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Defender Picks

 

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


Butterfly Effect

New Orleans Opera's Madame Butterfly: A Review



On Friday, the New Orleans Opera Association kicked off its two-day run of Madame Butterfly, which will conclude the company’s impressive season.

 

Puccini’s tragic opera, which is widely considered to be one of the greatest of its form, provides the NOOA an opportunity to show off its ability to satisfy opera-goers. Bringing together the esteemed Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, impressive stage design, and immensely talented singers, the NOOA’s production of Madame Butterfly is an outstanding achievement.

 

Madame Butterfly is the tragic story of Cio-Cio San, a Japanese woman who abandons her religion and people to marry a U.S. Naval officer and give birth to his child. When he leaves her and returns three years later with an American wife, the truth of her betrayal leads to devastating consequences.

 

Soprano Maria Kanyova shines brightly in the title role, bringing to the stage a powerful voice capable of dramatic intensity and nuance; breathing new energy and life into the complex character of Cio-Cio San (Madame Butterfly). Kanyova’s vocal prowess was present throughout the evening, though demonstrated most compellingly while performing the aria “One Beautiful Day,” which left much of the audience in tears and was met with emphatic applause.

 

Appearing in the role of caddish B.F. Pinkerton is New Orleans native Bryan Hymel, whose forceful, stentorian tenor voice provides a masterful complement to Ms. Kanyova’s plaintive Cio-Cio San. Mr. Hymel’s portrayal of the vile Pinkerton was so convincing that it was difficult not to want to hiss at him when he came out for the curtain call. The audience, instead, jumped to their feet to deliver this talented rising star a standing ovation.

 

Equally noteworthy were the flawless performances of the devoted maid Suzuki, featuring mezzo-soprano Margaret Thompson, and United States consul Sharpless, performed by baritone Jake Gardner. Both brought forth forceful renditions of these characters who watch helplessly as the tragedy unfolds before them. An added treat to the show is the presence of Cio-Cio San’s son, played by Kanyova’s real-life daughter, Kathleen Kania.

 

The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, under the baton of conductor Robert Lyall, provided a magnificent performance of Puccini’s riveting score. There is a reason why Madame Butterfly is one of the most famous and regularly performed operas in mainstream repertoire. The music is as elaborate as the action on stage, turning on a dime from light and sanguine to dark and echoing with despair. While the orchestra blended fluently with the singers on stage, a break in the action between the final two acts provided the LPO with the opportunity to display their abilities unaccompanied. Although the audience appeared to become a bit restless at this point in the opera, the performance added excellent dramatic tension to the image of Cio-Cio San eternally waiting for Pinkerton in vain.

 

Director Tomer Zvulun and NOOA’s production staff created a minimalist set that was well suited for this opera. Consisting of shoji, or Japanese sliding doors, and semitransparent backdrops, the set paralleled the action occurring on stage. Just as Pinkerton callously muscles into the delicate Madame Butterfly’s life, Pinkerton’s presence on stage also comes off as threatening, as though he could easily barge through the paper-thin walls.

 

Similarly impressive is the use of flowers in the second act. When Cio-Cio San and maid Suzuki perform the “Flower Duet,” the singers gleefully toss hundreds of flower petals across the stage. As the aria concludes, a downpour of petals above the curtain flood the stage, producing an indelible image filled with both felicity and foreboding.

 

Madame Butterfly continues with a final performance on Sunday, April 14 at 2:30 pm. Tickets start at $25. For ticket information, visit the New Orleans Opera website or call 504-529-3000.

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Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock