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THE

Defender Picks

 

DIMANCHE

April 30th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds, all day

Final day of weekend one

 

Breakfest

Bayou Beer Garden, 9AM

The most important meal of the year

 

Movie Screening: The Invisible Man

Prytania Theatre, 10AM

1933 sci-fi horror classic

 

Dan TDM

Saenger Theatre, 3PM

YouTube superstar comes to town

 

Sunday Musical Meditation

Marigny Opera House, 5PM

Feat. guitarist and composer David Sigler

 

One Tease to Rule Them All

Eiffel Society, 7PM

Lord of the Rings burlesque

 

Joe Krown Trio

Maple Leaf Bar, 7PM

Feat. Walter "Wolfman" Washington and Russell Batiste, plus a crawfish boil

 

Blato Zlato

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA-based Balkan band

 

What is a Motico? 

Zeitgeist Arts Center, 9PM

Helen Gillet presents Belgian avant garde films

LUNDI

May 1st

May Day Strike and March

Louis Armstrong Park, 1PM

A protest for freedom, jobs, justice, and sanctuary for all

 

Movie Screening: Soundtracks: Songs That Defined History

Peoples Health Jazz Market, 6:30PM

CNN presents event, with post-screening conversation with anchor Brooke Baldwin

 

WWOZ Piano Night

House of Blues, 7PM
Back to the roots

 

Ooh Poo Pah Doo Monday Blues

Carver Club, 8PM

Treme club shifts its weekly show to the historic Carver Theatre

 

Poetry on Poets

Cafe Istanbul, 9:15PM

Evening of poetry with Chuck Perkins, plus live music

 

Brass-A-Holics

Blue Nile, 11PM

Famed brass all-stars play Frenchmen 

 

 

MARDI

May 2nd

Collison

Ernest N. Morial Cenvention Center 

Kick off day of tech conference

 

United Bakery Records Revue

Marigny Recording Studio, 3PM

First annual showcase of the label's artists

 

GiveNOLA Fest

Greater New Orleans Foundation, 4:30PM

Music from Irma Thomas, Big Sam's Funky Nation, Rebirth Brass Band

 

Tasting Tuesdays

343 Baronne St., 6:30PM

Chardonnay vs. Pinot Noir

 

Gojira

House of Blues, 7PM

Grammy-nominated French heavy metal 

 

Little Freddie King

Little Gem Saloon, 7:30PM

Stick around for Honey Island Swamp Band at 11PM

 

Neil Diamond

Smoothie King Center, 8PM

50th anniversary tour

 

The Mike Dillon Band

Siberia, 9PM

Feat. Rory Danger and the Danger Dangers

MERCREDI

May 3rd

Book Reading: Michael Fry

Octavia Books, 4:30PM

From "How to Be A Supervillain" 

 

Flower Crown Workshop

Freda, 6PM

Hosted by Pistil & Stamen Flower Farm and Studio

 

Pete Fountain Tribute

Music at the Mint, 7PM

Feat. Tim Laughlin

 

Erica Falls

The Sanctuary, 8PM

CD release show

 

Piano Summit

Snug Harbor, 8PM

Feat. Marcia Ball, Joe Krown, and Tom McDermott

 

The New Pornographers

Tipitina's, 8PM

In support of newest album 'Whiteout Conditions'

 

Pixies

Saenger Theatre, 8:30PM

Alt-rock icons

 

Piano Sessions Vol. 7

Blue Nile, 9PM

Feat. Ivan Neville

 

Twin Peaks

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Chrome Pony and Post Animal in support

 

New Breed Brass Band

Blue Nile, 11:55PM

Next generation NOLA brass

 

Tribute to Lee Dorsey

Pres Hall, 12AM

With Jon Cleary, Benny Bloom, & Friends

JEUDI

May 4th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds, all day

Weekend two kicks off

 

May the 4th Be With You

Tubby & Coo's, 4PM

Star Wars party

 

Jazz in the Park
Armstrong Park, 4PM

Russell Batiste and friends

 

Yoga Social Club

Crescent Park, 5:45PM

Get sweaty and centered 

 

Cuba to Congo Square Throwdown

Ashé Cac, 6PM

Live music, DJs, and dance

 

Mike Dillon

The Music Box Village, 6:30PM

Punk rock percussion

 

Herbs & Rituals

Rosalie Apothecary, 7PM

Class for women's health

 

Shorty Fest

House of Blues, 7:30PM

Benefit concert for his namesake foundation

 

AllNight Show 

The Historic Carver Theater, 8PM

Feat. Ian Neville, Nikki Glaspie, SSHH feat. Zak Starkey of The Who

 

Jurassic 5

The Howlin Wolf, 9PM

Feat. Blackalicious

 

Foundation of Funk

Republic NOLA, 9PM

Feat. George Porter Jr., Zigaboo Modeliste

 

Jazz: In and Out

Music at the Mint, 9PM

Live music to benefit the Louis Armstrong Jazz Camp


Budget Battle Cry

GOP Treasurer Sideswipes Jindal Over 'Fond Illusion'



When it comes to the state's huge budget hole, John Kennedy isn't pursing his lips.
 
