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Defender Picks

 

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


Adley and Subtract

Senate Opposition to Levee Board Lawsuits Gets Makeover



A new bill that would dismantle controversial levee board lawsuits passed a state senate committee Thursday after heated testimony.

 

The lawsuits, which have been brought against 97 oil and gas companies by the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority East (SFLPA-E), gained the attention of Senator Robert Adley, R- Benton, who filed numerous bills to dismantle the lawsuits and become the face of legislative opposition to the bills. His previous ownership of a natural gas company and present job as consultant for the industry have raised questions about his ties to the industry, the Lens reported. None of his six bills have successfully been sent to the Governor’s desk after passage.

 

Governor Jindal, however, has made it clear that he is in favor of legislation to deal with the levee board lawsuits. Jindal sent an executive aid, Stafford Palmieri, as well as his previous executive counsel, Jimmy Faircloth, to the Senate Committee on Natural Resources today to testify.

 

Adley announced today that he had fused his bill into another by Senator Bret Allain, R- Jeanerette, and surrendered authorship.  The amalgamated bill, which was written in part by Jimmy Faircloth, restricts the ability of the SFLPA-E to bring forth lawsuits, citing the Coastal Zone Management Act. 

 

Faircloth told the committee that the levee board’s suits represent “a fringe cause of action,” and said, “In the Coastal Zone Management Act, you don’t need a fringe cause of action. There’s authority for enforcing the Coastal Zone Management Act in the books.”

 

John Barry, in an email to NoDef, said in response, “If it were a fringe cause of action, then the industry and Jindal wouldn't be so worried about it.  I support the parish lawsuits, but the fact is the levee board's lawsuit has much broader scope and is also more likely to be successful in court.”

 

“For the same reasons,” he said, “it is much more of a threat to the industry.”  Barry was removed from the SFLPA-E levee board but testified before the committee with his non-profit, Restore Louisiana Now.  

 

Faircloth's sentiment was echoed by Stafford Palmieri, who said, “This lawsuit is about one levee board that doesn’t want to play in the sandbox with everyone else.  And everyone else is holding hands and moving forward on a coordinated effort of coastal restoration, and this lawsuit threatens that work. And for that reason, this levee board does not have the authority under the law to file the lawsuit, and it also threatens our ability to implement the Master Plan.”

 

Palmieri added, “Since 2008 we’ve spent $1.8 billion in state dollars and $2.5 billion, including federal money, and that’s not including the $50 billion that is laid out in the Master Plan.”

 

That plan has yet to find funding.

 

Adley contended that the SFLPA-E has had plenty of funds to fill its coffers. “They’ve secured about seventeen billion dollars of state and federal money that we have spent there…and for 2014, another 540 million.”

 

Glad Jones, an attorney hired by the SFLPA-E, said that “the money is not there” for the levee board’s operation and maintenance of existing protections.  He also said that the authority was given jurisdiction by the post-Katrina amendment that created the board “to sue and be sued.”   He asked the senators “Are you prepared to say, ‘We gave you the right to sue anyone but oil companies?’”

 

Senator Jody Amedee, R-Gonzales, in what became a heated exchange, asked Senator Bret Allain, R-Jeanerette, about the oil industry’s connection to his bill.  Allain said that he sponsored the bill on behalf of Louisiana landowners.   Since some landowners asked oil and gas companies not to fill in dredged canals, he worries that they might also incur liability in the fray of the levee board’s coastal lawsuits.

 

“Brett Allain is in no way, shape, or form connected with the oil companies,” Allain said. 

 

“So your motivation is to protect a possible future claim of action that has never been done but that might be done?” Amadee asked, in an increasingly heated exchange.

 

“The cause of action is being asserted right now against the oil companies which are our lessees,” Allain said. “And, against us, if you look at it and if you bring it to fruition.” 

 

Allain said that among others, he was representing the Louisiana Landowners Association with his bill.  In response, Amadee said, “When you look at the executive committee and the board of directors… almost all of these people either work for oil companies, they own land companies, (or are) land men, and oil and gas attorneys.”

 

The bill passed with no objection and now moves to the full senate. 

 

This story was updated at 9 a.m. on 5/2/14 to include comments from John Barry.

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Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock