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THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

September 2nd

Yulman Stadium Dedication
Tulane Yulman Stadium, 3-5p.m.
Opening ceremonies for the Green Wave’s new stadium
 

Hidden Treasures: Restaurant Edition
Old U.S. Mint, 6 & 7p.m.
Two nightly tours of the Louisiana State Museum’s collection of restaurant ephemera ($20)

 

Progression Music Series
Gasa Gasa, 8p.m.
This week ft. Barry's Pocket + Christin Bradford Band

 

Comedy Beast
Howlin Wolf Den, 8:30p.m.
Free comedy show

 

Nik Turner's Hawkwind, Witch Mountain, Hedersleben, Mountain of Wizard
Siberia, 9p.m.
Hawkwind and Space Ritual saxophonist still touring the world ($12)

 

Punk Night
Dragon’s Den, 10p.m.
This week ft. The Boy Sprouts, The Noise Complaints, Mystery Girl, Interior Decorating

MERCREDI

September 3rd

Restaurant Week Kickoff Party
The Chicory, 6-8p.m.
The Restaurant Association invites the public to sample bites and libations ($25)

 

The He and She Show
Siberia, 6p.m.
Live stand-up ft. Doug and Teresa Wyckoff, Andrew Polk, Molly Rubin-Long, Duncan Pace ($7)

 

Katy Simpson Smith: The Story of Land and Sea
Columns Hotel, 7p.m.
Author presents her debut novel of the American Revolution

 

Alien Ant Farm
Southport Hall, 7:30p.m.
With H2NY, Kaleido, Music from Chaos ($15)

 

Pocket Aces Brass Band
Howlin Wolf Den, 8p.m.
Get your funky brass fill on a Wednesday ($5)

JEUDI

September 4th

Carol McMichael Reese: New Orleans Under Reconstruction
Garden District Book Shop, 6p.m.
Panel discussion by contributors to this informed book on post-Katrina N.O.

 

Katy Simpson Smith: The Story of Land and Sea
Octavia Books, 6p.m.
Author presents her debut novel of the American Revolution

 

Hidden Treasures: Restaurant Edition
Old U.S. Mint, 6 & 7p.m.

Two nightly tours of the Louisiana State Museum’s collection of restaurant ephemera ($20)

 

Ogden After Hours
Ogden Museum, 6-8p.m.

This week ft. Mike Dillon, James Singleton and Johnny Vidacovich

 

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
NOCCA Nims Black Box Theatre, 8p.m.

The NOLA Project presents a stage adapation of Ken Kesey’s classic ($30)

VENDREDI

September 5th

Music Under the Oaks
Audubon Park Newman Bandstand, 4:30-6p.m.

This week ft. John Mahoney Big Band

 

Mark Shapiro: Carbon Shock
Octavia Books, 6p.m.

Journalist’s new book explores intersection of environment and economics

 

Dernière séance
Alliance Française, 7p.m.
A cinema manager turns killer when he learns his beloved theater will close ($5)

 

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
NOCCA Nims Black Box Theatre, 8p.m.

The NOLA Project presents a stage adapation of Ken Kesey’s classic ($30)

 

Foundation Free Fridays: Flow Tribe
Tiptina’s, 10p.m.

CD Release party with Cha Waa, Seven Handle Circus

 

Freddy Mercury Night
Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 10p.m.

Is this real life? Is just fantasy?

 

Royal Teeth, Coyotes
Freret Street Publiq House, 10p.m.

Local indie pop & rock on Freret

 

G-Eazy
Republic, 11p.m.
Loyola grad returns to his home stage ($20)


American Courtesans

Filmmaker & Sex Worker Talks Documentary Filmed Partially in NOLA



American Courtesans tackles the sex industry from the workers' perspective, offering a diverse range of experiences. The documentary was filmed in New Orleans, New York, New Jersey, Washington D.C., and a number of undisclosed locations.

 

Kristen DiAngelo interviewed ten fellow sex workers for the film. Emma Dupree, Erin Marxxx, Gina Robinson, Gina DePalma, Hilary Holiday, Juliet Capulet, Pearl Callahan, Tamsen Crown, Norma Jean Almdovar, and Skylar Cruz shared their stories.

 

Cruz works in New Orleans. DiAngelo said that both her interviewee and she have spent a lot of time in the Crescent City.

 

“I’ve been working there close to 15 years. There’s a lot of history for me and Skylar,” said DiAngelo.

 

The producer explained that Cruz began working when she was still in high school, as a way to support her family. In the film, Cruz gives a tearful account of her beginnings in New Orleans.

 

“Skylar had to make very adult decisions to keep the family together,” said DiAngelo.

 

However, the film offers lesser told stories of women who enter the sex trade in less desperate circumstances.

 

Emma Dupree shares her story with DiAngelo. Her journey strays from the typical narrative surrounding the sex industry. Dupree had a four-year degree, and she was working in real estate when the recession hit. After bar tending and balancing two jobs to make ends meet, Dupree decided to give the escort industry a shot. The experiences she shares with DiAngelo in the film are overwhelmingly positive.

 

DiAngelo explained to NoDef the difference between “survival sex” and a career in the sex industry.

 

“Many people who are on the lower end, no matter what it is they are trying to survive from, their choices in life are limited,” said DiAngelo. “They may have no resources in this whole world. [These are often cases of] gay kids or transgender kids who are kicked of their homes. I could go on ad nauseum,” said DiAngelo.

 

Oftentimes, DiAngelo said, teenagers and young adults in such situations are arrested, which further limits their choices.

 

DiAngelo is a case of someone who “started out as a kid,” as she puts it. “I myself was a victim of a horrible attack. Any day I’m alive is good enough for me. I fought my way up. The difference is that this has become a profession for me,” said DiAngelo.

 

According to DiAngelo and accounts from American Courtesans, people working in the industry create a support system for each other, a safety net in the absence of legal protections.

 

In many cities across the United States, police use condoms as evidence against sex workers. DiAngelo said that she knows people in the industry who have been locked up in New Orleans due to the “condom law.”

 

“It really is an issue of human and civil rights,” said DiAngelo. “The condom law is, sex workers aren’t allowed to use condoms, or they’ll be used as evidence of your intent [to engage in prostitution]” DiAngelo explained.

 

The advocate further explained that the law is primarily, but not solely, used against workers in “survival sex” situations. “It’s the people who aren’t going to fight it. It really is a violation of your rights,” she said.

 

DiAngelo’s overarching goal with the film is to tell untold stories about the sex industry. DiAngelo and the women she interviews emphasize that the industry is flawed primarily because it is criminalized, not because it is inherently dangerous.

 

“It’s a job. Most people don’t jump up and down about going to work at McDonald’s every day,” she said. “But the difference is that once we get here, we’re pretty beaten up by the world. We have no 911 number, and predators target us,” she said.

 

The film was released in July 2013. Those interested can purchase a physical copy of the documentary online, or they can rent or buy the film on iTunes. 

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Contributors:

Dead Huey Long, Emma Boyce, Elizabeth Davas, Ian Hoch, Lindsay Mack, Anna Gaca, Jason Raymond, Lee Matalone, Phil Yiannopoulos, Joe Shriner, Chris Staudinger, Chef Anthony Scanio, Tierney Monaghan, Stacy Coco, Rob Ingraham,

Staff Writers

Cheryl Castjohn, Sam Nelson

Listings Editor

Anna Gaca

Art Listings

Cheryl Castjohn

Photographers

Brandon Roberts, Rachel June, Daniel Paschall

Film Critic

Jason Raymond

Puzzler

Paolo Roy

Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

B. E. Mintz

Published Daily by

Minced Media, Inc.

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock