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THE

Defender Picks

 

mercredi

September 2nd

Gentleman’s Agreement

Prytania, 10a.m.

Gregory Peck stars as a journalist 

 

Culture Collision

US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center, 5:30p.m.

65 of New Orlean’s visual and performing arts organizations culturally colliding

 

The Fritz

Gasa Gasa, 9p.m.

Funk rock from Asheville

 

Hill Country Hounds

Maple Leaf Bar, 9p.m.

Country rock hailing from the mountains of the USA

 

Hazy Ray

Howlin’ Wolf, 8:30p.m.

Funk-rock with a New Orleans twist

 

Major Bacon

Banks St. Bar, 10p.m.

Grammy-nominated jazz and free BLTs

jeudi

September 3rd

Earth

OEJ, 7p.m.

Rock/metal from Olympia, Washington

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden, 6p.m.

This week ft. Chase Gassaway

 

EDEN

Contemporary Arts Center, 7p.m. 

Film screening explores the life a Parisian musician after the peak of his musical career

 

Bayou International Reggae Night 

Blue Nile, 11p.m.

Reggae spun by DJ T

 

Brass-A-Holics

Freret St. Publiq House, 9:30p.m.

The classic Nola crew rocks Freret

 

Thursdays at Twilight

City Park, 6p.m.

This week ft. Joe Krown Swing Band

vendredi

September 4th

Mötley Crüe

Smoothie King Center, 8p.m.

The heavy metal band’s final tour

 

Louisiana Seafood Festival 

City Park Festival Grounds, 11a.m.

Celebration of the state’s seafood and music

 

Saints vs. Packers

Lambeau Field, 6p.m.

Last preseason game

 

 

Friday Nights at NOMA

NOMA, 5p.m.

Arts and Letters with Thomas Beller

 

Foundation Free Fridays

Tip’s, 9p.m.

Free evening of music this week ft. Flow Tribe and Stoop Kids

 

futureBased + Carneyval

Republic, 10p.m. 

Get your electronic fix

samedi

September 5th

Super Fresh Hip Hop Fest

Lakefront Arean, 8p.m.

Salt N Pepa, Slick Rick and others take Nola

 

Louisiana Seafood Festival 

City Park Festival Grounds, 11a.m.

Celebration of the state’s seafood and music

 

Disorientation

Howlin’ Wolf, 9:30p.m.

Naughty Professor + Elysian Feel and more

 

 

Bourbon Street Extravaganza

Bourbon and St. Ann Streets, 6p.m.

Free outdoor concert as part of Southern Decadence

 

Crescent City Farmer’s Market

700 Magazine St., 8a.m.-12p.m.

Downtown edition of the city's prime local market

dimanche

September 6th

Louisiana Seafood Festival 

City Park Festival Grounds, 11a.m.

Last day to grab some seafood and catch some jams

 

Mistress America

Prytania, 12p.m.;2p.m.;4p.m.;6p.m.;8p.m.;10p.m.

A college freshman is seduced by her step-sister’s mad schemes

 

What So Not

Republic, 9p.m.

Australian electronic music project

 

September Open Mic & Slam

Old Marquer Theater, 6:30p.m.

Monthly slam and fundraiser 

 

Southern Decadence Walking Parade

Golden Lantern, 2p.m.

Pride and parades


Badon Bill Seeks Reduced Prison Sentences for Pot


In November 2012, the latest round of elections put a number of politicians in office for another term or the first time. Now, as the start of the legislative session looms (April 8), NoDef is taking the time to look at the actual work these politicians are planning for this year -- what they hope to be the fruits of their labor. Once again, State Rep. Austin Badon (D-New Orleans) is proving himself to be in the weeds with HB 103, which sets to create more appropriate sentences for marijuana and cannabinoid offenses.

 

The sentences that could help boost the state's economy by collecting fines, and reducing the state's world-record prison population with more realistic sentencing guidelines.

 

The proposed changes to the law would amend the criminal penalties for, "second and subsequent convictions of possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabinoids and prohibits the application of the Habitual Offender Law to possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabinoid offenses," the bill's abstract states.

 

For the first offense remains as a maximum of $500 fine or six months in jail. For the second offense, the penalty is reduced from a maximum $2,500 fine to a $500 fine or a year in prison. It would also repeal the provision in the current law that have special probation criteria for the second offense.

 

The new law also creates hierarchy, by distinguishing between the third and subsequent offenses, and also creates a distinction for these drug offenses and violent felonies that should earn someone decades in prison.

 

Penalties for a third offense comes down from a 20-year sentence and a possible $5,000 fine to a fine of $2,000, a prison term of no more than two-years, or both. Finally, any other violations would either be fined $2,000, no more than five-years in prison, or both. This brings down the potential penalty for offenders from the 20-years prescribed by the habitual offenders statute (commonly called three-strikes laws).

 

The proposed law also accommodates motions to reconsider sentencing for those who are or would have been forced to serve the previous maximums, or those serving under the habitual offenders statute. 

 

"Proposed law removes possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabinoids as a possible offense for which an offender may be sentenced pursuant to the Habitual Offender Law," the abstract for HB 103 says. "[Also] proposed law authorizes a defendant who is incarcerated after having been convicted of and sentenced according to the provisions of [the] present law regarding possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabinoids or present law habitual offender provisions, wherein at least one of the offenses which forms the basis for such sentence is a conviction for possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabinoids... if the defendant has served at least half of the maximum term of imprisonment provided for in proposed law."

 

Essentially, if one of the felony convictions that would have had an offender serving life was handed down because of marijuana, that person could file a motion to have the judgement reconsidered under the sentencing guidelines outlined in the new law, as long as they have served half the maximum sentence.

 

As of 2012, Louisiana held the honor of having the highest prison population in the world, with an estimated 40,000 people locked up in the state's prisons. That number is cited as thirteen times times the total number of inmates in Chinese prisons. In 2007, the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that more than 12-percent of inmates at the state and federal levels are serving for marijuana offenses, costing Americans an estimated one billion dollars a year (that's with nine zeroes people).

 

The bill goes before the legislature this session, which commences Monday, April 8. 




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Theatre Critic

Michael Martin

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock