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THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

March 28th

Book Reading: Elizabeth Pearce

Garden District Book Shop, 6PM

From her new book "Drink Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Best Cocktail Bars, Dives, & Speakeasies"

 

Spring Publishing Camp

Tubby & Coo's Mid-City Book Shop, 7PM

Book publishing workshop

 

Gabby Douglas

Dillrd University, 7PM

Olympic gymnast talks fame and fitness

 

Laelume

The Carver, 7PM

World soul jazz music

 

Laughter Without Borders

Loyola University, 7PM

Clowns for a cause, to benefit Syrian refugees

 

Tuesday Night Haircuts

St. Roch Tavern, 8PM

Tonight: beer, haircuts, karaoke

 

Thinkin' With Lincoln 

Bayou Beer Garden, 8PM

Outdoor trivia

 

Water Seed

Blue Nile, 9PM

Interstellar future funk

 

Stanton Moore Trio

Snug Harbor, 10PM

Galactic drummer’s side project - also at 8PM

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 


The Surprise Soloist

LPO Still Buzzing From Dazzling, Last-Minute Concerto By One of Their Own



When a world-renowned soloist fell ill, the Louisiana Philharmonic called on one of their own. Elizabeth Gross talks to orchestra members about Christopher Pell's heroic weekend.

 

Anticipation for Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra’s “Eroica” concert on Thurs., Feb. 21, ran high. Beethoven’s “Eroica” is a favorite of many, and opportunities to hear world-class clarinetists like Jose Franch-Ballester don’t come often.

 

The concert began with American composer Michael Torke’s “Ash”, which created a bridge between Beethoven’s grand themes and Copland’s quintessentially American style. The piece was exciting to hear, relying on insistent repetitions in a rhythm that is just a little unsettling—as if the whole thing is spinning at an angle.

 

After applause came, there was an unexpected announcement from Maestro Carlos Miguel Prieto: the orchestra would take the intermission early because the featured guest soloist, clarinetist Franch-Ballester, was ill (and possibly unable to perform). With that, the lights came up on a concerned, disoriented audience. By the end of the intermission, rumors were circulating about what would happen next.

 

When Prieto addressed the audience again, he was excited. He announced that the LPO’s own principal clarinet, Christopher Pell, had volunteered to perform Copland’s Clarinet Concerto with the orchestra. Pell, who is only 21 and is still completing his undergraduate degree at Julliard, had already enchanted the LPO audience this season with memorable solos from his chair. But performing a 17-minute concerto alone in front of the orchestra was an entirely different task. Prieto stressed that the orchestra had not rehearsed this piece with Pell.

 

Violist Matt Carrington shared what went through his mind during the “emergency intermission” between Prieto’s two announcements. Like others in the orchestra and the audience, Carrington had a crazy thought: Pell could play this. Besides the soloist, there’s no clarinet part in the Copland. Even though Carrington’s gut feeling was that Pell could do it, when he saw Pell preparing backstage he thought, “Holy crap this is actually happening.”

 

Pell took the stage looking a little pale, and in the silence before the piece began it seemed the whole hall held its breath. And then, the haunting melody that opens the first movement lifted into the air. Pell’s performance was magical and moving. The intensity of the audience’s attention (and the orchestra’s) during his virtuosic cadenza in the second movement was unlike anything this writer has been a part of in a lifetime of symphony-going. The orchestra (or, rather, the rest of the orchestra) sounded great, too. Prieto’s conducting was responsive and kept everyone together throughout—both in the delicate conversation between clarinet and strings in the moody first movement and in the bright, jazzy third movement.

 

The audience response was immediate—a leaping ovation, complete with the kind of hooting and hollering usually reserved for sporting events. But what made the concert so special was the response Pell got from the rest of the orchestra, who also leapt to their feet for Pell’s first bow, then stamped their feet on the stage during his subsequent bows. Maestro Prieto gave Pell a warm hug, and showed his own triumph by raising both fists in the air as he bounded offstage.

 

 “It’s every orchestral musician’s dream to sort of step up and save the day and be in the limelight—and music-making captures the feeling of music when it can be so spontaneous and impromptu," Carrington said.

 

Copland originally wrote his Clarinet Concerto for jazz clarinetist Benny Goodman, a famous improviser. Through his beautiful interpretation and through the incredible circumstances, Pell’s unplanned performance brought that improvisational spirit to life. 

 

After a brief pause, Pell attempted a discreet return to his seat in the woodwind section, but was interrupted by more applause. He still had to play the “Eroica”! Prieto took Pell’s extraordinary example as an opportunity to remind the audience of the high caliber of musicianship in the LPO as a whole.

 

The timing for Beethoven’s triumphant third symphony couldn’t have been more appropriate. Though I doubt anyone was thinking of Napoleon Bonaparte that night, one could certainly make an argument for the values of egalité and fraternité. The LPO’s performance of “Eroica” captured perfectly the democratic ideals that inspired Beethoven, and are also present in the LPO organization itself as the nation’s only full time orchestra that is self-owned and self-managed. 

 

Pell stepping in at the last minute was nothing short of revolutionary in the world of professional orchestras.

 

“I have never seen this circumstance in my 40 years of professional playing, and it underscores the importance of live music. You never know what magic can happen," said Annie Cohen, a cellist and founding member of the LPO.

 

After the concert, the first question for the orchestra was “Who’s going to take Chris out to celebrate?” Violists Katie and Matt Carrington happily rose to the occasion. But before they headed out, Katie had to ask, “Wait—is he old enough?” (he is).

 

Pell performed Copland’s Clarinet Concerto again Friday night in Covington, as the guest soloist was still violently ill in his hotel. Friday night’s concert was also enthusiastically received.

 

Prieto has announced on the LPO’s website www.lpomusic.com that he will match all donations to the orchestra until March 31st of this year, inspired by Pell’s performance to ensure the LPO is able to continue to attract such extraordinary musicians.

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Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock