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Defender Picks

 

Vendredi

April 18th

Sirens Album Release

Gasa Gasa (7 p.m.)

With Madonnathan & All People, Brent Houzenga, and more  

 

Nigel Hall and Friends 

Blue Nile (10 p.m.)

with Eric Bolivar, Andrew Block, Eric Bloom, and Eric Vogel 

 

Uptown Get Down feat. Chicken George

Tipitina's (9 p.m.)

Plus DJ Quickie Mart, Unicorn Fukr & more

 

Ellis Marsalis Quartet

Snug Harbor (8 p.m., 10 p.m.)

Famous local Jazz pianist and bandleader performs  

 

Singin' in the Rain Screening

NOMA’s Sculpture Garden (5 p.m.)

Friday nights at NOMA and Moonlight Movies come together  

 

YG

House of Blues (9 p.m.)

Rapper makes stop on his My Krazy Life tour  

 

Guitar Lightnin' Lee

Kermit’s Mother in Law Lounge (10 p.m.)

Bluesy New Orleans guitar   

Samedi

April 19th

Booksigning with Arita Bohannan

Gallery Burguieres (7 p.m.)

Author reads and signs copies of crime drama ‘Docket 76’  

 

Crescent City Classic

Loyola Ave. and Poydras (8 a.m.)

Annual 10k Ends near City Park 

 

Easter Keg Hunt

NOLA Brewing (1 p.m.)

?Scavenger hunt beginning at the taproom, to benefit Gulf Restoration Network 

 

Gaynielle Neville

Maple Leaf (10:30 p.m.)

CD Release Party  

 

Mystikal

Howlin’ Wolf (9:30 p.m.)

Plus YMCMB Flow, G Unit’s Kidd Kidd, 5th Ward Weebie, and 3D Natee

 

SwampGrease feat. Nigel Hall & Terence Higgins 

Tipitina's (9 p.m.)

Andrew Block, Eric Vogel, Erica Falls, Kendrick Marshall, plus John Lisi and Delta Funk

 

Shoebox Lounge

Shadowbox Theatre (8 p.m.)

Shoes, booze, and prostitutes

 

Earth Day Fest

Armstrong Park (10 a.m.- 7 p.m.)

Green Business Expo, music, and more from La. Bucket Brigade 

 

HUSTLE with DJ Soul Sister

Hi Ho Lounge (11 p.m.- 3 a.m.)

Rare grooves from the '70's every Saturday 

 

Corey Henry's Treme Funktet

Blue Nile (10 p.m.)

Local trombonist and his band play traditional NOLA music, from blues, to jazz, to gospel 

 

Dimanche

April 20th

Gay Easter Parade

Armstrong Park (4:30 p.m.)

Official Gay Easter parade rolls through the French Quarter

 

Goodchildren Easter Parade

Press & St. Claude (1:30 p.m.)

The Social Aide & Pleasure Club throws their annual parade through the Bywater

 

Todd Snider 

Tipitina’s (7:30 p.m.)

Folk-rock and Americana 

 

Joe Krown Trio

Maple Leaf (10:30 p.m.)

Krown, Batiste, and Washington every Sunday 

 

French Quarter Easter Parade

Canal & Bourbon St. (1 p.m.)

Chris Owens leads the charge            

 

Hot 8 Brass Band

Howlin’ Wolf- The Den (10 p.m.)

Premiere NOLA brass with hip-hop, R&B and more 


Birdfoot Hops the Night Train to Frenchmen


by Joe Shriner

On Thursday, the familiar reverberations of traditional jazz quintets, guitar-slinging buskers, and curbside brass bands on Marigny’s most dynamic street are going to have some new sounds to contend with. In one venue among the babble of barflies, fourteen artists will be offering classical works inspired by clouds and trains, as well as some serious counterpoint.

 

Birdfoot Festival presents “Night Train" at Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro, the first pair of four featured concerts, taking on two radically different sets of chamber music. At 8 pm, Birdfoot artists will be presenting Kaija Saariaho’s textured “Cloud Trio” for string trio and Steve Reich’s seminal “Different Trains” for string quartet, taped speech, and sound effects. At 10 pm, they will present that vaunted paragon of baroque composition: J.S. Bach’s “Goldberg Variations.”

 

Making its Frenchmen debut, “Cloud Trio” is a contemporary work by award-winning Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho. Comprised of four layered movements, this piece was written in the French Alps, inspired by the composer’s gaze into the vast sky beyond the mountains. In her program notes, Saariaho does not volunteer which cloud shapes gave her inspiration, encouraging listeners to reach their own conclusions.

 

Celebrated American composer Steve Reich’s “Different Trains,” first performed in 1988, is probably the most famous and compelling of his works. As a child of divorced parents living in New York and Los Angeles, Reich spent much of the first years of World War II travelling across the country by train. Reich, who is Jewish, later observed that if he had lived in Europe when he was a child, he would have been riding trains to concentration camps.

 

Made up of three separate movements, Reich’s composition explores different journeys: “America - before the war,” “Europe - during the war,” and “After the war.” Using spoken phrases from taped conversations with the nanny accompanying him on his trips, an American railroad employee, and archival recordings of Holocaust survivors, Reich extracts phrases and turns them into musical passages that underscore the driving rhythm from the strings.

 

The second set presents one rather prodigious work published 247 years earlier. The cult of personality surrounding J.S. Bach kindles not just excessive extolling by musicians and critics repeating observations of his sonic perfection and astonishing career, but it makes the composer so easy to disparage. There have been volumes written about his genius and no fewer blog entries and articles about how overrated and even boring his music is. Whatever your opinion, one thing never debated is his inescapable presence in music.

 

Clocking in at around 75 minutes if uninterrupted from beginning to end, Bach’s “Goldberg Variations” is no less overhyped and unduly derided as the composer. This work is made up of 30 variations on an enticing aria and was written to help lull an insomniac Count to sleep at night. The piece is more than just “furniture music,” though. Bach was able to achieve something in these variations that allows listeners to actively or passively engage as they see fit.

 

Much of it is in the presentation, of course, and to witness a performance of the “Goldberg Variations” live in an intimate setting lends itself close and direct audience participation. The presentation at Snug Harbor will feature 12 Birdfoot artists, including both pianists Prach Boondiskulchok and Danny Driver, as well as three string trios presenting string arrangements of variations.

 

Each set costs $15 for general admission, and $10 for students with a valid ID required at the door. Tickets are on sale through Snug Harbor Bistro’s website or by calling (504) 949-0696.

 

For additional information on this and two remaining festival events, visit the Birdfoot website or call 504-451-6578. Also, be sure to stick with the NOLA Defender for continuing coverage.




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Ian Hoch, Will Dilella, Chris Rinaldi, Lianna Patch, Phil Yiannopoulos, Cate Czarnecki, Mary Kilpatrick, Norris Ortolano, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Kailyn Davillier, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham

Staff Writers

Kerem Ozkan, Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings

Elisabeth Morgan

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Robert, Daniel Paschall

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Deputy Managing Editor

M.D. Dupuy

Managing Editor

Stephen Babcock

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.