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THE

Defender Picks

 

mardi

September 1st

Hello Nomad 

Chickie Wah Wah, 9p.m.

New Orleans rock show also ft. Yard Dogs and Paper Bison

 

Open Ears Music Series

Blue Nile, 10:30p.m.

This week ft. Prone to Fits

 

Geeks Who Drink

Freret St. Publiq House, 7:30p.m.

Grab a beer and a Scantron, it’s time for trivia

 

Sarah Lessire

Circle Bar, 10p.m.

Classically-trained Belgian singer-songwriter

 

 

ZZ Ward

HOB, 6:30p.m. 

Traveling in support her new album, ‘This Means War’

 

In The Den: Comedy Beast

Howlin’ Wolf, 8:30p.m.

Grab a drink and catch some free comedy

mercredi

September 2nd

Gentleman’s Agreement

Prytania, 10a.m.

Gregory Peck stars as a journalist 

 

Culture Collision

US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center, 5:30p.m.

65 of New Orlean’s visual and performing arts organizations culturally colliding

 

The Fritz

Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.

Funk rock from Asheville

 

Hill Country Hounds

Maple Leaf Bar, 9p.m.

Country rock hailing from the mountains of the USA

 

Hazy Ray

Howlin’ Wolf, 8:30p.m.

Funk-rock with a New Orleans twist

 

Major Bacon

Banks St. Bar, 10p.m.

Grammy-nominated jazz and free BLTs

jeudi

September 3rd

Earth

OEJ, 7p.m.

Rock/metal from Olympia, Washington

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden, 6p.m.

This week ft. Chase Gassaway

 

EDEN

Contemporary Arts Center, 7p.m. 

Film screening explores the life a Parisian musician after the peak of his musical career

 

Bayou International Reggae Night 

Blue Nile, 11p.m.

Reggae spun by DJ T

 

Brass-A-Holics

Freret St. Publiq House, 9:30p.m.

The classic Nola crew rocks Freret

 

Thursdays at Twilight

City Park, 6p.m.

This week ft. Joe Krown Swing Band

vendredi

September 4th

Mötley Crüe

Smoothie King Center, 8p.m.

The heavy metal band’s final tour

 

Louisiana Seafood Festival 

City Park Festival Grounds, 11a.m.

Celebration of the state’s seafood and music

 

Saints vs. Packers

Lambeau Field, 6p.m.

Last preseason game

 

 

Friday Nights at NOMA

NOMA, 5p.m.

Arts and Letters with Thomas Beller

 

Foundation Free Fridays

Tip’s, 9p.m.

Free evening of music this week ft. Flow Tribe and Stoop Kids

 

futureBased + Carneyval

Republic, 10p.m. 

Get your electronic fix

samedi

September 5th

Super Fresh Hip Hop Fest

Lakefront Arean, 8p.m.

Salt N Pepa, Slick Rick and others take Nola

 

Louisiana Seafood Festival 

City Park Festival Grounds, 11a.m.

Celebration of the state’s seafood and music

 

Disorientation

Howlin’ Wolf, 9:30p.m.

Naughty Professor + Elysian Feel and more

 

 

Bourbon Street Extravaganza

Bourbon and St. Ann Streets, 6p.m.

Free outdoor concert as part of Southern Decadence

 

Crescent City Farmer’s Market

700 Magazine St., 8a.m.-12p.m.

Downtown edition of the city's prime local market

dimanche

September 6th

Louisiana Seafood Festival 

City Park Festival Grounds, 11a.m.

Last day to grab some seafood and catch some jams

 

Mistress America

Prytania, 12p.m.;2p.m.;4p.m.;6p.m.;8p.m.;10p.m.

A college freshman is seduced by her step-sister’s mad schemes

 

What So Not

Republic, 9p.m.

Australian electronic music project

 

September Open Mic & Slam

Old Marquer Theater, 6:30p.m.

Monthly slam and fundraiser 

 

Southern Decadence Walking Parade

Golden Lantern, 2p.m.

Pride and parades


Clybourne Park

'Straightforward Conversational Drama' Explores One Area's Gentrification Through 50 Years



This Friday, Cripple Creek Theatre Company opens the Pulitzer-prize winning Clybourne Park at the Shadowbox Theatre.  Written by Bruce Norris, the play focuses on racial and social changes within one neighborhood at two socially and culturally distinct times, 1959 and 2009. 

 

The first act illustrates one white community's reluctance to accept a new black family, even of the same class.  The second act explores issues of gentrification, as the neighborhood has fallen into disrepair and matches ideals for the rich and "good investment" seekers.  An interview with Artistic Director and Company Co-Founder Andy Vaught gives insight to the play and its relevance to New Orleans' own social dynamics.

 

A departure from Cripple Creek's borderline-norm of more absurdist plays from authors such as Thornton Wilder, Alfred Jarry, and even Mr. Vaught himself, Clybourne Park touts a straightforward conversational drama with a singular location, thus "getting back to the roots of Cripple Creek."  However, for members of the company, this does not make the play any less compelling or less worthwhile to produce.

 

Vaught finds Norris' work nihilistic, or, upon quick second consideration, "maybe he's just a realist."  In line with Cripple Creek's mission to "engage our community with immediate, relevant plays," Clybourne Park reflects upon race relations, and considers place and memory as the bases of a strong community.  Immediately relevant to current New Orleans social dynamics--evident even on the same St. Claude block as the Shadowbox Theatre--the play confronts the audience with questions of neighborhood and entitlement.  Specifically, Cripple Creek bills that the play explores middle class hypocrisies, a phrase Vaught describes as a "lack of understanding about the struggle that others have to go through, their history, to get where they are… [as some allow] their present financial situation allows them to distract them [from others]."

 

Not to be hypocrites themselves, Cripple Creek partnered last fall with the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center (GNOFHAC) for the creation of the play. In fact, the production opening this weekend is the last in a series of three events of "The Clybourne @ St. Claude Project."

 

If you missed it, there was a physical workshop exploring the question: "what does 'home' mean to you?" as well as a staged reading of a new play examining "the impact of exclusionary housing policy and practices on women and families."

 

While this intense community activism fulfills the company's second mission, "to provide our community with a platform for constructive dialogue, transformative reflection, and social change," they do not stop there.  After every Saturday performance of Clybourne Park's six-week run, dramaturg Rachel Lee will lead a Post-Show Reflection with rotating speakers such as C.W. Canon, journalist (6/1) and Karen Gadbois, reporter and blogger (6/8), among others.  The lobby will also be transformed with relevant artwork from GNOFAC and Women's Health and Justice Initiative, as well as comparisons of institutional racism in housing policies in New Orleans and Chicago.

 

As the company looks forward to the theatrical success and sprouts of community dialogue to come from Clybourne Park, they are proud to be closing their seventh year.  In reflection, Vaught intimates that past productions have taken audience members to "the Acropolis of Ancient Greece, a gateway to Hell, and a small Norwegian town."  But to craft the minute details of what makes a house a home, and what makes a community vibrant, Vaught states "that's, well…" and holds a pause that leads to a shrug and a laugh to imply that that's damn difficult.

 

'Clybourne Park' premieres May 17, and is running Fridays-Sundays until June 23. More information here.

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Theatre Critic

Michael Martin

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock