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THE

Defender Picks

 

JEUDI

July 31st

Thursdays at Twilight
City Park Botanical Garden, 6p.m.
This week ft. Ole Man River Band ($10)

 

Ogden After Hours
Ogden Museum, 6-8p.m.
This week ft. Ruby and the Rogues ($10)

 

Zephyrs vs. Iowa
Zephyr Stadium, 7p.m.
Local baseball in Metairie

 

Dying City
Shadowbox Theatre, 7:30p.m.
Christopher Shinn’s play about the social effects of the Iraq War ($15)

 

Twelfth Night
Tulane Dixon Hall, 7:30p.m.
Ft. the student actors of the All Things Shakespeare Program

 

Cabaret
Tulane Dixon Hall, 8p.m.
Summer Lyric Theatre presents

 

The Gallery
Southport Hall, 8p.m.
Hooky indie rock out of western Massachusetts ($10)

 

Flesh Lights, Trampoline Team, Fez
Saturn Bar, 9p.m.

Naughty punk rock from Austin & NOLA ($7)

 

Bounce 4 Year Anniversary
Republic, 10p.m.
Ft. Big Freedia, Sissy Nobby & more ($10)

 

Monica McIntyre
Cafe Istanbul, 10p.m.
Cellist celebrates her birthday

 

Reggae Night
Blue Nile, 11p.m.
Hosted by DJ T-Roy

VENDREDI

August 1st

Satchmo Summerfest
Old U.S. Mint, 12-10p.m.
Friday ft. James Andrews, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Wycliffe Gordon, & more

 

Friday Nights at NOMA
NOMA, 5-9p.m.
Gallery talk by Anne Roberts, music by Cristina Perez

 

What Made Milwaukee Famous

Euclid Records, 5p.m.

Preview their Gasa Gasa show tonight—free!

 

French Film Festival
Prytania Theatre, beginning 5:30p.m.
At 5:30, Tom at the Farm; at 7:45, Yves St. Laurent

 

Rolland Golden: Life, Love, and Art in the French Quarter
Garden District Gallery, 6p.m.
Local artist signs new memoir of his life 1955-1976

 

Zephyrs vs. Iowa
Zephyr Stadium, 7p.m.
Local baseball in Metairie

 

Kermit Ruffins & the BBQ Swingers
Blue Nile, 7p.m.
Catch Kermit on Frenchmen

 

Dying City
Shadowbox Theatre, 7:30p.m.
Christopher Shinn’s play about the social effects of the Iraq War ($20)

 

Twelfth Night
Tulane Dixon Hall, 7:30p.m.
Ft. the student actors of the All Things Shakespeare Program

 

Cabaret
Tulane Dixon Hall, 8p.m.
Summer Lyric Theatre presents

 

Sarah McLachlan
Saenger Theater, 8p.m.
Canadian superstar’s new album is Shine On

 

Grieves, Son Real
One Eyed Jacks, 9p.m.
Seattle-based MC ($15)

 

Foundation Free Fridays
Tipitina’s, 10p.m.
This week ft. Iko Allstars

 

What Made Milwaukee Famous
Gasa Gasa, 10p.m.
w/ Breton Sound, A. Sinclair ($7)

SAMEDI

August 2nd

Satchmo Summerfest
Old U.S. Mint, 12-10p.m.
Saturday ft. Glen David Andrews, Brass-A-Holics, Topsy Chapman & more

 

French Film Festival
Prytania Theatre, beginning 12p.m.
At noon, Le Chef; at 1:45, Marius; at 3:45, Mr Leos CaraX; at 5:30, Tom at the Farm

 

White Linen Night
CAC & 300-600 blocks Julia St., beginning 6p.m.
Julia Street art scene’s big night out

 

Zephyrs vs. Nashville
Zephyr Stadium, 6p.m.

Local baseball in Metairie

 

Jesse McCartney
House of Blues, 6:30p.m.
90s teen pop sensation, now sponsored by Twix ($25)

 

Dying City
Shadowbox Theatre, 7:30p.m.
Christopher Shinn’s play about Iraq War's social effects ($20) (final performance)

 

Twelfth Night
Tulane Dixon Hall, 7:30p.m.
Ft. the student actors of the All Things Shakespeare Program

 

Cabaret
Tulane Dixon Hall, 8p.m.
Summer Lyric Theatre presents

 

Hank III
House of Blues, 8p.m.
AKA Shelton Hank Williams, AKA Hank Williams III ($31)

 

Big History Hiatus Show
Tipitina’s, 10p.m.
with Sweet Crude, Vox and the Hound ($10)

 

Ex-Cult, BABES, Giorgio Murderer
Saturn Bar, 10p.m.
Raucous post-rock out of Memphis ($7)

 

HUSTLE!
Hi-Ho Lounge, 11p.m.
DJ Soul Sister’s rare groove dance party

 

Mykki Blanco
One Eyed Jacks, 12a.m.
Queer hip-hop artist & performance artist ($12)
 

DIMANCHE

August 3rd

Satchmo Summerfest
Old U.S. Mint, 12-10p.m.
Sunday features Original Pinettes, Kermit Ruffins, Jeremy Davenport & more

 

French Film Festival
Prytania Theatre, beginning 12p.m.
At noon, A Summer’s Tale; at 2:30, Fanny; at 5, Mood Indigo

 

Twelfth Night
Tulane Dixon Hall, 1:30p.m.
Ft. the student actors of the All Things Shakespeare Program

 

Cabaret
Tulane Dixon Hall, 2p.m.
Summer Lyric Theatre presents

 

Zephyrs vs. Nashville
Zephyr Stadium, 4p.m.
Local baseball in Metairie

 

Justin Timberlake
Smoothie King Center, 8p.m.
Not A Bad Thing ($56+)

 

John Moreland
the BEATnik, 8p.m.
Tulsa, OK singer-songwriter
 


Carrying the Torch

Flambeau Barers Shed Light on Early Mardi Gras Traditions



Between the colorful floats and raucous marching bands, a humbler – yet no less staid – Mardi Gras tradition slips between the cracks in the marching order. Keepers of the light are known to lead the way for those lost in the dark and that is a perfect way to describe a flambeau carrier.

 

 

They carry large, wooden poles with torches backed by stainless steel high above. In the original New Orleans Mardi Gras celebrations, the flambeau

were carried by slaves and free people of color alongside the floats. They
lit the way for the parade before streetlights.

 

Though they had a utilitarian function, the addition of the flambeau also

had a social element: to incorporate blacks in what was considered a white
carnival. The undertones have lead to much debate about continuing the
tradition, even though the way forward is well lit.

 

To many people, the tradition remains important, and helps keep the Mardi

Gras parades authentic. What many people fail to realize is that many
carriers have passed this tradition down for generations. Like many things
that never go out of style, it is also a great way to make some extra
money.

 

Flambeau carriers were never forced to be carriers. They were always paid.

Originally they were paid $1.50. After World War II, the price was raised
to $2.00. Though the carriers were already getting paid 50 cents more than
prewar prices, they wanted to increase the pay to 5.00. This caused a problem for many of the parades. It came to a point that the parades had to have fewer flambeau, and hire white men to carry them.

 

Eventually, the problems was resolved, and the flambeau were back alongside the floats. The pay is much higher these days and carriers can make up to $ 300 or $ 400 from the tips received from paradegoers.

 

“It was a hell of a lot of fun and I always made at least a $100. It was really tiring though,” said Matt ‘Slyfox’ J Thomas, a local New Orleans resident who happened upon being a flambeau carrier. “I never talked to anyone about being a carrier. It’s just something you find out about. I just went to the beginning of the parade route a few hours before the parade started and they gave me a number and a flambeau.”

 

Though Thomas never talked to anyone directly there are people out there who specifically recruit for flambeau carriers. Barry Donahue is a flambeau coordinator for three parades: Chaos, Proteus, and D’etat. Donahue has been a flambeau coordinator for the past 15-20 years and is very opinionated on how the carriers should act in the parades.

 

“New-line krewes have them dancing and twirling the flambeau, and that is the not the main idea. We want to show people what it was like in the 1800s,” states Donahue. “Old- line krewes have the carriers stand beside and light the floats like it was back in the 1800s.”

 

Old-line krewe refers to the original krewes of Mardi Gras, while new-line or super krewes refers to the newer krewes. Not all krewes have flambeaux but they are looking to add them.  Most krewes own their flambeaux but a few rent from the other krewes. Proteus actually uses the original flambeaux in which the burners used are from streetlights.

 

Nowadays, the torches are kept lit by propane, as opposed to kerosene in times gone by. They also are a lot safer and do not drip like the old ones. The flambeaux have injured no carriers or tourist. It used to be the carriers wore white, hooded gowns gowns called Dominos to protect from the flame and catch the soot from the flambeau. Proteus and Chaos have some of their carriers where the domino in white, while Orpheus have their carriers wear red dominos.

 

Even though flambeau carriers started out as slaves and free people of color, it has become more of a mixed tradition. Today, 75 percent of the carriers had previous ancestors who were carriers, and continue the tradition. But anyone can become a carrier. Carriers vary from high school coaches, ROTC members, students, to the unemployed. Some carriers travel from all over the country just to have the honor of carrying a flambeau. People who do it enjoy it because they get to experience Mardi Gras in a different way and be part of something that has been going on for centuries.

 

And even with the parades less than three weeks away, the ranks of flambeau aren't even full yet for this year. Donahue said is still looking for carriers for the parades he manages. Anyone is welcome to meet at the corner of Camp and Julia for Proteus and Chaos around 3 pm and at Jefferson and Magazine at the same time for D’etat.

 

“We want tourists to see and remember where Mardi Gras comes from. One day we will get back to the traditional way of carrying flambeau,”  Donahue said. However, one can say that not only tourists need to see and remember where Mardi Gras comes from. Seeing the parades pass by so many times, native New Orleanians could use a reminder as well.

Are those parades the only

Are those parades the only ones looking for flambeaux, or are there others?

I have witnessed the lighting

I have witnessed the lighting of the lights the flambeau cordnator is not a white man and is a very nice guy

Barry Donahue is a flambeau

Barry Donahue is a flambeau coordinator for three parades: Chaos, Proteus, and D’etat. Donahue has been a flambeau coordinator for the past 15-20 years and is very opinionated on how the carriers should act in the parades.

“New-line krewes have them dancing and twirling the flambeau, and that is the not the main idea. We want to show people what it was like in the 1800s,” states Donahue. “Old- line krewes have the carriers stand beside and light the floats like it was back in the 1800s.”

***

Translation, Mr. Donahue is an uptight white dude who wants black folks to know their place and act as they are told.

I'm sure there are plenty of other ways he would like to show people what life was like in the 1800's.

One last thing, please hand the flambeau money instead of throwing it to them, that is unless black folks scrounging for change is another quaint old timey tradition that needs to be carried on.

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings Editor

Anna Gaca

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Managing Editor

Stephen Babcock

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.