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THE

Defender Picks

 

Vendredi

November 28th

The New Orleans Suspects feat. Paul Barrere of Little Feat

Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Also with special guests Ed Volker (The Radiators) and John “Papa” Gros

 

Tank and the Bangas “Stone Soul Picnic”

Chickie Wah Wah, 10p.m.

Rhythmic soul and spoken word from locally formed group led by singer Tarriona Ball

 

Grayson Capps

Carrollton Station, 10p.m.

Raw bayou blues done right + Lauren Murphy; $2 Rolling Rock

 

Luke Winslow King w/SamDoores (The Deslondes/Hurray for the Riff Raff)

d.b.a., 10p.m.

Fresh Americana from Nola rooted musicians $10

 

Kermit Ruffins & The BBQ Swingers

Blue Nile, 7p.m.

Friday nights with Kermit on Frenchmen ($10)

 

Brass-A-Holics vs. Mainline

Blue Nile, 11p.m.

Dueling brass

 

DJ Black Pearl

Blue Nile Balcony Room, 1a.m.

Two nights of EDM from the princess of Indian dj’s

 

Teairra Mari: All Black Affair

House of Blues, 11p.m.

Presented by Tscolee & Loft 360 Society she's sung w/ Gucci Mane & Soulja Boy

 

Lalah Hathaway, Najee, Anthony David

Saenger Theatre, 7:30p.m.

Grammy-winning singer brings soul to the Saenger

 

Bayou Classic Golf Tournament

Joe Bartholomew Golf Course (Pontchartrain Park), 10a.m.

Test your driving and putting skills in this bonafide local tournament

 

Career & College Fair

Hyatt Regency Hotel, 10a.m.-3p.m.

Part of Bayou Classic’s events helping companies and graduates connect

 

Battle of the Bands And Greek Show

Superdome, 6p.m.

A decades long rivalry features a battle of school marching bands in preparation for tomorrow’s big game

 

Marc Broussard

Southport Music Hall, 8p.m.

Son of Boogie King’s Ted Broussard this cajun’s voice is full of well-placed soul

 

Black Friday Fiasco

Banks St. Bar, 10p.m.-3a.m.

A tribute to the Ramones with sideshows by lydia Treats, Pope Matt Thomas and burlesque from Xena Zeit-Geist

 

 

Samedi

November 29th

Water Isaacson - The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers Geniuses, and Geeks Created a Digital Revolution 

Newman, 1-3p.m.

Hear author of Steve Jobs speak about pioneer of computer programming Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s daughter and other innovators of the digital age

 

Cedric Burnside Project ft Garry Burnside and Gravy

Tipitina’s, 10p.m.

Catch this Blues Hall of Famer uptown

 

Little Freddie King

The Beatnik, 9p.m.

Join this class act local bluesman in Central City

 

FKA Twigs

Republic, 9p.m.

The sexiest electronic R&B show you’ll probably ever go to

 

Build Your Own Bloody Mary Bar

The Country Club, 10a.m.-3p.m.

Do it how you live it + $10 bottomless Mimosas every Sat and Sun

 

DJ Black Pearl

Blue Nile Balcony Room, 1a.m.

Two nights of EDM from the princess of Indian dj’s

 

Hustle w/ DJ Soul Sister

Hi Ho Lounge, 9p.m.-1a.m.

Get ya hustle on to humble resident DJ who spins it how she lives it

 

John Boutte

d.b.a., 8p.m.

Witness local jazz vocalist’s voice floating on Frenchmen ($10)

 

Funk Monkey

d.b.a., 10p.m.

Second-line funk and dank boogaloo groove made to make ya move ya feet

 

Eric Lindell

d.b.a., 11p.m.

San Franciscan native turned Cajun sifts through elements of blues and soul $15

 

Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue

Siberia, 10p.m.

Authentic N.O. honky-tonk rockgal

 

Down

Southport Hall, 7p.m.

Philip Anselmo's local metal cult 

 

Bayou Classic

Superdome, 1:30p.m.

Rivals Southern University and Grambling State duke it out for the 41st time in this annually played game

 

Fan Fest

Champions Square, 9a.m.-1p.m.

Music outside da dome featuring 5th Ward Weebie and more

 

Dimanche

November 30th

Saints vs Steelers

Heinz Fields, 12p.m.

Through long games of labor, and nights devoid of ease, the Saints still hear in their souls the music of wonderful Who Dat melodies and silently steal away

 

Nick Spitzer and American Routes Presents Sleepy LaBeef

Chickie Wah Wah, 8p.m.

This 76 year old honky-tonk gives new meaning to the term live show

 

The Palmetto Bug Stompers

d.b.a., 6p.m.

Do tha dance to traditional jazz with Washboard Chaz, Will Smith, Paul Roberson, Seva Venet, Robert Snow, Bruce Brachman and John Dodli

 

Cannabis Corpse

Siberia, 10p.m.

Weed-themed Death Metal from Richmond, VA

 

Luna Fete

Gallier Hall, 7p.m. & 7:30p.m.

Projection mapping and spatial augmented reality starts tonight

 

Micah McKee & Little Maker

Circle Bar, 5-9p.m.

Free music for happy hour


'From the Back of the Room' Looks at Women in Punk Rock - Beyond the Riot


by Osa Atoe

Amy Oden is a 30-year-old filmmaker and musician from Washington, DC. She recently finished a new documentary on women in punk & hardcore called From the Back of the Room, which will screen in Mid-City this Monday. This is not a riot grrrl documentary! As important as that movement was, women in punk rock have a variety of expressions and aesthetics and shouldn't all be lumped into one box based on gender.

 

From the Back of the Room features interviews with illustrator, zinester  and musician, Cristy Road, hardcore band Condenada, Saira of Detesation, Kristin of Negative Approach, Anna Joy of Blatz as well as riot grrrl ring leaders like Bikini Kill's Kathleen Hannah and Allison Wolfe. We caught up with each other on a busy weekday afternoon to do this interview.

 

Osa Atoe: Is this your first movie?

 

AO: Yeah, this is my first feature-length.

 

OA: You've made shorts before, then?

 

AO: I made a 40 minute documentary in college about the DC hardcore scene, which screened at the Black Cat. Also, I worked for several years at a
non-profit TV station in Virginia, shooting and editing short-form documentaries for them.

 

OA: When did the DC hardcore documentary come out and what was it called?

 

AO: It's called “After the Salad Days” and it came out in 2004.

 

OA Is there any way for people to find it? I wanna watch it.

 

AO: I didn't really tour on it or distribute it that widely because I figured no one would be interested in it outside of DC. I posted it on YouTube, actually. It was really just about what I perceived to be a resurgence of "traditional" style DC hardcore around the year 2000, with bands like Striking Distance and Desperate Measures and stuff like that...

 

OA: When did you start to think critically about your experience as a women in the punk scene?

 

AO: Well, I think my "coming to consciousness" or whatever you want to call it kind of began taking place when I hit my early 20's. That's when I started thinking about gender and standing up for myself more and trying to be more deliberate about getting along with other women. Prior to that I was kind of a tomboy. I didn't really hang out with other girls too much. I started taking women's studies classes in college, and reading a lot about feminism and I guess that must've been when it hit me that it was important to translate those ideas into my life.

 

OA: So, did you feel like you had to struggle as a womeA in your local scene, or was it more about being inspired by the legacy of feminism and wanting to live that out?

 

AO: I think more the latter. At that point, maybe when I was about 23 or so, I had already been going to shows for about 7 years. I was always kind of outspoken and abrasive, but I think that's when I learned what to direct my anger towards and away from, if that makes any sense. For instance, I remember one day reading something that explained the idea of female competition—this is about seven or eight years ago now—and deliberately trying to examine and change my behavior towards other women after that. But that was just one in a series of awakenings I think I went through. I think I'm always learning. That's what life feels like to me.

 

OA: So, there are already a couple documentaries about women in punk out there. There's Don't Need You, and recently a woman showed a documentary in New Orleans called "Whistlin' Dixie" about queer DIY & punk bands in the South.  What did you want to add to the documentation of women in punk that hadn't already been covered?  From seeing the trailer, it looks like you wanted to focus more on hardcore & crust than just riot girl. 

 

AO: Yeah, I've heard of Whistlin' Dixie but haven't seen it. It sounds awesome. I saw “Don't Need You” a while ago, and I think that and AfroPunk were the two biggest films that I knew of about women in DIY. And also “Rise Above, the Tribe 8 movie. I think I just wanted to make the point that there are tons of women who are punk who aren't necessarily Riot Grrrls—which is how I've felt about my own participation for a long time. I love Riot Grrrl, but I'm not a riot grrrl, and I think a lot of women get pushed into that box.

 

OA: How have you experienced that personally? Like, with reviews of your band?

 

AO: Reviews of my band, yes. Even close friends listing us as riot grrrl on fliers. The movie gets described as a riot grrrl movie a lot, which is frustrating, because that's the exact opposite of the point. From what I've heard, lots of other women have had this experience as well. It's not the worst thing to be compared to, but it's difficult to feel like you have your own identity when people put you in pre-existing categories.

 

OA: And even within the whole documentation of riot girl, I've been frustrated at how narrow the focus can be. Even within riot girl, there are so many other people to talk to who may not have been as popular, but popularity isn't really the point. I was really glad to see you interviewing folks like Anna Joy of Blatz..

 

Amy: Yeah definitely, Blatz was such an important band for me, growing up.

 

OA: Which have you been doing longer, making movies or playing in bands?*

 

AO: Movies, definitely. I only started playing in bands in 2007.

 

OA: What's the name of your band and what do you play?*

 

AO: I'm not currently in a band but I've been in two in the past. My first band was a crusty band called Starve, and the most recent band was an all-lady band called Hot Mess. That was more of a straightforward punk band. I sang in both of those bands. Hopefully I'll do another one at some point.

 

OA: Who are some of your musical influences and did you get to interview any of them?

 

AO: Most of my influences, musically, are older crusty bands.  I love Filth and Dystopia and stuff like that, but I also like a lot of hardcore and stoner metal.  I was really stoked to interview Saira from Detestation, that was definitely one of my influences.

 

OA: How long is your movie tour and where are you headed?

 

AO: Well, I've done a bunch of trips into New England at this point - I did a three week tour already to the midwest and through Canada in August also. This particular tour in November is 10 days and it's down to Austin and back.

 

 

From the Back of the Room movie screening and potluck is set for November 7, 2011 at 6 p.m. at Nowe Miasto Warehouse, 223 Jane Place in Mid-City near Broad Avenue and Banks Street.




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock