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Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

LUNDI

April 24th

Zurich Golf Classic

City Park, 11AM

Kick off to a 4-day stop on the PGA Championship tour

 

Crystal Energy Healing & Dream Play

1112 Mandeville St., 2PM

Talk dreams and crystals

 

Andrew Jackson Hotel Ghost Hunt

Andrew Jackson Hotel, 4PM

Sleepover ghost tour at the infamous hotel

 

International Sculpture Day

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 5:30PM

Artists Tara Conley, Rachel David, and Ashley Pridmore will discuss their work

 

Big Easy Entertainment Awards

The Orpheum Theater, 6PM

29th annual event

 

New Orleans Baby Cakes

Shrine On Airline, 7PM

Baby Cakes go up against the Omaha Storm Chasers

 

Movie Screening: La Bataille de Solférino

Cafe Istanbul, 7PM

French film about the 2012 presidential election, following Macron and Le Pen's victories during this weekend's round one

 

Cacao Ceremony

Nola Yoga Loft, 7:30PM

Set intentions for the Full Moon and share a cacao elixir

 

Ooh Poo Pah Doo Monday Blues

Carver Club, 8PM

Hosted by the bar's owner Miss Judy Hill

MARDI

April 25th

Earth Day Celebration

City Park, 4PM

Kiddie crafts, cooking demos, native plant sale, yoga, and more

 

April Hobnobber

The Country Club, 5:30PM

Sip and socialize, with complimentary wine and live music

 

Movie Screening: Ipileaye

Ashé Cac, 6PM

Story of the creation of the world 

 

Pony Up for Horses

Eiffel Society, 6PM

A benefit to aid horses in need

 

Vinyasa & Vino

Nola Yoga Loft, 6:30PM

All-levels yoga following by wine and dinner

 

Swing in the Oaks

City Park, 7PM

Annual free outdoor concert feat. Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra

 

New Moon Medicine Circle

Yes, Yoga., 7:30PM

Celebrate the cycle with visualizations, meditations, journaling, ritual, and group energy healing

 

Aaron Cohen Band

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Local faves, feat. Danny Abel Band, Shhh

 

High Profile | New Orleans Nightlife Awards

Sidney's Saloon, 10PM

Celebrate NOLA's nightlife with Garlic Junior, Jassy, and DJ Visqueen

MERCREDI

April 26th

Wednesdays at the Square

Lafayette Square, 5PM

Feat. Flow Tribe and Robin Barnes

 

Blackout Poetry Workshop

Norman Mayer Branch Library, 5PM

Teen poetry event in blackout poetry of public library books

 

Evenings with Enrique

City Park, 5PM

Feat. Raphael Bas

 

Vietnamese Style Crawfish Boil

Black Penny, 6PM

The famous boil across from Armstrong Park returns

 

Paradigm Pizza & Pies

Paradigm Gardens, 7PM

Urban farm hosts outdoor dinner, with Ancora Pizzeria

 

Eat Your Science

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

Alton Brown live

 

Movie Screening: Annie Hall

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Rooftop screening of the Woody Allen classic

 

Sound Observatory New Orleans: The Shape of Jazz to Come

Three Keys, 9PM

This month's event features Ashlin Parker Trio 

JEUDI

April 27th

 

NOLA Distilling Co. Grand Opening

NOLA Distilling Company, 3PM

Live music from Colin Lake, food from Frencheeze & La Cocinita food trucks

 

Movie Screening: Jazz Fest Shorts

The Old U.S. Mint, 6PM

Films from the inaugural 1970 Jazz Fest

 

Threadhead Thursday

City Park Botanical Gardens, 6PM

Feat. Marcia Ball, Brass-a-Holics, and Paul Sanchez & the Rolling Road Show

 

Sum 41 & Pierce the Veil

House of Blues, 6:30PM

The 'We Will Detonate!' tour

 

International Jazz Day

New Orleans Recreation Development Commission, 7PM

Celebration of jazz music and its influence

 

Jazz & Heritage Gala

Hyatt Regency, 7PM

19th annual benefit feat. a Neville Family Funktion and more

 

St. Paul and the Broken Bones

Orpheum Theater, 9PM

Birmingham band promotes second album "Sea of Noise" 


On the Absent Pulitzer

Room 220: An Interview witn Susan Larson



As chairperson of the jury that nominates finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, Susan Larson was in a unique position to observe the notable omission of a prize in the category this year. Room 220 caught up with the local literary maven to talk about the Pulitzer committee's non-decision, and the Pulitzer process.

 

Citing a failure to achieve consensus, the Pulitzer Prize committee declined to award a prize in the category of fiction this year for the first time since 1977. This decision has generated a lively debate within the American literary community over the impact of the prize—on authors as well as publishers—and its significance for contemporary American readers.

 

Susan Larson, former books editor of the Times-Picayune and host of The Reading Life on WWNO, has twice chaired the independent jury charged with narrowing down the many titles submitted to be considered for a Pulitzer. The jury chooses three nominations to send for judgment to the Pulitzer committee, which selects the year’s winner—or doesn’t.

 

The three finalist’s for this year’s unawarded Pulitzer were Swamplandia! by Karen Russell,The Pale King by David Foster Wallace, and Train Dreams by Denis Johnson.

 

Larson spoke with Room 220 recently about her thoughts on the lack of an award this year, as well as her experience working (and reading) as a fiction critic in New Orleans.

 

Room 220: How did your years as the books editor of the Times- Picayune prepare you for your position on the fiction jury?

 

Susan Larson: My work at the Times-Picayune gave me incredible discipline as a reader—I’ve read almost a book a day for most of my adult life—as well as a good overview of American fiction, the ability to work under pressure, and of course, it instilled confidence in my choices.

 

Rm 220: Besides simply working through the sheer volume of fiction submissions, what do you think was the most challenging aspect of the jury process?

 

SL: I first chaired the fiction jury in 2009, so there were no surprises this time around—except at the end, of course! The great reward of this work is the process, and sharing the experience with my fellow jurors—this year they were Maureen Corrigan, a critic I so admire, and Michael Cunningham, one of my favorite novelists.

 

Working through the sheer volume of submissions is the most challenging part. What many people don’t realize is that a number of the submissions are self-published books that take up an enormous amount of time and rarely measure up to Pulitzer standards.

 

Our group hit its stride fairly early. My previous group of jurors—Richard Dillard and Nancy Pearl—worked through email. This time, we worked primarily via conference call. The three of us had one meeting early on, in Washington, D.C., during the National Book Festival. We talked about the first round of submissions we’d read over the summer, as well as our favorite books, so we had a good sense of what we were bringing to the table. As a veteran, one of my biggest contributions was the assurance that yes, it was possible: the books would all get read, and we would come up with three finalists. You really operate with a heightened sense of alertness doing this work—you have to bring your best self to the reading, to the conversation. Our meetings and exchanges were some of the most intense, rewarding and inspiring conversations I have ever had about literature. I will treasure them for the rest of my life.

 

Rm220: What were the particular qualities or themes you were looking for when approaching a submission, and what do you think distinguished the three novels that the jury ultimately selected?

 

SL: There’s always that Pulitzer ideal lurking in the back of your mind when you’re doing this reading. It’s directed, devotional, meditative, purposeful reading, because the prize has such history and staying power. But we weren’t looking for themes! All of us were looking for inventive and powerful language, compelling characters, and masterful storytelling—books that crackled with energy and life. These three finalists possess that in abundance. The Pale King, while unfinished, still seems to me an American masterpiece. I believe it was Michael who said, “There’s not a bum line in the book.” Train Dreams is simply an exquisite tale of the American West—there are scenes in that book that will haunt me forever. And Swamplandia!—all I have to do is hear the title and I am immediately transported to that vivid landscape. The three books are so different from one another, such fine representatives of the array of talent in American writing.

 

Rm220: Was there anything about Swamplandia! that appealed to you personally, given your career as a book editor in the South and the novel’s Southern Gothic style?

 

 

SL: Oh, yes. Swamplandia! was one of my favorite novels of the year. I loved its grand ambition—it’s a truly great American tall tale. Ava Bigtree is such an engaging character, and her losses are so real, so total. And yet she has such spirit! The book is marked by such love of landscape—how heartbreaking it is to read “The swamp is writing her own suicide note.” That’s certainly something that speaks to all of us who live in Louisiana, isn’t it? I can’t wait to read what Karen Russell writes next.

 

 

Rm220: There are some who may interpret the lack of an award as a comment on the state of contemporary American literature. In your opinion, what role does the Pulitzer Prize play in the world of literary fiction and how should the Committee’s decision be viewed by the American reader?

 

SL: I don’t believe the board was trying to send a message about the state of contemporary American literature. I hope that they were just bound by their own rules and were unable to bend. It’s such an important prize—and usually it means the book has staying power. I loved the conversations I had with readers after the jury I worked with in 2009 selected Olive Kitteridge, by Elizabeth Strout, for the prize.This year, the conversations about the process have eclipsed the wonder of the books themselves. There are so many book clubs devoted to Pulitzer choices—everyone loves to debate their merits, predict outcomes, and suggest alternate choices. And these days, anything that drives a large readership to a particular book seems nothing short of a miracle. The best possible spin an American reader can put on this decision is that she should read all three books and decide for herself.

 

One of the things that surprised me the most on Monday was the public’s—and much of the media’s—misapprehension of the way the process works. Many seemed to think that the jury awarded the prize. The jury submits three finalists to the board in an unranked report. The jurors actually find out the result at the same time everyone else does.

 

Rm220: What other novels would you recommend from 2011 that didn’t make the final three? Were there any New Orleans authors up for consideration?

 

SL: Due to the confidential nature of the work, I don’t think I should comment on what other books were nominated. Speaking strictly for myself, among the books I admired most last year were Diana Abu-Jaber’s Birds of Paradise, Russell Banks’ The Lost Memory of Skin, Kevin Brockmeier’s The Illumination (a special favorite), Teju Cole’s Open City, Chad Harbach’s Art of Fielding, Julie Otsuka’s The Buddha in the Attic, Ann Patchett’s State of Wonder, Tom Perrotta’s The Leftovers, Hector Tobar’s Barbarian Nurseries, Justin Torres’We the Animals, Amy Waldman’s The Submission, Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones (one of the remarkable novels inspired by the events of Hurricane Katrina).

 

Rm220: What are your thoughts on the tradition of literary fiction in New Orleans and do you still see the city as an incubator for literary thought and expression?

 

SL: It just keeps on coming, doesn’t it? Natives come of age, turn to writing, render their experiences; writers come to town, settle down, stake out a literary neighborhood and bring it to life; other writers drift through, visiting for short or extended stays, and take away something that later comes to light in a surprising way. New Orleans is a kind of True South on the literary compass—its allure remains strong. And in these post-Katrina years, everyonein the city has a sense of story, a hard-won tale of their own. We all have a stake in our urban narrative. That’s a rare quality in a city, to value the shared story, to collaborate in the large sense of public creativity. No end in sight!

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Linzi Falk, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt


Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily