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THE

Defender Picks

 

Mardi

October 21st

Wayne Curtis: The Last Great Walk

Garden District Bookshop, 6p.m.

A story about the first person to walk across from New York to San Francisco

 

Warpaint with Liam Finn

Republic, 8p.m.

Los Angeles rock band celebrating second album release

 

Do the Right Thing

Dillard University Campus, 2601 Gentilly Blvd, 7p.m.

Spike Lee’s 24-hour Brooklyn drama to screen at Dillard

 

Meschiya Lake and the Little Big Horns

Spotted Cat, 6p.m.

Jazz singer with a vintage twist

 

Mercedi

October 22nd

New Orleans Beer: A Hoppy History of Big Easy Brewing (Old U.S. Mint, 7 p.m.)

A tasting and lecture with two New Orleans brewmasters

 

Macy Gray with The Way Tour + The Honorable South + Cory Nokey

Tipitina’s, 8:30p.m.

Soulful chanteuse to enchant audiences at Tip’s

 

Susan Morse: The Dog Stays in the Picture

Garden District Bookshop, 6p.m.

Susan Morse discusses and signs her book

 

“Franklin, Armfield, and Ballard: The Men Who Made the Domestic Slave Trade into Big Business” a lecture with Joshua D. Rothman

THNOC, 6p.m.

Rothman to discuss three men who dealt in the slave trade during the 19th century

 

Crescent City Farmers Market

French Market, 2p.m – 6p.m.

Brand new French Quarter edition of the city's prime local market

Jeudi

October 23rd

The Delta Saints

Publiq House, 10p.m.

“Bourbon-fueled bayou rock” Nashville group

 

Dylan Landis: Rainey Royal  

Garden District Bookshop, 6p.m.

14 narratives from Greenwich Village in the 70s

 

Julian Benasis

Republic, 10p.m.

EDM producter/ DJ to play with Buck 10, DXXXY & SFAM

 

James Nolan - YOU DON'T KNOW ME

Octavia Books, 6p.m.

New Orleans writer James Nolan reads and signs his new interrelated collection of short stories

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6-8p.m.

This week featuring a Fais Do-Do with Ike Marr and Martin Shears

Vendredi

October 24th

Alton Brown Live! The Edible Inevitable Tour

Saenger Theatre, 8p.m.

Food Network star brings his live show to the Crescent City

 

MOVIES IN THE GARDEN: NORTH BY NORTHWEST

Sydney & Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden at NOMA, 5p.m.

Alfred Hitchcocks thriller starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint

 

Selebrating Sierra Leone: Music by Imaginary Frenz

House of Blues, 7p.m.

Fundraiser to support Ebola relief efforts in West Africa.

 

Cottonmouth Kings

Spotted Cat, 10p.m.

Smokin’ swing and jazz music at one of the city’s best dancing venues

 

Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers

Blue Nile 8p.m.

Friday nights with Kermit on Frenchmen ($10)


The Baguette Stands Alone

Breads on Oak Resurrects Old New Orleans Baking Traditions



Upriver on Oak Street, a healthy few blocks past the heavy menus of Jacques-Imo’s, Tru Burger and Squeal BBQ, a new and very legitimate bakery opened today. 

 

NoDef talked to the owners of Breads on Oak (8640 Oak Street) and tried their damn-good goodies at their soft opening today.

 

After six months of renovation at the former home of Accardo’s Appliance Parts on the corner of Oak and Monroe Streets, Sean and Chamain O’Mahony are serving artisanal baguettes, Gruyere cheese bread, olive Provence bread with fresh-picked herbs, vegan pastries and, as expected from a man named O’Mahony, Irish soda breads.

 

The front of the bakery has a subtle, but tasteful French décor. A lot of the materials used to renovate the space were recycled, as part of Chamain’s green-conscious philosophy. The space itself feels healthy, spacious and clean. The bakery equipment occupies most of the space. There are no walls to separate customers from watching their goods being made.

 

Sean O’Mahony has been baking off and on for 20 years. He first learned how to bake in a French bakery in Utah many years ago. He picked up the basic skills, then trained under World Champion Baker Pierre Zimmermann, who, judging by O’Mahony’s baguette, taught him well.

 

Asked what critical moment convinced Sean and his wife to open the bakery, Sean said, “I missed the breads. I missed baking, and European bread.”

 

The couple goes to Europe once or twice a year, and believe New Orleanians shouldn’t have to hop the Atlantic for truly artisanal baked goods.

 

Sean discovered his mission as a baker in New Orleans when reading a Bakers Review from 1910, which discussed a bakery on Bourbon Street known as “The Old Slave Bakery.”

 

In the article, Sean learned that New Orleans had the most bakers per capita in America. These bakers practiced the Old World French techniques and 12-hour long fermentation process. Through Breads on Oak, Sean O’Mahony plans to carry on the tradition.

 

“New Orleans was the place to go for the best bread in America. I want to bring that back,” Sean said smiling from behind the counter.

 

Nowadays, bread in this town is relied upon as the important bookend of a drenched po-boy, but rarely does it stand alone. Breads on Oak hopes to offer a baked good that doesn't need a deep fried pairing.

 

Sean said the centerpiece of his breads is the crust and, specifically, “the large crumb.”

 

“I didn’t know if people would like that here, because of po-boys, but that’s the big gamble.” After trying a few of his breads, we at NoDef would like to place a bet in Sean’s favor.

 

You can imagine a little Parisian boy carrying Sean’s baguettes down the rue. They are dusted in flour with deep brown bottoms, crispy crusts, and soft and connective middles.

 

“You shouldn’t have to go to Europe to get this,” Sean said.

 

Sean said he can pump out 180 baguettes every 20 minutes with his new setup. Baguettes are the hardest to make, Sean said, besides the delicious multigrain. The multigrain breads take a labor-intensive three days to make. The result is a fresh, healthy bread that makes you want to cut it in half and rest your cheek on it.

 

Chamain, who is a vegan, bakes all the vegan pastries and muffins. NoDef assumed that because she is a vegan, she must not be from here. She kindly replied that there are, in fact, a rare “few of us at Veggie Fest” every year. Her vegan lemon-blueberry muffin convinced us carnivores at NoDef that vegans can bake. It is a perfect balance between lemon, handpicked blueberries, and healthy delight.

 

On being one of the very few bakeries with this many fresh vegan options in New Orleans, Sean said, “It’s my wife, I don’t have a choice.” He also said that most European breads, when made properly, are naturally vegan. The O’Mahonys' bakery also serves non-vegan breads and pastries, like croissants and brioches.

 

Today was only a soft opening. The bakery will be open on Fridays and Saturdays during the summer, until the hard opening in the Fall. Eventually, the O’Mahonys plan to serve healthy sandwiches and more pastries with fresh berries from their fruit orchard on the West Bank.

 

Breads on Oak is located on 8640 Oak Street, and is open Fridays and Saturdays in the summer. 504.669.5173.

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock