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Defender Picks

 

Vendredi (10.24)

October 25th

Gleason Gras

Champions Square (4p.m.)

Raise ALS awareness with a fest

 

Alton Brown Live! The Edible Inevitable Tour

Saenger Theatre, 8p.m.

Food Network star brings his live show to the Crescent City

 

MOVIES IN THE GARDEN: NORTH BY NORTHWEST
Sydney & Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden at NOMA, 5p.m.

Alfred Hitchcocks thriller starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint

 

Selebrating Sierra Leone: Music by Imaginary Frenz

House of Blues, 7p.m.

Fundraiser to support Ebola relief efforts in West Africa.

 

Cottonmouth Kings

Spotted Cat, 10p.m.

Smokin’ swing and jazz music at one of the city’s best dancing venues

 

Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers

Blue Nile 8p.m.

Friday nights with Kermit on Frenchmen ($10)

 

Audubon's Avenger Becomes Berger Field


After years of jumping through hoops, NORD has finally installed a sign marking the David Berger- Avenger Field in Audubon Park.  More than just a “place to play ball,” the field commemorates Berger, one of the 11 victims of the 1972 Munich Olympic bombings. 

 

“Our young people are going to understand that this Berger Field, not Avenger Field, is an honor of a hero,” said City Councilmember-at-Large Jackie Clarkson.  “It states the name, and children will ask and they could be told about a hero.  There has to be a message.”  Clarkson reminiscences on the somewhat overlooked trend of naming parks after heroes like Mickey Markey Park in the Bywater. 

 

“The new NORD is doing it right.  How hard could one sign?   It took a village,” said Clarkson laughing. 

 

Although a Cleveland resident, Berger attended Tulane University where he excelled in both academics and weightlifting.  Despite his short stature, Berger could lift more than twice his own weight, a feat that would eventually land him a place on the Israeli Olympic weightlifting team. 

 

“When they use their field they’re not just going to a field,” said Rabbi Ed Cohn of Temple Sinai.  The field symbolizes Berger’s struggle to not only achieve his goal in weightlifting, but also his strength in the face of terrorism.  The field “memorializes something that is eternal: what David stood for.”  

 

Berger’s brother, Fred Berger, gave a teary-eyed account of the athlete’s life— from his first pull-up to his last performance on the world’s stage.  His friend from Tulane also retold stories of the typical college student with extraordinary talent, passion and tenacity.  Although cut short at 28, Berger takes comfort in the idea that he accomplished his ultimate Olympic goal.       

 

“We dedicate an honored place here in the Crescent City to the memory of David Berger, a son of Tulane and a pride to all who ever knew him and with the ten other Israeli athletes who were robbed of a fullness of life,” said Rabbi Cohn.  

 




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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock