Search
| ,
| RSS | |

SECTIONS:

 

Arts · Politics · Crime
· Sports · Food ·
· Opinion · NOLA ·
Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

March 28th

Book Reading: Elizabeth Pearce

Garden District Book Shop, 6PM

From her new book "Drink Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Best Cocktail Bars, Dives, & Speakeasies"

 

Spring Publishing Camp

Tubby & Coo's Mid-City Book Shop, 7PM

Book publishing workshop

 

Gabby Douglas

Dillrd University, 7PM

Olympic gymnast talks fame and fitness

 

Laelume

The Carver, 7PM

World soul jazz music

 

Laughter Without Borders

Loyola University, 7PM

Clowns for a cause, to benefit Syrian refugees

 

Tuesday Night Haircuts

St. Roch Tavern, 8PM

Tonight: beer, haircuts, karaoke

 

Thinkin' With Lincoln 

Bayou Beer Garden, 8PM

Outdoor trivia

 

Water Seed

Blue Nile, 9PM

Interstellar future funk

 

Stanton Moore Trio

Snug Harbor, 10PM

Galactic drummer’s side project - also at 8PM

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


Clybourne Park

'Straightforward Conversational Drama' Explores One Area's Gentrification Through 50 Years



This Friday, Cripple Creek Theatre Company opens the Pulitzer-prize winning Clybourne Park at the Shadowbox Theatre.  Written by Bruce Norris, the play focuses on racial and social changes within one neighborhood at two socially and culturally distinct times, 1959 and 2009. 

 

The first act illustrates one white community's reluctance to accept a new black family, even of the same class.  The second act explores issues of gentrification, as the neighborhood has fallen into disrepair and matches ideals for the rich and "good investment" seekers.  An interview with Artistic Director and Company Co-Founder Andy Vaught gives insight to the play and its relevance to New Orleans' own social dynamics.

 

A departure from Cripple Creek's borderline-norm of more absurdist plays from authors such as Thornton Wilder, Alfred Jarry, and even Mr. Vaught himself, Clybourne Park touts a straightforward conversational drama with a singular location, thus "getting back to the roots of Cripple Creek."  However, for members of the company, this does not make the play any less compelling or less worthwhile to produce.

 

Vaught finds Norris' work nihilistic, or, upon quick second consideration, "maybe he's just a realist."  In line with Cripple Creek's mission to "engage our community with immediate, relevant plays," Clybourne Park reflects upon race relations, and considers place and memory as the bases of a strong community.  Immediately relevant to current New Orleans social dynamics--evident even on the same St. Claude block as the Shadowbox Theatre--the play confronts the audience with questions of neighborhood and entitlement.  Specifically, Cripple Creek bills that the play explores middle class hypocrisies, a phrase Vaught describes as a "lack of understanding about the struggle that others have to go through, their history, to get where they are… [as some allow] their present financial situation allows them to distract them [from others]."

 

Not to be hypocrites themselves, Cripple Creek partnered last fall with the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center (GNOFHAC) for the creation of the play. In fact, the production opening this weekend is the last in a series of three events of "The Clybourne @ St. Claude Project."

 

If you missed it, there was a physical workshop exploring the question: "what does 'home' mean to you?" as well as a staged reading of a new play examining "the impact of exclusionary housing policy and practices on women and families."

 

While this intense community activism fulfills the company's second mission, "to provide our community with a platform for constructive dialogue, transformative reflection, and social change," they do not stop there.  After every Saturday performance of Clybourne Park's six-week run, dramaturg Rachel Lee will lead a Post-Show Reflection with rotating speakers such as C.W. Canon, journalist (6/1) and Karen Gadbois, reporter and blogger (6/8), among others.  The lobby will also be transformed with relevant artwork from GNOFAC and Women's Health and Justice Initiative, as well as comparisons of institutional racism in housing policies in New Orleans and Chicago.

 

As the company looks forward to the theatrical success and sprouts of community dialogue to come from Clybourne Park, they are proud to be closing their seventh year.  In reflection, Vaught intimates that past productions have taken audience members to "the Acropolis of Ancient Greece, a gateway to Hell, and a small Norwegian town."  But to craft the minute details of what makes a house a home, and what makes a community vibrant, Vaught states "that's, well…" and holds a pause that leads to a shrug and a laugh to imply that that's damn difficult.

 

'Clybourne Park' premieres May 17, and is running Fridays-Sundays until June 23. More information here.

view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
Follow Us on Twitter
view counter
Mardi Gras Zone
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter


Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock