of NOPD investigation to the present  system which has not sustained a charge of homicide against a NOPD officer in over a decade. CUC believes that the investigation of use of force complaints must come from an independent  investigation body," the filing says.

 

The civilian monitor paid by the City would tend to agree. Independent Police Monitor Susan Hutson already has an office and a mandate from voters, but she says she was also left out of the consent decree proceedings.

 

Under the decree, a monitor would be chosen to oversee the reforms for the court. After the consent decree was announced, Hutson - whose position was created after a referendum in 2008 - released a statement saying she was left out of the negotiation process, and that she did not understand her role in the consent decree - even though she was mentioned in it.

 

The filing states Hutson's office reached out to the mayor's office on "at least 7" occasions to discuss the role of the Independent Police Monitor.

 

Under the consent decree, Hutson's office argues it could be "barred" from acting out its duties to the public if the office does not have a seat at the table.

 

However, the Consent Decree, which the OIPM was never allowed to review, takes into account very little of the input provided by the OIPM, yet purports to bind the OIPM to its terms and conditions," the filing states.

 

In a statement, Hutson said local oversight of the department would be critical.

 

"New Orleans is not a city where effective monitoring can occur without local intervention,”  Hutson said in a statement.

 

Ciolino - the Loyola law professor - said the parties will likely be allowed to intervene in the case. But where the parties go from there remains questionable, he said. The binding nature of a consent decree, where the two parties agree to carry out the specific reforms line-by-line - makes further opposition from the parties without objecting to the consent decree more difficult, Ciolino said.

 

"Odds are at the end of the day that they're not going to have much effect on the outcome," he said of the interveners.

 

A City of New Orleans spokesman denied to comment for this article.

 

Oral arguments in the case are scheduled for August 20.





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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

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Editor

Alexis Manrodt

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Linzi Falk

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