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Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

LUNDI

April 24th

Zurich Golf Classic

City Park, 11AM

Kick off to a 4-day stop on the PGA Championship tour

 

Crystal Energy Healing & Dream Play

1112 Mandeville St., 2PM

Talk dreams and crystals

 

Andrew Jackson Hotel Ghost Hunt

Andrew Jackson Hotel, 4PM

Sleepover ghost tour at the infamous hotel

 

International Sculpture Day

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 5:30PM

Artists Tara Conley, Rachel David, and Ashley Pridmore will discuss their work

 

Big Easy Entertainment Awards

The Orpheum Theater, 6PM

29th annual event

 

New Orleans Baby Cakes

Shrine On Airline, 7PM

Baby Cakes go up against the Omaha Storm Chasers

 

Movie Screening: La Bataille de Solférino

Cafe Istanbul, 7PM

French film about the 2012 presidential election, following Macron and Le Pen's victories during this weekend's round one

 

Cacao Ceremony

Nola Yoga Loft, 7:30PM

Set intentions for the Full Moon and share a cacao elixir

 

Ooh Poo Pah Doo Monday Blues

Carver Club, 8PM

Hosted by the bar's owner Miss Judy Hill

MARDI

April 25th

Earth Day Celebration

City Park, 4PM

Kiddie crafts, cooking demos, native plant sale, yoga, and more

 

April Hobnobber

The Country Club, 5:30PM

Sip and socialize, with complimentary wine and live music

 

Movie Screening: Ipileaye

Ashé Cac, 6PM

Story of the creation of the world 

 

Pony Up for Horses

Eiffel Society, 6PM

A benefit to aid horses in need

 

Vinyasa & Vino

Nola Yoga Loft, 6:30PM

All-levels yoga following by wine and dinner

 

Swing in the Oaks

City Park, 7PM

Annual free outdoor concert feat. Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra

 

New Moon Medicine Circle

Yes, Yoga., 7:30PM

Celebrate the cycle with visualizations, meditations, journaling, ritual, and group energy healing

 

Aaron Cohen Band

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Local faves, feat. Danny Abel Band, Shhh

 

High Profile | New Orleans Nightlife Awards

Sidney's Saloon, 10PM

Celebrate NOLA's nightlife with Garlic Junior, Jassy, and DJ Visqueen

MERCREDI

April 26th

Wednesdays at the Square

Lafayette Square, 5PM

Feat. Flow Tribe and Robin Barnes

 

Blackout Poetry Workshop

Norman Mayer Branch Library, 5PM

Teen poetry event in blackout poetry of public library books

 

Evenings with Enrique

City Park, 5PM

Feat. Raphael Bas

 

Vietnamese Style Crawfish Boil

Black Penny, 6PM

The famous boil across from Armstrong Park returns

 

Paradigm Pizza & Pies

Paradigm Gardens, 7PM

Urban farm hosts outdoor dinner, with Ancora Pizzeria

 

Eat Your Science

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

Alton Brown live

 

Movie Screening: Annie Hall

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Rooftop screening of the Woody Allen classic

 

Sound Observatory New Orleans: The Shape of Jazz to Come

Three Keys, 9PM

This month's event features Ashlin Parker Trio 

JEUDI

April 27th

 

NOLA Distilling Co. Grand Opening

NOLA Distilling Company, 3PM

Live music from Colin Lake, food from Frencheeze & La Cocinita food trucks

 

Movie Screening: Jazz Fest Shorts

The Old U.S. Mint, 6PM

Films from the inaugural 1970 Jazz Fest

 

Threadhead Thursday

City Park Botanical Gardens, 6PM

Feat. Marcia Ball, Brass-a-Holics, and Paul Sanchez & the Rolling Road Show

 

Sum 41 & Pierce the Veil

House of Blues, 6:30PM

The 'We Will Detonate!' tour

 

International Jazz Day

New Orleans Recreation Development Commission, 7PM

Celebration of jazz music and its influence

 

Jazz & Heritage Gala

Hyatt Regency, 7PM

19th annual benefit feat. a Neville Family Funktion and more

 

St. Paul and the Broken Bones

Orpheum Theater, 9PM

Birmingham band promotes second album "Sea of Noise" 


All the Fray

The Story Behind LBJ's NOLA Civil Rights Speech



HBO premiered “All the Way,” a small screen adaptation of Robert Schenkkan’s TONY award winning play about the early years of LBJ’s presidency and the cicil rights movement. The critically acclaimed film featured proud New Orleans native Anthony Mackie as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., but the NOLA connections go back some 50 plus years. At the center of the work is a speech delivered by the POTUS in an attempt to curb the Dixiecrat faction.

 

The address came at the end of a dual whistle-stops campaigns helmed by Johnson and his wife Lady Bird. The First Lady rode aboard the Lady Bird Special meeting with local leaders aboard her Pullman car at every stop. Both tours ended in NOLA on October 9, 1964, culminating with a ride down Canal in an open car. In an interview, legendary presidential correspondent Helen Thomas described the day as a “triumphal reunion; the whole thing was like a Hollywood ending.”

 

That evening, LBJ spoke at a fundraising dinner at the Jung Hotel. The Jung was located at 1500 Canal Street and is currently the topic of one of many redevelopment debates. However, the building began life far more illustriously in 1908 as the region’s largest convention hotel. Ultimately, it even earned a spot on the National Register of Historical Places in 1982. The destination fell into disrepair in later years. It switched ownership several times and was a Clarion, Radisson, and then the Park Plaza before damage from the Federal Flood ultimately shuttered the doors.

 

However, the night of the big fundraiser, the place was in its prime and packed with Democratic dignitaries. The crowd at the 100 dollar a head  gala included Hale, Lindy, and Tommy Boggs who has also been stumping with the Johnsons during the preceding run. Governor Jack McKeithen, Senator Allen Ellender, Russel Long, Mayor Vic Schiro, and most of the state’s congressional delegation. In addition, the party paid to televise the remarks throughout Louisiana and part of Mississippi.

 

This was no ordinary stump speech though. In ’64, the Democratic party was in the midst of a civil war. Johnson parted with fellow Southerners to push through civil rights legislation enraging the segregationist southern Dem machine. Prominent Dixiecrats like Strom Thurmond split from the party entirely. The rift threatened to put the extremist Barry Goldwater in office. (Pick your own analogy to the current election; there are plenty for all camps).

 

LBJ addressed the split in his normal fashion—head on. Speaking metaphorically of the southern electorate, the President bluntly exclaimed, “they haven't heard a Democratic speech in 30 years. All they ever hear at election time is nigger, nigger, nigger!”

 

The chief executive proceeded to make it clear that despite threats to the contrary, the recently passed Civil Rights Act would be enforced. “So we have the law of the land, and we are going to appeal to all Americans that fight in uniform and work in factory and on the farm to try to conduct themselves as Americans,” Johnson declared. “Equal opportunity for all, special privileges for none, because there is only one real big problem that faces you. It is not even the economic problem and it is not the Negro problem.”

 

The speech then pivoted to the greater problem which the administration believed was national security and peace. The ensuing comments were a jab at Barry Goldwater. Throughout the campaign, the G.O.P. nominee was attacked for his hawkish views. In the famous “Daisy” ad, LBJ went so far as to equate his rival’s election with nuclear armageddon.

 

The piece also included several local references including much love for the Long family, “New Orleans candy… that we call pralines,” local pols, and promises of prosperity. Specifically, the prez promised “a day when New Orleans will stand as a Queen City on this crescent” as an international trade center, a national cultural center, a terminal for waterways, “a good and gracious city for your families to call their home,” and “a port for the spaceships that are returning from outer space.”

 

Accounts of the audience’s reactions varied. The Tuscaloosa News reported that in “politically doubtful Louisiana,” the “remarks drew loud applause.” However, Thomas described the crowd as “stunned.”

 

Regardless of the night’s reception, Johnson managed to win the 1964 election, but potentially he lost the South for a generation. In ’64, the only states that he lost were Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Goldwater’s native Arizona.

 

However, during the next election cycle, Richard Nixon launched the “Southern Strategy.” The tactic deliberately targeted white southern Democrats angered by civil rights legislation often using terms like “law and order” and “states’ rights” as code for racist positions. In ’68, much of the South flipped to the Republican party. The “Deep South” states voted for segregationist George Wallace, but the region has been solidly red since then.

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Linzi Falk, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt


Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily