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THE

Defender Picks

 

JEUDI

April 27th

 

NOLA Distilling Co. Grand Opening

NOLA Distilling Company, 3PM

Live music from Colin Lake, food from Frencheeze & La Cocinita food trucks

 

Movie Screening: Jazz Fest Shorts

The Old U.S. Mint, 6PM

Films from the inaugural 1970 Jazz Fest

 

Threadhead Thursday

City Park Botanical Gardens, 6PM

Feat. Marcia Ball, Brass-a-Holics, and Paul Sanchez & the Rolling Road Show

 

Sum 41 & Pierce the Veil

House of Blues, 6:30PM

The 'We Will Detonate!' tour

 

International Jazz Day

New Orleans Recreation Development Commission, 7PM

Celebration of jazz music and its influence

 

Jazz & Heritage Gala

Hyatt Regency, 7PM

19th annual benefit feat. a Neville Family Funktion and more

 

St. Paul and the Broken Bones

Orpheum Theater, 9PM

Birmingham band promotes second album "Sea of Noise" 

VENDREDI

April 28th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds, all day

And it begins! 

 

Yestadt Millinery Pop-Up

W New Orleans, 10AM

Shop the latest hat styles

 

Friday Nights at NOMA

NOMA, 5PM

A lecture on the hidden musicians of Venice: the fascinating story of Vivaldi's all-female orchestra

 

Movie Screening: Personal Shopper

Prytania Theatre, 6PM/8PM 

Kristen Stewart stars as a shopper who sees ghosts, screened as a closing event of the New Orleans French Film Festival

 

Bar Redux Third Anniversary

Bar Redux, 8PM

Feat. JD Hill and the Jammers

 

Dark Star Orchestra

Joy Theater, 8:30PM

The sound of the Grateful Dead

 

Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals

Orpheum Theater, 9PM

Harper reteams with his longtime supporting band

 

The Soul Rebels

Blue Nile, 10PM

Brass legends bring da funk to Frenchmen 

 

Flow Tribe and Big Chief Monk Boudreaux & The Golden Eagles

Sanctuary Cultural Arts Center, 10PM

Backbone crackin' music

 

Bayou Boylesque

GrandPre's, 10PM

All-male local burlesque

 

Questlove

House of Blues, 12AM

The Roots drummer performs a late night DJ set

 

Screening: Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog & Buffy the Vampire Slayer

Prytanian Theatre, 12AM

Screening of the Neil Patrick Harris show and Buffy's musical ep "Once More, With Feeling" 

SAMEDI

April 29th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds, all day

Day two 

 

Galactic + Roar

Tipitina's, 8PM

Funk jazz jam

 

Thunder from Down Under

Harrah's Casino, 8PM

Australian's Chipendales style male dancers

 

Shannon and the Clams

Siberia, 9PM

Garage indie surf-punk 

 

Stooges Brass Band

Blue Nile, 9:30PM

NOLA classics remixed with heavy hip hop influence

 

Mod Dance Party

Circle Bar, 10PM

Monthly 60's themed event, with DJ Matty

 

Honey Island Swamp Band

Sanctuary Cultural Arts Center, 10PM

Swamp Americana. Feat. The London Souls

 

STS9

Joy Theater, 10PM

Instrumental electronic rock

 

Gutenberg! The Musical! 

The Theatre at St. Claude, 10:30PM

Last night of the musical comedy about making a show about printing press inventor Johann Gutenberg

 

The Heat

Maison, 11:30PM

Feat. Ivan Neville, Oteil Burbridge, Stanton Moore, and Eric Krasno

DIMANCHE

April 30th

Jazz Fest

Fair Grounds, all day

Final day of weekend one

 

Breakfest

Bayou Beer Garden, 9AM

The most important meal of the year

 

Movie Screening: The Invisible Man

Prytania Theatre, 10AM

1933 sci-fi horror classic

 

Dan TDM

Saenger Theatre, 3PM

YouTube superstar comes to town

 

Sunday Musical Meditation

Marigny Opera House, 5PM

Feat. guitarist and composer David Sigler

 

One Tease to Rule Them All

Eiffel Society, 7PM

Lord of the Rings burlesque

 

Joe Krown Trio

Maple Leaf Bar, 7PM

Feat. Walter "Wolfman" Washington and Russell Batiste, plus a crawfish boil

 

Blato Zlato

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA-based Balkan band

 

What is a Motico? 

Zeitgeist Arts Center, 9PM

Helen Gillet presents Belgian avant garde films


The Hunting of the Snark

Facing the Stage: A Review



NoDef Theatre Writer Helen Jaksch heads to the CAC for the first of four March installments of the Skin Horse Theatre's stage adaptation of Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark.

 

A new and original theatrical ditty

Made just for kids in this city

Was presented by Skin Horse Theater and friends.

 

Adapted from The Hunting of the Snark,

A delightful poetical lark

By none other than good ol’ Lewis Carroll.

 

On that day at the CAC

Kids of all ages had a fine reverie

As part of the Children’s Theater Series.

 

And if you missed it, don’t be sad.

There’s still fun to be had

With Snark in the Park and in the Dark all through March!

 

Watching The Hunting of the Snark at Contemporary Arts Center Saturday, I could not help but feel nostalgic for the first show that I had ever seen. It was School House Rock at Socorro High School in El Paso, Texas, and I was all of six years old. It was magical, and it changed my life. Skin Horse Theater’s latest theatrical offering, adapted for the stage from Lewis Carroll's poem The Hunting of the Snark: An Agony in 8 Fits, will make life-long theatre lovers out of kids of all ages.

 

Charming, whimsical, and very funny, Skin Horse Theatre’s Snark delivers all the ingredients of great children’s theatre. Tackling Lewis Carroll’s very word-heavy and nonsensical poem about a band of buddies on the search for a fantastical creature called a Snark, The Skin Horses do it without either pandering to their young audiences or talking down to them. Like most shows I see, it could have used another week or two of rehearsal, but, all in all, it hits the sweet spot.


And if you asked any of those awe-struck and excited children after the show, they did not notice those few moments when it got a little sloppy. They thought it was perfect and loved every minute.

 

The Hunting of the Snark
Where: NOMA Sculpture Garden, City Park and Backyard Ballroom 
When: March 3, 10, 17, 3 p.m. at NOMA, 10 p.m. at Backyard Ballroom
Tickets: Free at NOMA, $5 at Backyard Ballroom

 

Utilizing neither sets nor props, Snark is only body, voice, and costumes. It is a lovely combination of the tripping, dipping, looping words of Carroll and Philip Berezney’s colorful costumes. The costumes reminded me of children pulling whatever they could find from their closets: throwing everything on at once and putting on a play for their teddy bears or their mother’s guests. It was easy to forgive the rough execution when the essence was so right. Not to mention that they pay homage to the incredible drawings by Henry Holiday that accompany Carroll’s text. Some of my favorite fabric-based flairs were Kyle Williams’ Beaver costume and the oodles of coats that made the very tiny Cecile Monteyne’s Baker look like a giant berry.

 

Director Veronica Hunsinger-Loe went back to the basics of the body as the core of storytelling in this adventure. Those bodies of the ensemble create everything from the bow of a ship to the rocky face of an island to trees in a spooky forest. It all challenges us to indulge in our imaginations. Hunsinger-Loe does not let her ensemble shy away from the poem’s dark themes and somewhat unhappy ending, but she also finds the humor and the lightness. There are wonderful reminders in the stage choreography, such as in the Barrister’s dream or the ensemble’s creation of the terrifying Bandersnatch, that you do not need a big budget to create moments of fright and wonder. The Hunting of the Snark is one of the first pieces of children’s theatre that I have seen in a long time that does not forget that it is theatre.

 

The Snark Crew is a solid ensemble. Berezney, Williams, Monteyne, Nat Kusinitz, Matt Standley, Evan Spigelman, and Glenna Broderick brought high energy and a generosity of spirit that was wonderful to be a part of. There were a few performances, however, that shined extra brightly on that cloudy afternoon. Kusinitz played the Bellman, the leader of the Snark-hunting voyage. Sporting a cloth beard and a striped shirt, Kusinitz expertly led the ensemble with his precise physicality and abundance of enthusiasm. Monteyne brought the house down with her Victorian rap, and Standley’s signature movement and catch phrase as the Butcher was funny every single time he did it. But the comedienne that stole the show was Williams as the Beaver. A master of committing to big choices and funny voices, Williams was able to walk that fine line of bold choices without stepping on her fellow performers’ toes. She loves to mug almost as much as we love watching. Williams nonetheless knows when to let others have their moment. She is the sticky, goofy glue that brings Carroll’s poem to life with wit, heart, and comedy to spare.
 

 

Want to be a part of the hunt? Skin Horse Theater is taking Snark on the road in March. See it in the park at the NOMA Sculpture Garden at 3:00pm and in the dark (for grown-up kids) at the Backyard Ballroom at 10:00pm March 3rd, 10th, and 17th.

They threatened its life with

They threatened its life with a railroad share!

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Linzi Falk, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt


Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily