Search
| Clear, 82 F (28 C)
| RSS | |

SECTIONS:

 

Arts · Politics · Crime
· Sports · Food ·
· Opinion · NOLA ·
Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

Vendredi

July 21st

Friday Pop Up

Drifter Hotel, 1PM

By Lucille’s Roti Shop

 

Louisiana Sportsman Show

Superdome, 3PM

Back in NOLA after 12 years

 

Dinner and a ZOOvie

Audubon Park, 6PM

A showing of Moana

 

Summer Nerd Movie Nights

Tubby & Coo’s, 7PM

A showing of The Neverending Story

 

John Waters Film Festival

NOMA, 7PM

A showing of Pink Flamingos

 

Leonardo Hernandez Trio

Casa Borrega, 7PM

Great food, great music

 

Comedy F#@k Yeah

The Dragon’s Den, 8PM

Ft. Shane Torres

 

New Rebel Family

House of Blues, 8PM

Ft. AYO, The Other LA, Akadia, and Ventruss

 

Mia Borders Trio

Foundation Room, 9:30PM

Open to the public

 

Alligator ChompChomp

The Circle Bar, 10PM

Crunchin’ on those notes

 

Foundation Free Fridays

Tips, 10PM

Ft. Walter “Wolfman” Washington + The Fortifiers

 

Spektrum Fridays

Techno Club, 11PM

Ft. Mikel Douglas + Dozal

SAMEDI

July 22nd

Ice Cream Social

Longue Vue, 10AM

Plus adoptable pets from the SPCA

 

Veggie Growing Basics

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Grow your own food

 

National Hot Dog Day

Dat Dog, 3PM

Raffles, ice cream and more

 

Cocktails and Queens

Piscobar, 6PM

A queer industry dance party

 

Immersive Sound Bath

Nola Yoga Loft, 7PM

Soothing 3D Soundscapes

 

Paul Mooney

Jazz Market, 8PM

Also ft. music by Caren Green

 

New Orleans Beatles Festival

House of Blues, 8PM

Come together, right now

 

Christmas in July

The Willow, 8PM

Ugly sweaters and peppermint shots

 

HOUxNOLA

Three Keys, 9PM

With Coolasty ft. Jack Freeman and more

 

Particle Devotion

Banks St Bar, 9PM

Ft. Paper Bison +  Tranche

 

Cesar Comanche

Art Klub, 9:30PM

Ft. Ghost Dog, Knox Ketchum and more

 

Gimme A Reason

Poor Boy’s Bar, 10PM

Ft. Savile and local support

 

Techno Club

Techno Club, 10PM

Ft. Javier Drada, Eria Lauren, Otto

 

DIMANCHE

July 23rd

From Here to Eternity

Prytania Theatre, 10AM

The 1953 classic

 

Eight Flavors

Longue Vue, 12PM

Sarah Lohman will discuss her new book

 

Book Swap

Church Alley Coffee Bar, 12PM

Bring books, get books

 

Urban Composting

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Learn about easy composting

 

Brave New World Book Club

Tubby & Coo’s, 2PM

Open to all

 

Gentleman Loser

The Drifter Hotel, 3PM

A classic poolside rager

 

Mixology 101

Carrolton Market

With Dusty Mars

 

Freret Street Block Party

Freret St, 5PM

A celebratory bar crawl

 

Mushroom Head

Southport Music Hall, 6PM

+ Hail Sagan and American Grim

 

Glen David Andrews

Little Gem Saloon, 8PM

Get trombone’d by the greatest

 

Hot 8 Brass Band

The Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Brass music for a new era

 

Church*

The Dragon’s Den, 10PM

Ft. KTRL, Unicorn Fukr, RMonic


Clybourne Park

'Straightforward Conversational Drama' Explores One Area's Gentrification Through 50 Years



This Friday, Cripple Creek Theatre Company opens the Pulitzer-prize winning Clybourne Park at the Shadowbox Theatre.  Written by Bruce Norris, the play focuses on racial and social changes within one neighborhood at two socially and culturally distinct times, 1959 and 2009. 

 

The first act illustrates one white community's reluctance to accept a new black family, even of the same class.  The second act explores issues of gentrification, as the neighborhood has fallen into disrepair and matches ideals for the rich and "good investment" seekers.  An interview with Artistic Director and Company Co-Founder Andy Vaught gives insight to the play and its relevance to New Orleans' own social dynamics.

 

A departure from Cripple Creek's borderline-norm of more absurdist plays from authors such as Thornton Wilder, Alfred Jarry, and even Mr. Vaught himself, Clybourne Park touts a straightforward conversational drama with a singular location, thus "getting back to the roots of Cripple Creek."  However, for members of the company, this does not make the play any less compelling or less worthwhile to produce.

 

Vaught finds Norris' work nihilistic, or, upon quick second consideration, "maybe he's just a realist."  In line with Cripple Creek's mission to "engage our community with immediate, relevant plays," Clybourne Park reflects upon race relations, and considers place and memory as the bases of a strong community.  Immediately relevant to current New Orleans social dynamics--evident even on the same St. Claude block as the Shadowbox Theatre--the play confronts the audience with questions of neighborhood and entitlement.  Specifically, Cripple Creek bills that the play explores middle class hypocrisies, a phrase Vaught describes as a "lack of understanding about the struggle that others have to go through, their history, to get where they are… [as some allow] their present financial situation allows them to distract them [from others]."

 

Not to be hypocrites themselves, Cripple Creek partnered last fall with the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center (GNOFHAC) for the creation of the play. In fact, the production opening this weekend is the last in a series of three events of "The Clybourne @ St. Claude Project."

 

If you missed it, there was a physical workshop exploring the question: "what does 'home' mean to you?" as well as a staged reading of a new play examining "the impact of exclusionary housing policy and practices on women and families."

 

While this intense community activism fulfills the company's second mission, "to provide our community with a platform for constructive dialogue, transformative reflection, and social change," they do not stop there.  After every Saturday performance of Clybourne Park's six-week run, dramaturg Rachel Lee will lead a Post-Show Reflection with rotating speakers such as C.W. Canon, journalist (6/1) and Karen Gadbois, reporter and blogger (6/8), among others.  The lobby will also be transformed with relevant artwork from GNOFAC and Women's Health and Justice Initiative, as well as comparisons of institutional racism in housing policies in New Orleans and Chicago.

 

As the company looks forward to the theatrical success and sprouts of community dialogue to come from Clybourne Park, they are proud to be closing their seventh year.  In reflection, Vaught intimates that past productions have taken audience members to "the Acropolis of Ancient Greece, a gateway to Hell, and a small Norwegian town."  But to craft the minute details of what makes a house a home, and what makes a community vibrant, Vaught states "that's, well…" and holds a pause that leads to a shrug and a laugh to imply that that's damn difficult.

 

'Clybourne Park' premieres May 17, and is running Fridays-Sundays until June 23. More information here.

view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
Advertise With Us Here
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
Follow Us on Twitter
view counter


Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily