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Lagniappe

 
THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

May 30th

Down on Their Luck Orchestra

Music at the Mint, 2PM

Jazz at the Old U.S. Mint

 

Craft Happy Hour

Ogden, 6PM

Learn to make paper magnolias with Suzonne Stirling

 

Vibrational Sound Therapy

Glitter Box, 6PM

Discover the energetic magic of Himalayan Singing Bowls with Faun Fenderson

 

Monty Banks

Mahogany Jazz Hall, 6PM

Trad Jazz, rat pack era swing and more

 

HIITuesdays

Peristyle in City Park, 6:30PM

High Intensity Interval Training

 

Train 

Champions Square, 7PM

Feat. O.A.R. and Natasha Bedingfield

 

Gender 101

LGBT Community Center, 7PM

Expand your understanding of gender

 

Thinkin' with Lincoln

Bayou Beer Garden, 7PM

Trivia on the patio

 

Spring Wrap-Up Show

Arts Estuary 1024, 8PM

Performances and screenings by the artist residents

 

High Profile

Hi-Ho Lounge, 10PM

NOLA drag stars host a variety talent show, The Stage

MERCREDI

May 31st

Abe Thompson

Market Café, 3:30PM

Feat. The Doctors of Funk

 

Food Waste Collection

Children’s Resource Center, 5PM

Bring your frozen food scraps to be composted

 

Weird Wine Wednesdays

Spirit Wine, 6PM

Free wine tasting

 

Free Spirited Yoga

The Tchoup Yard, 6:30PM

Food, drinks, yoga

 

CeCe Winans

Orpheum Theater, 7PM

Part of the “Let Them Fall In Love” tour

 

Dance for Bathrooms

Three Keys, 8PM

Benefitting Music Box Village

 

Rooftop Cinema

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

A showing of But I’m A Cheerleader

 

Major Bacon

Banks St. Bar, 10PM

Sizzlin blues and free BLTs

 

Caleb Ryan Martin

Check Point Charlie, 11PM

Acoustic blues and roots

JEUDI

June 1st

Jazz in The Park

Armstrong Park, 4PM

Jon Clearly + the Absolute Monster Gentlemen

 

Book Signing

Garden District Book Shop, 6PM

Signing of My Love Looks Back by Jessica B. Harris

 

Mardi Gras Concert

Tipitina’s, 6PM

Benefitting Marty Hurley Endowment Center

 

Summer Of Sustainability

Aquarium Of The Americas, 630PM

Enjoy oysters in a unique setting

 

Magical Burlesque

The Willow, 7PM

Harry Potter themed burlesque show

 

Bonnie Bishop

One Eyed Jack’s, 9PM

Sweet country rock

 

ButchLivesMatter

14 Parishes, 9PM

Roasts, toasts and laughs

 

Una Walkonhorst

The Circle Bar, 930PM

Also feat. Patrick Sylvester

 

Lost Stars

Balcony Music Club, 11PM

Support by Mighty Brother 

 

VENDREDI

June 2nd

Symphony Book Fair

Lakefront Arena, 9AM

Benefitting the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra

 

Summer Kick Off Film Party

Second Line Stages, 5PM

Supporting BREASTS the film

 

Nateus Photography Opening

Cherry Espresso Bar, 6PM

Photos as a medium of self expression, snacks included

 

Dinner and a ZOOvie

Audubon Zoo, 6PM

Showing of the movie Moana

 

Self Absorbed

TREO, 6PM

A peek inside fifteen artists

 

Lagniappe Performance Series

Loyola Univeristy @ Marquette Hall, 7PM

Performance by Mikhala W. Iversen

 

As One

Marigny Opera House, 8PM

A transgender musical odyssey

 

Joel Wilson

The Building, 9PM

Also featuring Simon Lott as Context Killer

 

Brass-A-Holics

Blue Nile, 11PM

GoGo Brass Funk band 

 

SAMEDI

June 3rd

Grand Opening Party

Parleaux Beer Lab, 11AM

Pouring on all 12 taps

 

Water Words

New Orleans Public Library, 11AM

Exploring the special role of water in our city and in life

 

Basics of Beekeeping

Hollygrove Market, 1PM

Learn how to start your own apiary

 

First Saturday Gallery Openings

Arts District, 6PM

Check out new and returning exhibitions

 

Harrison Avenue Stroll

Harrison Avenue, 5PM

Food, drinks, fun

 

Louisiana Wetlands

Carol Robinson Gallery, 5PM

Original art by Dave Ivey

 

Moonlit Paddle

Manchec Swamp, 545PM

Enjoy an evening of paddling close to home

 

Final Gala Concert

Jazz and Heritage Center, 8PM

Closing out the Birdfoot Festival

 

Canine Karaoke

Homedale Inn Bar, 9PM

Supporting the Love A Pit Foundation

 

TRAX ONLY

Poor Boys Bar, 12AM

Resident DJs, along with special guest

DIMANCHE

June 4th

June Puppy Social

Louisiana SPCA, 10AM

Toys, treats, low impact agility

 

Jazz Brunch

Josephine Estelle, 11AM

Live sounds served sunny side up

 

THINK DEEP

The Drifter Hotel, 12PM

Presented by Techno Club

 

Book Discussion

Garden District Book Shop, 12PM

C.D. Colins discusses her memoir

 

Summer Reading Kick Off

NOPL Youth Services, 1PM

Feat. Roots music and books by Johnette Downing

 

Saving Abel

Southport Music Hall, 6PM

With support by Akadia and First Fracture

 

Open Mic and Slam

Ashé Cac, 7PM

Team SNO + Jahman Hill

 

Edge Film Festival

Zeitgeist Center, 730PM

Short film screenings + awards

 

Frontier Ruckus

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Enjoy some multi genre rock


The Surprise Soloist

LPO Still Buzzing From Dazzling, Last-Minute Concerto By One of Their Own



When a world-renowned soloist fell ill, the Louisiana Philharmonic called on one of their own. Elizabeth Gross talks to orchestra members about Christopher Pell's heroic weekend.

 

Anticipation for Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra’s “Eroica” concert on Thurs., Feb. 21, ran high. Beethoven’s “Eroica” is a favorite of many, and opportunities to hear world-class clarinetists like Jose Franch-Ballester don’t come often.

 

The concert began with American composer Michael Torke’s “Ash”, which created a bridge between Beethoven’s grand themes and Copland’s quintessentially American style. The piece was exciting to hear, relying on insistent repetitions in a rhythm that is just a little unsettling—as if the whole thing is spinning at an angle.

 

After applause came, there was an unexpected announcement from Maestro Carlos Miguel Prieto: the orchestra would take the intermission early because the featured guest soloist, clarinetist Franch-Ballester, was ill (and possibly unable to perform). With that, the lights came up on a concerned, disoriented audience. By the end of the intermission, rumors were circulating about what would happen next.

 

When Prieto addressed the audience again, he was excited. He announced that the LPO’s own principal clarinet, Christopher Pell, had volunteered to perform Copland’s Clarinet Concerto with the orchestra. Pell, who is only 21 and is still completing his undergraduate degree at Julliard, had already enchanted the LPO audience this season with memorable solos from his chair. But performing a 17-minute concerto alone in front of the orchestra was an entirely different task. Prieto stressed that the orchestra had not rehearsed this piece with Pell.

 

Violist Matt Carrington shared what went through his mind during the “emergency intermission” between Prieto’s two announcements. Like others in the orchestra and the audience, Carrington had a crazy thought: Pell could play this. Besides the soloist, there’s no clarinet part in the Copland. Even though Carrington’s gut feeling was that Pell could do it, when he saw Pell preparing backstage he thought, “Holy crap this is actually happening.”

 

Pell took the stage looking a little pale, and in the silence before the piece began it seemed the whole hall held its breath. And then, the haunting melody that opens the first movement lifted into the air. Pell’s performance was magical and moving. The intensity of the audience’s attention (and the orchestra’s) during his virtuosic cadenza in the second movement was unlike anything this writer has been a part of in a lifetime of symphony-going. The orchestra (or, rather, the rest of the orchestra) sounded great, too. Prieto’s conducting was responsive and kept everyone together throughout—both in the delicate conversation between clarinet and strings in the moody first movement and in the bright, jazzy third movement.

 

The audience response was immediate—a leaping ovation, complete with the kind of hooting and hollering usually reserved for sporting events. But what made the concert so special was the response Pell got from the rest of the orchestra, who also leapt to their feet for Pell’s first bow, then stamped their feet on the stage during his subsequent bows. Maestro Prieto gave Pell a warm hug, and showed his own triumph by raising both fists in the air as he bounded offstage.

 

 “It’s every orchestral musician’s dream to sort of step up and save the day and be in the limelight—and music-making captures the feeling of music when it can be so spontaneous and impromptu," Carrington said.

 

Copland originally wrote his Clarinet Concerto for jazz clarinetist Benny Goodman, a famous improviser. Through his beautiful interpretation and through the incredible circumstances, Pell’s unplanned performance brought that improvisational spirit to life. 

 

After a brief pause, Pell attempted a discreet return to his seat in the woodwind section, but was interrupted by more applause. He still had to play the “Eroica”! Prieto took Pell’s extraordinary example as an opportunity to remind the audience of the high caliber of musicianship in the LPO as a whole.

 

The timing for Beethoven’s triumphant third symphony couldn’t have been more appropriate. Though I doubt anyone was thinking of Napoleon Bonaparte that night, one could certainly make an argument for the values of egalité and fraternité. The LPO’s performance of “Eroica” captured perfectly the democratic ideals that inspired Beethoven, and are also present in the LPO organization itself as the nation’s only full time orchestra that is self-owned and self-managed. 

 

Pell stepping in at the last minute was nothing short of revolutionary in the world of professional orchestras.

 

“I have never seen this circumstance in my 40 years of professional playing, and it underscores the importance of live music. You never know what magic can happen," said Annie Cohen, a cellist and founding member of the LPO.

 

After the concert, the first question for the orchestra was “Who’s going to take Chris out to celebrate?” Violists Katie and Matt Carrington happily rose to the occasion. But before they headed out, Katie had to ask, “Wait—is he old enough?” (he is).

 

Pell performed Copland’s Clarinet Concerto again Friday night in Covington, as the guest soloist was still violently ill in his hotel. Friday night’s concert was also enthusiastically received.

 

Prieto has announced on the LPO’s website www.lpomusic.com that he will match all donations to the orchestra until March 31st of this year, inspired by Pell’s performance to ensure the LPO is able to continue to attract such extraordinary musicians.

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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor

Alexis Manrodt

Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus

Stephen Babcock

Published Daily