 
Louisiana lawmakers continue to debate and grind out the best ways of balancing the state budget, and State Treasurer John Kennedy released a public statement on the current proposal heading to the State legislature's floor, calling it, "A Fond Illusion."
 
 
Kennedy, a Republican now serving his fourth term as the State's Treasurer, oversees the $10.6 billion of investments held by the State of Louisiana. He is the man responsible for the safe keeping and disbursement of public money. This might be why Kennedy felt compelled to release a statement on March 4, detailing his professional opinion of the Jindal administration's proposed budget. It wasn't good.
 
 
"Call this budget what you like: a fond illusion or smart accounting," Treasurer Kennedy wrote. "The result will be the same: mid-year budget cuts for the sixth year in a row, because the budget is not balanced. Why should we care? Because making a college cut $10 million with six months left in the fiscal year is like a $20 million cut from day one. That shreds muscle, not fat."
 
Kennedy, who is no stranger to criticizing the Gov, paints a vivid picture of the current attempts to balance out budget deficits, by comparing the tactics being used by Government to poor finance choices when attempting to pay off a car loan—ideas such as taking out a cash advance, asking your school aged children to pay rent, or attempting to sell a boat (or bond?) for far more than its estimated value.
 
"Your plan may work-for a while," Kennedy says. "Then, as sure as 'eggs is eggs,' you'll go broke, just like Louisiana eventually will if the legislature passes the Jindal Administration's proposed— yet again—unbalanced budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1."
 
This analysis is in stark contrast to the images Jindal has been creating of the Louisiana economy in the national press—citing, "incredible progress growing our economy." Even more so because of Jindal's proposal to cut the private and business income taxes for the State.
 
Kennedy wrote out, in five points, the overarching plan for balancing out:
 
"1. Pretend the state will have an extra $800 million to spend as a result of the yet-to-be realized savings from leasing state hospitals to private hospitals, even though the leases have not been negotiated (a reference to the ongoing attempts to get the Mid-City Hospital in gear and properly funded).
 
2. Refinance the state's tobacco bonds (good idea) but dump the $90 million one-time savings into the operating budget and spend it next year (bad idea).
 
3. Propose to sell state real estate at inflated prices well above appraised value and spend the money before they sell.
 
4. Borrow $100 million from the New Orleans Convention Center to keep our colleges open while promising to repay the loan with the proceeds from future bond issues that will exceed the state's constitutional debt limit.
 
5. Raise college tuition 10% for Louisiana students, who already owe $900 million in student loans, despite the fact that education is the new currency of our global economy and 8% fewer Louisianans have a college degree than the rest of America."
 
Kennedy them surmised his argument by saying, "There's a better way. It's not complicated: don't spend more than you take in, and when you do spend money, spend it on things you need, not things you simply want. Louisiana families know that. So do Louisiana businesses. Why can't government figure it out?"
 
All the more ironic really, given how much Jindal has been sniping up at the White House and President Obama (both in the press and in social media) about uncontrolled spending and an unwieldy and growing government.
 
"...the Obama years will be remembered as the Era of Government Greed," Gov. Jindal recently wrote. "There isn’t a problem President Obama thinks can’t be solved by more taxes and more spending. His solution is always to take more money out of the American economy and put it into the government."
 
"It’s time for [the President] to send to Congress a list of reductions that preserves critical services," Jindal wrote in the National Review. "Every governor has had to balance budgets during tough economic times...It’s time for the president to stop campaigning, stop deploying scare tactics, and do his job."
 
Like he's been doing with his plan to axe the state income tax, Gov. Jindal deployed the Division of Administration to respond Treasurer's statements, the Division of Administration has.
 
 
The Division of Administration performs a wide-range of tasks, including general management of all state finances, preparing the Executive Budget and the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR). The Commissioner of Administration, Kristy Nichols, responded the Treasurer's statement, detailing and dismissing each of Kennedy's arguments and analogies, point for point.
 
“The reality is that the budget is balanced, makes state government more effective and less expensive for taxpayers and continues to help foster an environment where businesses want to invest and create jobs," Nichols said. "At the same time, our budget also protects K-12 schools, colleges and universities and healthcare services.”
 
 
And keeping it above the belt, Nichols almost right out the gate pointed out that the Treasurer is showing his political motivations in some of his points (in this case the Hospital bond funding issue) and Nichols also alleges the treasurer's incompetence.
 
"Treasurer Kennedy reveals himself to be an opponent of reforming the old Charity Hospital model, not to mention that he apparently does not know how to read the budget."
 
Nichols goes on to detail the figures the administration has on the Hospital funding, which is far less than the $800 million Kennedy cites. She also defends several of the other ideas ridiculed by Treasurer Kennedy, including selling assets above the appraised value.
 
 
"Again, the Treasurer exposes himself as a big government defender of the status quo who would rather keep underutilized property in government’s hands instead of downsizing government’s footprint and returning the property to the private sector."
 
 
As the budget is continually hashed out between now and July (when the next fiscal budget kicks in) funding, bond sales, and tax cuts will continue to cause debate on how best to improve the state of the State.
 
Here's the full documents, as released by Kennedy and Nichols:
 

First, the Treasurer:

And, the Jindal Administration:

 

    

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Linzi Falk, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt


Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

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