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Gulf Gas Well Kicks, Rig Personnel Evacuated


As the feds are entering the final stages of meting out punishment for the Deepwater Horizon disaster, the depths of the Gulf of Mexico kicked up an uncontrolled flow of gas once again. This time, however, the blowout preventer worked. On Feb. 5, a drilling well owned by Apache Corp. took a "kick" - or rush of natural gas into the drill pipe.


2 Missing After Explosion at Gulf of Mexico Oil Platform


Updated 7:30 p.m.

Not even 24 hours after BP admitted guilt for the Big Oozy, another oil facility explosion and fire was reported in the Gulf of Mexico. According to Plaquemines Parish officials, the explosions was reported at a shallow water platform owned by Black Elk Energy about 25 miles off Grand Isle at 9:15 a.m., and the Coast Guard dispatched crews to put out the fire. Two people are missing, according to the Coast Guard. It was previously reported that 


Oil Worker Sentenced for Lying About Blowout Preventer


The Deepwater Horizon disaster acquainted us with that house-sized devices known as a blowout preventer. But the 2010 disaster isn't the only time there's been issues with the device that's supposed to stop a major oil leak if there's problems with a deep sea well. A federal judge handed a former federal worker from Mississippi two years probation for lying about pressure testing on a Gulf of Mexico drillig rig's blowout preventer shortly after the 2010 Gulf oil disaster.


Rigged!


One of the funny things about experiencing a massive oil catastrophe is that we get jumpy when we hear about rig explosions in our 'hood. So, after the Big Oozy, we report 'em all. The latest hit took place in Bayou Perot where three workers were injured (hospitalized in West Jef Med) after an oil rig explosion. Apparently, they were welding at the time of the blast. More details (See, details, totally different than Deepwater) here.


Oil Slick Blues

Gulf Gaffe Gets Real



It’s normal for Charlie Robin III to start thinking about shrimp
and oysters this time of year. But as the stakes of a still-growing
oil spill ratcheted up Wednesday on the shores of Southeast Louisiana,
the St. Bernard Parish native and lifelong fisherman was worried about
having something to catch this year in the fertile seafood grounds to
the east of the mouth of the Mississippi river.
“If you lose your crop, you don’t have anything else to fall back on,”


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Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Alexis Manrodt, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

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Michael Weber, B.A.

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Linzi Falk

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Alexis Manrodt


B. E. Mintz


Stephen Babcock

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