Search
| Clear, 70 F (21 C)
| RSS | |

SECTIONS:

 

Arts · Politics · Crime
· Sports · Food ·
· Opinion · NOLA ·
Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

VENDREDI

May 26th

Bayou Country Superfest

Mercedes Benz Superdome, 11AM

Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton, Rascal Flatts and many more

 

Magazine St. Art Market

Dat Dog, 4PM

Happy hour + local art

 

Royal Street Stroll

200-900 Blocks of Royal St, 530PM

Led by the Krewe of Cork

 

YP Family Game Night

Urban League of Greater New Orleans, 6PM

Game night for young professionals and their families

 

Toonces and Friends

Marigny Opera House, 7PM

An orchestral journey through time

 

Spektrum Fridays

Techno Club, 10PM

Featuring J.DUB’L and residents Erica and Rye

 

New Thousand + Adrian

Balcony Music Club, 11PM

Violin centered hip hop

 

Free Music Series

Fulton Ally, 10PM

Featuring Bubl Trubl

SAMEDI

May 27th

Palmer Park, 10AM
The May edition of the monthly art market
 
New Orleans Jazz Market, 3PM
Light bites, drinks, DJs
 
Bar Redux, 7PM
Horror, fantasy, and spiritual movies from 13 countries
 
Bacchanel Fine Wine and Spirits, 7:30PM
Progressive jazz from one of the cities best
 
The Howlin Wolf, 8PM
Improvisational funk music
 
Joan Mitchell Center, 8PM
Monthly open mic
 
The Orpheum Theater, 9PM
Tremaine The Tour with support by Mike Angel
 
Santos Bar, 10PM
Mind expanding multi genre music

DIMANCHE

May 28th

NOLA MIX Records, 11AM
Teaching kids to DJ and produce beats
 
The Courtyard Brewery, 3PM
Raffle, silent auction, craft beer
 
Mags on Elysian Fields, 7PM
A new series dedicated to pushing the limits of contemporary music
 
Three Keys, 7PM
OC cabaret goes Sci-Fi
 
UNO Lakefront Arena, 8PM
Celebrating the 20th anniversary of her debut album
 
One Eyed Jacks, 10PM
Remixes, edits and originals of Fleetwood Mac
 
Rare Form, 10PM
Vintage sounds of American Root Music

Blackout, Euphoria Highlight LPO's Presentation of Mahler's Symphony No. 3


by Joe Shriner

On Thursday evening, as the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra thundered into the final ominous seconds of the third movement of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 3, the lights at First Baptist Church, New Orleans began to fade. One by one, the lights then died. By the time the New Orleans Children's Chorus had gathered themselves onto the stage to participate in the second half, there was a complete blackout in the Lakeview church.

 

A brief lull ensued, as audiences in the darkened pews pondered whether this was done intentionally. After all, the following movement, which is unsettling in any light, would begin with the soloist imploring: “O Man! Take heed! What says the deep midnight?”

 

Never a group for such gimmicks, the orchestra appeared to be just as confounded as the crowd. As the seconds progressed, the lights of cell phones and a growing murmur dappled and rippled through the pitch-black church. After a minute, the familiar voice of conductor Carlos Miguel Prieto pierced through the crowd’s speculations. “Ladies and gentlemen,” he announced in his distinct Mexican accent, “we are phoning Entergy. This only seems to happen during the Super Bowl and Mahler.”

 

The audience erupted in laughter and ovations, and an impromptu 30-minute intermission began.

 

Despite the setback, there was a genuine feeling of goodwill and conviviality among patrons and musicians, who exchanged small talk and snapped photographs of one another, gleefully sauntering about the moonlit church. This was to be anticipated. The LPO’s performance of the first three movements of Mahler’s capricious and celestial third symphony was so breathtaking that it was hard to not feel as though one was taking part in an event that was larger than the individual. To paraphrase one voice overheard in the darkness: “It’s like the orchestra isn’t even playing the music—the music seems to be playing them.”

 

The opening movement, accented by a storm of tympanis and roaring violas and bass, forms a cauldron in which an abundance of life is spawned. This movement, longer than entire symphonies, captivates the listener's full attention. Listeners audibly gasped as the LPO drew the movement to a close, with many fighting back the desire to applaud, as tradition prohibits.

 

The following movements were bright and playful, with horns and woodwinds heightening the performances of the strings. A horn solo, performed offstage in the third, took listeners out of the church and into another realm.

 

When the lights came back on to howling cheers, it appeared the delay only dampened the enthusiasm of a handful of the crowd, who apparently went home. The remaining majority sidled closer to the stage for the final three movements of the concert, welcoming mezzo-soprano Marietta Simpson to the stage. Her sobering interpretation of Nietzsche’s words of humankind’s pain and desire for eternal redemption was robust and assured.

 

The fifth movement, which featured an all-female contingent of the Symphony Chorus of New Orleans and members of the New Orleans Children's Chorus, was remarkably optimistic and shining, spotlighting gorgeous melodies on viola and glockenspiel, with the children's choir imitating bells. Ms. Simpson filled the room with her rich voice, accompanied by the female chorus.

 

The final movement, with its many nuances, swirling emotion, and colorful melodies, is so complex that it takes audiences on the edge of euphoria. A fitting end to the LPO’s final concert this season, Maestro Prieto’s interpretation evoked images of a long, spectacular sunset, marking the conclusion of an exciting year, and propelling enthusiasm for the next.

 

The LPO will be presenting this program again, and most likely without interruption, at 7:30 tonight at First Baptist Church, New Orleans. Tickets start at $20. For more details, visit the LPO website or call (504) 523-6530.




view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter
view counter


Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily